House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was yukon.

Topics

Health
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, my department is responsible for the purchase of the vaccine. The government will indeed be procuring 10 million doses of smallpox vaccine from a Canadian supplier for use in the case of an emergency. The contract will also contain the necessary options to procure more if that is necessary, and the negotiations are indeed underway.

Human Rights
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is unacceptable that the government waffles and dodges as it has been doing since last October. The opportunity was there in October for Canada to speak out on behalf of oppressed people in Iran.

Nothing was said to, or about, the regime that buries women up to their necks and stones them to death. We are approaching another deadline this March when the Human Rights Commission will meet again in Geneva.

What message on behalf of outraged Canadians does the government intend to take to Geneva next month to halt the atrocities against Iranian people?

Human Rights
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I agree with the hon. member's description of these events as being horrible and unacceptable in a civilized country's behaviour. We brought this to the attention of the Iranian government. We will continue to raise these matters at the United Nations Human Rights Commission, as we have done in the past.

I assure the House and the hon. member that when we meet with our Iranian counterparts, if we have any discussions with them, we raise our human rights concerns with them. These are actively pursued by our government. We believe strongly in pursuing them internationally and bilaterally with Iran.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of the Environment. The commissioner of the environment recently released a report stating that there are literally thousands of contaminated federally owned sites across the country.

Could the minister tell us when we will see some action on this file? Has his department had a chance to review it and what can he tell us today?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is true that the commissioner issued a report on contaminated sites. Therefore, in partial response, the budget has included $175 million over two years, which is an indication of our determination to deal with the issue. That is in addition to the $100 million that is spent annually prior to this money.

I can report to the House that today in Sydney, Nova Scotia the Deputy Prime Minister announced that the federal government would be supporting the cleanup of the Sydney tar ponds with financial support up to the federal share.

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Cadman Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, Statistics Canada reports that auto theft has been increasing for years. The annual cost to Canadians is at least $600 million.

The police and the courts need help to investigate and prosecute organized auto theft rings. The Criminal Code does not specifically address vehicle identification numbers. This creates a giant loophole for organized crime. Tampering with a vehicle identification number must be made a criminal offence. Police have said so for years.

Is the Minister of Justice even aware of this loophole and when is he going to close it?

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows very well, we are in touch with members of the justice departments from across Canada with regard to the Criminal Code.

He knows as well that we are planning to move ahead with reform of the Criminal Code. We will proceed in stages of course. Each and every time that there is something in regard to the Criminal Code, we address those questions around the table at the federal-provincial meetings that we have. Therefore, we will have a look into that.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, according to the latest spending estimates, the Canadian firearms program will be spending yet another $21.5 million to develop a new computer system. This is in addition to a $35 million contract with CGI Group Inc. for a new off-the-shelf system. The justice department had already paid $400 million to EDS. It modified that some 12,000 times before deciding to ditch it.

Did EDS compete with CGI in a public tendering for this new off-the-shelf system?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I just do not know why they keeping asking questions on that notion of gun control. First, they should listen to the Canadian people. The polls that we have seen lately tell us exactly where they are, and they strongly support the gun control program that we put in place back in 1995.

As well, they should start to look at the statistics. They should listen to what stakeholders have said over the past few days. However, when they have a colleague such as the member for Yorkton—Melville saying that gun control will result in more crime, more injuries and more death of course we cannot support--

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Verchères—Les-Patriotes.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

February 28th, 2003 / 11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, recent media reports have highlighted the case of Simon (name redacted), a 17 year old from Varennes, who has been incarcerated in New Jersey, where both the language and culture are completely foreign to him and he has no family, for two years now. He has already served more than half of his sentence and could have been released on parole, or at least transferred to a Canadian prison.

Will the Minister of Foreign Affairs give us an update on what the Government of Canada has done, both at home and in the United States, to have this young man brought home as soon as possible?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I would first like to thank the member for his question and his interest in the welfare of the young Mr. Chevarie-Dudemaine and his family. His situation is obviously very difficult. We sympathize a great deal with his situation. We have done our job by visiting him and by providing this young prisoner with consular access.

However, I must point out that the process for transferring inmates between Canada and the United States is solely managed by Correctional Service Canada. As for the United States, the decision is made by the Governor of New Jersey. We will work together in order to—

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Skeena.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Andy Burton Skeena, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked the environment minister why he is so negative toward offshore oil and gas development in B.C.

Does the minister not know that the offshore oil and gas industry has a history of success around the world, from Alaska to California, Hibernia, and Aberdeen in Norway? For example, comments made in the B.C. legislature last week made it clear that the minister had no credibility with the B.C. Liberal government.

Why will he not admit that he is a major stumbling block toward development in B.C. and just sail off into the sunset?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the principle the government accepts and holds dear is that we do not embark upon industrial ventures, oil and gas development, without a proper analysis of the social, economic and environmental impacts of any such development.

It is not a question of saying no to the development. It is saying that if we wish to have development, we have to analyze what the benefits and costs from an environmental point of view might be. That is all I have asked for, that we have a proper assessment of the potential impact of this industry on the environment of the west coast.