House of Commons Hansard #75 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was sexual.

Topics

Claude Roy
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we want to pay tribute today to a great advocate for social housing, Claude Roy, an urban planning advisor with the Société d'habitation du Québec.

Honoured by one of the leading American housing associations, Claude Roy was awarded the John D. Lange award for the international impact of his work.

The first Quebecker and non-American to receive such an award, this man of conviction does far more than perform his role as a manager. Over the past 15 years, he has advocated the promotion of a healthy living environment and emphasized the need to recognize the connection between housing and the social needs of the disadvantaged, including the homeless.

On behalf of my colleagues from the Bloc Quebecois, I want to commend Mr. Roy on his social commitment and express our deep gratitude to him for his commitment to the advancement of wellness in our society.

Racial Discrimination
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is International Day for the Elimination of Racism.

I rise today to remind all Canadians about the meaning of tolerance and respect for one another. Particularly in these troubling and difficult times, when war and fears of terrorism are ever present, the issue of racial discrimination has become even more prominent.

Canada proudly stands as a model for diversity and openness, which has been a fundamental part of the Canadian mosaic since its beginning. Our national identity is linked to our cultural and linguistic heritage, where people from all backgrounds and cultures make Canada their home.

Threats to the physical and emotional safety of individuals cannot be allowed if we are to maintain the principles of acceptance that defines the spirit of our great nation. No one's identity or cultural heritage should be compromised.

I ask that all members of the House join with me to promote the fundamental belief that all Canadians are equal.

Racial Discrimination
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. speaker, today we join citizens around the world in declaring our support for the noble effort of eliminating racism.

Racial and religious discrimination have been the cause of too many wars and too much human suffering and any effort, be it by the United Nations or by individuals, to eliminate those two scourges should be applauded.

We pride ourselves in Canada on our ethnic racial diversity and tolerance, and well we should. Canada should continue to hold itself up as a shining example of what racial and religious tolerance should be like.

I am proud that in my constituency there are people from every corner of the earth and we live peacefully together and enjoy our differences.

I salute the United Nations and suggest the motto for Canada should be, “It does not matter where we came from as individuals. What does matter is where we are going together as Canadians.”

Racial Discrimination
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to call your attention to the fact that today, March 21, is the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

The Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women will be presenting the young winners of the “Racism. Stop It!” national video competition with their awards.

This year we honour 10 teams of 12 to 18 year old students: from Quebec, le Collège Jean de la Mennais et le Cégep du Vieux-Montréal; from Ontario, Norwich District High School and Glendale Secondary School; from Manitoba, Shaughnessy Park School; from Alberta, Amiskawiy Academy and Southview Community School; from Nova Scotia, Bedford Junior High School; and from the Northwest Territories, Sir John Franklin High School.

I would like to congratulate these young people for their stand against racism and for expressing their view with such great creativity.

Racial Discrimination
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, on this International Day for the Elimination of Racism, we remember the memory of those ant-apartheid protestors who were so brutally slaughtered in 1960 in Johannesburg, South Africa.

This March 21st is especially important as the grievous and devastating consequences of war on Iraq begin to unfold. State instituted racial profiling at the Canada-U.S. border crossings, harassment, interrogation, new visa requirements by the U.S. based on country of origin and targeting of members of the Canada Arab and Muslim communities and other minority groups are intolerable violations of human rights.

Federal New Democrats will continue to speak out against this racism fuelled by a war and anti-terrorism agenda that has even seen innocent people incarcerated.

We call on the Canadian government to uphold human rights, both internationally and here at home.

World Water Day
Statements By Members

March 21st, 2003 / 11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, March 22, has been proclaimed World Water Day by the United Nations.

It is an opportunity to remember that water is not something we can take for granted. It is frightening to think that, in this day and age, some people do not have access to drinking water. On this day, countries are invited to organize activities to raise public awareness of the importance and value of water.

This week, the Third World Water Forum was held in Kyoto. At the forum, which is also an important event in the International Year of Freshwater, the United Nations presented the World Water Development Report.

Each of us must do our part to preserve water quality. We must also realize that climate change, too, could have a serious impact on water levels. So, if the level of the St. Lawrence drops, pollutant levels will rise and water quality could be compromised.

