House of Commons Hansard #157 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Budget Implementation Act, 2001
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Oak Ridges, ON

Mr. Speaker, with regard to tools used by mechanics and dentists, dentists are self-employed. There is a greater risk and therefore they get the capital cost allowance rollover because of depreciation versus mechanics, particularly those who are employed by companies, who obviously have great expense as we pointed out earlier. This new measure in the budget would apply to those apprentices. One is a self-employed risk issue and one is employed by someone else. We are trying to address that issue.

In terms of the airport tax, I do not know that there is any definitive study that could be done on the initial devastating effects of September 11. We have seen changes in the market since then. We have seen Air Canada rehiring people. We have seen WestJet buy new planes and get new routes. All this has been since the budget was announced in December. They were aware back in December that the particular airport security tax was coming on board and yet they are rehiring, getting new planes and new routes. Obviously the market is bounding back better than expected. We are pleased to see that.

Taiwan
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

John Finlay Oxford, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week the Ingersoll Pipe Band and Oxford County Warden Dave Oliphant are in Taiwan for celebrations marking the 130th anniversary of Reverend George Leslie MacKay's mission to the city of Tamsui.

Reverend MacKay, a renowned Presbyterian missionary hailing from Zorra township in my riding of Oxford, gave remarkable service to the people of northern Taiwan from 1872 until his death in 1901 and is now considered a national hero.

The Ingersoll Pipe Band and Warden Oliphant are in Tamsui, invited by the Presbyterian Church of Taiwan, in recognition of the official twinning relationship between Oxford county and Tamsui township. They will participate in the dedication of a park built to honour George William MacKay who carried on his father's work in that country.

I extend best wishes to the Ingersoll Pipe Band and Warden Oliphant as they represent the people of Oxford county and Canada at all of this week's events in Taiwan.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, the old adage that there is nothing certain except death and taxes is something every one of us as Canadians has been able to say in equal measure. Now of course there will be a qualifier: unless one is a native.

Once again the courts are driving a wedge between native and non-native people of Canada with their questionable decision making. The recent federal court decision to exempt one group of people from paying any taxation, at any level, is bound to be rejected by all other Canadians. An exemption for natives covered by Treaty 8 will further alienate our aboriginal people from the mainstream of society and marginalize the natives themselves.

Clear thinking Canadians realize that reasonable levels of taxation are required to provide services to all citizens. Why does the government not realize that we can never build equality by dividing people?

2002 Winter Paralympic Games
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour today to acknowledge the accomplishments of three great Canadian athletes who earned medals or top eight finishes yesterday at the Salt Lake City Paralympics.

I am referring, of course, to Karolina Wisniewka, from Calgary, Alberta, who won the silver medal in the women's giant slalom event. Karolina's achievement at these games is extraordinary. She has already won two bronze medals and, yesterday's silver medal.

Lauren Woolstencroft of Calgary, Alberta, brought home the bronze medal in the same event, the women's giant slalom. At 20, Lauren has proven herself to be a worthy competitor. With one gold medal under her belt at these paralympic games she had no problem winning a bronze medal in another challenging event.

Chris Williamson of Edmonton, Alberta, and his guide, Bill Harriot of Windsor, Ontario, finished 5th in the men's downhill event. Chris started in competitive skiing for people with disabilities in January 1998, and was chosen as a member of the Canadian team the next fall.

I congratulate these athletes for their great victories and thank them for making us so proud.

Social Programs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, last week I had the privilege of announcing $170,000 in funding for Vancouver's planned lifetime advocacy network institute for citizenship and disability.

PLAN is an exceptional program that is creating innovative ways to help people living with disabilities increase their well-being, safety and security. PLAN focuses on creating self-sufficient community organizations and self-reliant families to accomplish its aims.

We must continue working to build an inclusive nation where all Canadians have the opportunity to fully explore their potential and enjoy a good standard of living. The Government of Canada's support of PLAN is an important step in this process of self-development.

