House of Commons Hansard #146 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was code.

Topics

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, that report says that when it comes to organized crime, the Mounties do not always get their man.

Why? Because two years ago the commissioner admitted that criminal investigations were being put on the back burner as officers were redeployed in the wake of September 11. Canadians are suffering the consequences of organized crime in their everyday lives.

When will the Solicitor General provide the resources so that the Mounties can get their man?

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is not unusual for the hon. member opposite to take what a report says out of context. That is entirely what he is doing in this case.

The fact of the matter is that this report balances the priorities for the RCMP, both in terms of public safety and national security.

As I have indicated earlier, we have increased the funding substantially out of the 2001 budget and added to it in the last budget. That is doing our job as we should.

Microbreweries
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

On February 18, the current Minister of Finance, who then aspired to being leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, tabled his budget. Although the Standing Committee on Finance unanimously called for the excise tax to be reduced for microbreweries, he ignored that recommendation.

Can the Minister of Finance tell the House if the several thousand dollar contribution to his leadership campaign from Labatt and the Brewers Association of Canada, which are at war with the microbreweries, influenced his decision not to reduce the excise tax for microbreweries?

Microbreweries
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, first, we agreed to approximately two-thirds of the recommendations by the Standing Committee on Finance for last year.

Second, at the time I made decisions about the February 18 budget, I was not a leadership candidate. I did not receive one red cent in contributions from the breweries.

Microbreweries
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few days after the minister tabled his most recent budget on March 8, the Globe and Mail published an article, according to which the Minister of Finance had spent several days in the Caribbean with Sandy Morrison, a Brewers Association of Canada board member, on a luxury sailboat chartered by that association.

Was this trip a reward from Mr. Morrison to the Minister of Finance for his refusal, contrary to all expectations, to reduce the excise tax for microbreweries?

Microbreweries
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Morrison is a friend. Unfortunately for the hon. member, who may enjoy fishing expeditions, I paid my own way.

During our trip, Mr. Morrison did not discuss the situation with the breweries with me. Prior to that time, he had made representations in support of the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Finance.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, in 1996 Darcy Bertrand was convicted of three murders. He murdered his wife, and his wife's mother and father. For each murder he was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to three life terms in jail.

Six days ago, after only serving seven years of three life sentences, Darcy Bertrand was transferred to a minimum security prison which is 15 minutes away from surviving family members.

How can the government defend this gross injustice and coddling of this convicted murderer?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, there is no coddling of this convicted murderer.

Within Correctional Service Canada there is an assessment done on offenders. Yes, sometimes they are moved from maximum to minimum facilities. It is done on the basis of the risk. The offender in question is serving his time as he should be.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the injustice gets worse.

Last year the government tried to do the same thing. It transferred Darcy Bertrand from a minimum security prison to Ferndale Institution, a minimum security centre with a four foot fence. The family cried foul and the government sent him back.

Then, this week the government moved Darcy Bertrand to another minimum security centre with no fence at all, 15 minutes away from the home of surviving family members.

On behalf of the families, will the government reverse the decision, send him to a real prison and show the families of this convicted murderer the justice that they deserve?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I would like to outline that any Correctional Service Canada institutions listed in this country are in fact real prisons. There is a loss of liberty and people who are incarcerated in those institutions pay the penalty for their crimes. That is the bottom line.

Through Correctional Service Canada, people pay the penalties for their crimes and that is what is happening.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, there are more than 821,000 women entrepreneurs in Canada. They contribute in excess of $18 billion to the economy every year.

Their businesses have increased more than 200% over the last 10 years. What can Industry Canada do to give greater focus to this great and important component of our economy?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, first of all, on behalf of all members of the House, I wish to express admiration and gratitude to the member for Parkdale--High Park for her extraordinary work as chair of the Prime Minister's task force on women entrepreneurs. She did a great job.

She and her fellow members of that task force presented a report today which contains important recommendations.

Today, the Prime Minister is making an announcement that, through Industry Canada, we are going to broaden and make available across the country the kind of services that women entrepreneurs need to ensure that this dynamic and essential part of our growing economy has what it needs for the success we know women will enjoy.

International Aid
Oral Question Period

October 29th, 2003 / 2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, last Friday in Madrid, Spain, the Minister for International Trade made an absolute commitment to provide $300 million to the people of Iraq for reconstruction. Already this week, there are murmurings that the government is going to renege on this offer.

Will the government confirm today that it will honour this commitment made only days ago to help the people of Iraq?

International Aid
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Chicoutimi—Le Fjord
Québec

Liberal

André Harvey Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the government has indeed committed $300 million for the reconstruction of Iraq and for humanitarian aid. Of that amount, $200 million will go directly to construction, in collaboration of course with all the other donor countries, with a view to ensuring the people of Iraq of a brighter future.

Housing
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Natural Resources.

In August of this year, the Prime Minister announced a program called EnerGuide, a federal grant program aimed at making existing houses more energy efficient.

In order to qualify for a grant, however, a homeowner must have an evaluation done of his home by an authorized agent. There were no authorized agents in place in Newfoundland and Labrador in August. There are none now.

When will the minister put an authorized agent in place so that Newfoundlanders and Labradorians can avail of that program? There is no point in having a program if we cannot apply for it.