Water is like the air we breathe; we need it to survive. Help us to preserve it.

Exchange Students
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I have the pleasure to welcome to Ottawa students from Guilford Park Secondary School who travelled here all the way from Surrey, British Columbia. They are in Ottawa this week on an exchange with students from D'Arcy McGee Secondary School.

These students have been given a wonderful opportunity to visit another part of our great country while practising their abilities in the secondary language.

I hope that they have a great stay here in Ottawa and I thank them for the great Vancouver weather that they clearly brought along with them.

Fisheries and Oceans
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, government giveth and government taketh away. In the budget the government bragged about all the money it was giving out for the various departments. While this was unfolding, it was asking departments to cut a billion dollars from existing programs.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has been asked to find between $15 million and $20 million. This means significant cuts to small crafts and harbours, the science branch and the Coast Guard, all divisions currently in dire need of funding.

This is inconceivable. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans at present cannot afford to deliver existing programs and further cuts will be devastating.

Putting money into one's pocket with one hand is always popular but taking it out with the other is only an action the government would take. Government giveth and government taketh away at its own risk.

Prix Montfort
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Carole-Marie Allard Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday evening, the first Prix Montfort gala was held to honour outstanding contributions to the Francophonie. All the award winners deserve our thanks.

The Canadian Francophonie can certainly point to a remarkable trail of achievements. Consider the winner of the Prix Montfort for cultural diversity, Rwandan-born singer Corneille, who fled the genocide, who reminded us how war destroys the dreams of thousands of children.

Consider Antonine Maillet, winner of the Prix Montfort for literature, who constantly nurtures our hope for a better Canada.

The creator of the Festival Juste pour rire , Gilbert Rozon, who won the Prix Montfort for event of the year, expressed his great admiration for all of humanity in these troubled times.

And what about the mayor of Moncton, winner of the Montfort of the Year award. He reminded us of our ability to meet the challenges of bilingualism.

I want to thank all the artists who helped make this evening a success.

Iraq
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, as we speak, Saddam Hussein's Iraq is under siege. The “Butcher of Baghdad” has scant days left to his evil rule.

Saddam has for too long been a harbourer of terrorists, a killer of his own citizens and a user and purveyor of weapons of mass destruction. Saddam personifies the new world's most evil threat, post-September 11.

While Great Britain, the United States and Australia together do their part to rout Saddam, we do not stand with our allies today. We stand in the shadow of the United Nations' failure to act. We stand aside because of a Prime Minister who failed to help. We stand aside, due to a Prime Minister interested more in personal popularity polls than safe, secure world order.

Shamefully, our Prime Minister is more ready to continue the “Butcher of Baghdad” and his evil threats, than to accept and help the most and the best of the free world marching to end Saddam's reign. God save the Queen and God bless America.

Iraq
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, France has been one of the countries most opposed to military intervention in Iraq. It has said, however, that if Saddam uses chemical or biological weapons, it would change its position.

If Saddam uses chemical or biological weapons, will that change Canada's position?

Iraq
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we will analyze any situation of any change of any kind in the future and we will take action in the light of Canada's interest, bearing in mind our responsibility for peace and security, dealing with our allies and the preservation of the international framework and system that we have worked so hard to date to build. We will take action as is required in the light of all of those considerations.

Iraq
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, France did not have to analyze a thing. It was able to put its position out plainly for everyone to see.

I attended a state visit to Mexico with the Prime Minister three weeks ago. While there he said to give credit to the Americans and that any movement on disarmament by Saddam Hussein was a result of their troops at the border.

Why is that message not being spoken loud and clear here in Canada?

Iraq
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the message is being spoken loud and clear but it is very difficult to get a message through to people who are ideologically disposed not to listen to it.

Iraq
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

The arrogance is incredible, Mr. Speaker. Of the 10 missiles fired at Kuwait, 2 have now been identified as Saddam Hussein's scuds. He said to everyone, he said to the world, “But I don't have them. They've all been destroyed”.

Does that change Canada's position? Does Canada now regret abandoning our allies, when the evidence is there that Saddam Hussein had scuds all along?