National Defence
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Lynn Myers Waterloo—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today with a startling announcement: Halifax has been invaded. Department of National Defence officials have informed me that the Granovikstan Revolutionary Army, the GRA, is intent on capturing the seaport of Halifax and moving further inland. This is an outrageous act of aggression and it must not be tolerated.

It is understandable that the GRA would want to invade Halifax which is, after all, home to many of the pillars of Canadian culture: Alexander Keith's beer, Rita McNeil, Thomas the Tugboat and finally,

This Hour Has 22 Minutes.

Second Battalion, the Royal Canadian Regiment, under the leadership of Lieutenant Colonel Jon Vance has been tasked with defending our brothers and sisters in Halifax. This battalion along with its supporting elements shall be victorious.

In all seriousness, military exercises conducted by the Canadian Armed Forces, including Exercise Royal Guard now under way in the maritimes, serve to remind all Canadians of the professionalism, courage and commitment of our military men and women.

I thank each and every one of them for their dedication to protecting our great country.

La Maison Le Baluchon
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, I recently attended a celebration to mark the 10th anniversary of La Maison Le Baluchon, in Saint-Hyacinthe. This organization provides support services for youth experiencing difficulties, be they personal, social, or related to family or school.

However, it is mostly a place where adolescents who are going through a rough patch can come and feel that they belong and meet with welcoming and caring professionals who help them sort through their problems.

Countless young people who have gone through La Maison Le Baluchon over the past ten years have renewed their will to live, to take their lives in hand, and to build. This organization's contribution to the community in Saint-Hyacinthe has been invaluable.

I would like to thank Brother Lamoureux, founder of the project, who introduced me to Le Baluchon, the survival of which became my first cause as a member in 1993.

I would also like to congratulate the chair of the board, Claude Rainville, the co-coordinator and her assistant, Brigitte Sansoucy and Lucie Bilodeau, as well as all of the volunteers who do such admirable work for the benefit of our young people and all of the community.

Long live La Maison Le Baluchon.

Grants and Contributions
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the practice of farming out lucrative contracts to political friends is hardly new to government, but I think all Canadians would agree that the Groupaction fiasco set a whole new low.

Yes, we finally found the mystery document. The real mystery is not where it went. The real mystery is why we spent $550,000 on a ragtag stack of random data sheets in only one language advising government of upcoming sporting and cultural events.

In another separate contract to Groupaction worth $575,000, it was to have carried out two tasks and delivered only one. Then last year, with Alfonso Gagliano still at the helm, the firm received a $615,000 contract to evaluate the quality of its work as a consultant to the government.

Political campaign contributions worth $70,000 have yielded this company nearly $2 million in what appears to be corporate, make work projects. These are not contract awards, they are patronage rewards.

Middle East
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

John Bryden Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to deplore the killing of an Italian journalist by Israeli troops during fighting in Ramallah on the West Bank on Wednesday.

Freelance photographer Raffaele Ciriello was hit in the abdomen by a burst of fire from an Israeli tank as he and an Italian TV cameraman were covering the actions of Palestinian gunmen.

This, regrettably, was the fatal outcome of a number of incidents where journalists have come under fire in the Middle East and is a reminder that journalists put their lives on the line in their effort to keep the eye of the world on tragic conflicts such as that now ensuing between Israelis and Palestinians.

Natural Resources
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, until recently the silence from the Prime Minister regarding the softwood lumber dispute has been deafening.

On behalf of all Canadian families dependent upon the harvesting, manufacturing and marketing of lumber, I asked the Prime Minister on November 2 to immediately go to Washington to settle this issue. Apparently immediately to him means four and a half months or 130 days.

Nevertheless I wish to congratulate the PM for finally fully engaging the president on this critical file. With March 21 less than a week away hopefully it will not be a case of too little too late.

This reminds me of another crucial issue threatening the future of British Columbia's forests and economy, the mountain pine beetle crisis. I ask the Minister of Natural Resources to clarify whether he has received a commitment from the finance minister to provide the $600 million over 10 years as the federal government's share of the funds necessary to combat this epidemic.

Airport Security
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Gouk Kootenay—Boundary—Okanagan, BC

Mr. Speaker, it has been said that the Liberal government has never met a tax that it did not like. It must be delighted now that it is on the eve of the biggest tax grab of the decade. I am speaking of the $24 airport security tax due to commence in 15 days.

Is it a good tax? No, there is no such thing. Is it a necessary tax? Again the answer is no. It is far in excess of what aviation experts say is necessary. It is far larger than what is being charged by the U.S. who the transport minister said was well behind us in airport security prior to September 11.

There are many initiatives the government can and must take before embarking on another Liberal spending spree. It has no spending plan, no budget, no impact study on small and start up airlines and it has no plan on the implementation of the collection of the tax grab.

The government should delay the new tax grab until studies are done, budgets are prepared and alternatives are developed and implemented. This is the responsible thing to do. To do otherwise is, well, Liberal.

Leo Young
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few days ago, the community of Laval lost one of its most prominent figures. After spending many years helping out people in need, Leo Young died at the age of 85.

Mr. Young, who was the co-founder, with his wife Cliffelene Horne, of the non-profit organization called Agape, spent time and energy helping out the poor.

Since 1976, Agape, which, in Hebrew and Greek means “love and sharing within a community”, has been working with poor families of Laval's anglophone and multicultural communities.

Through his work and dedication, Mr. Young succeeded in setting up an organization which has constantly expanded over the years, and which has shown the true meaning of the term agape.

On behalf of the citizens of Laval, I wish to offer my most sincere condolences to his family, his friends and his associates.

St. Patrick's Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, few people in Quebec do not know someone who is of Irish origin. In fact, close to 5% of all Quebecers can proudly say that they have some Irish blood.

Between 1825 and 1829, even before the great famine, there were already over 50,000 people from the Emerald Isle here. The Irish were courageous workers who were exploited, unfortunately, but they contributed to major achievements in the 19th century, including the building of the Lachine Canal. At the foot of Montreal's Victoria Bridge stands a monument in their honour.

On Sunday, at noon, the 178th St. Patrick's Day parade will set off in Montreal. It is with pride that we will join the Irish community to celebrate its roots. Its difference has enriched the people of Quebec and, on behalf of the Bloc Quebecois, I am proud to thank the Irish community and wish them a happy St. Patrick's Day.

Wallace Shute
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay tribute to the life of a dear friend and a constituent, Dr. Wallace Shute. Dr. Shute was an exemplary Canadian citizen whose medical and literary contributions are recognized in Canada and throughout the world.

Dr. Shute began his lengthy and distinguished medical career in the field of gynecology as an army medical officer. His most outstanding accomplishment was the design and development of the Shute parallel obstetrical forceps. Designed to significantly reduce harm to both mother and child, the Shute forceps represented the first major change in forceps construction in over 400 years. In addition to his scientific successes, Dr. Shute was a true renaissance man as a published author, poet and painter. Dr. Shute was pre-deceased by his wife Betty.

I offer my sincere condolences to his son Christopher, his daughter Joan and his granddaughters Megan and Seonaid.

Taxation
Statements By Members

March 15th, 2002 / 11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in response to a question regarding the government's latest cash grab on blank CDs and MP3 players, the minister of heritage said the Liberals support copyright.

She must have problems with her memory. Her short term memory failed her when she forgot how the former health minister totally bypassed Bayer's patent for Cipro to help out Apotex, a company he had represented as legal counsel. Her medium term memory failed her when she forgot how she dropped the ball on the MMT file in 1998 and triggered a $13 million lawsuit by MMT's patent holder, Ethyl Corporation, under chapter 11 of NAFTA. Her long term memory must not fail her since she flip-flopped on the GST, is infamous for spending taxpayers' money, and is now making a nice try to rake in money on CDs and MP3 players.

What an MP she is. She does not care that intellectual property only applies to original ideas.