House of Commons Hansard #9 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was going.

Topics

International Transfer of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The Chair is satisfied that this bill is in the same form as Bill C-33 was at the time of prorogation of the second session of the 37th Parliament.

Accordingly, pursuant to order made Tuesday, February 10, the bill is deemed read the second time, considered by the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights and reported.

(Bill read the second time, considered in committee and reported)

International Transfer of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The bill will therefore stand on the Order Paper at report stage after second reading, and the notice period, pursuant to Standing Order 76(1), starts now.

Sex Offender Information Registration Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister responsible for Democratic Reform

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-16, an act respecting the registration of information relating to sex offenders, to amend the Criminal Code and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to special order made earlier, I wish to inform you that this bill is in the same form as Bill C-23 was at the time of prorogation of the previous session.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Sex Offender Information Registration Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The Chair is satisfied that this bill is in the same form as Bill C-23 was at the time of prorogation of the second session of the 37th Parliament.

Accordingly, pursuant to order made Tuesday, February 10, the bill is deemed adopted at all stages and passed by the House.

(Bill read the second time, considered in committee, reported, concurred in, read the third time and passed)

Amendments and Corrections Act, 2003
Routine Proceedings

February 12th, 2004 / 10:10 a.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister responsible for Democratic Reform

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-17, an act to amend certain acts.

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the special order made previously, I would like to inform the House that this bill is in the same form as Bill C-41 was at the time of prorogation of the previous session.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Amendments and Corrections Act, 2003
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The Chair is satisfied that this bill is in the same form as Bill C-41 was at the time of prorogation of the second session of the 37th Parliament.

Accordingly, pursuant to order made Tuesday, February 10, the bill is deemed adopted at all stages and passed by the House.

(Bill read the second time, considered in committee, reported, concurred in, read the third time and passed)

Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada for the Minister of Finance

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-18, an act respecting equalization and authorizing the Minister of Finance to make certain payments related to health.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Elimination of Racial Profiling Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-476, an act to eliminate racial profiling.

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to rise in the House today to present my bill. I thank my hon. colleague, the member for Windsor—St. Clair, for seconding the motion. I also thank the member for Burnaby—Douglas and the member for Acadie—Bathurst who are here today for the presentation of the bill.

The federal NDP believes that this bill to eliminate racial profiling takes an important step toward reaffirming the right of all Canadians to equal treatment under the law. We need a legally binding mechanism to ensure the accountability of our enforcement agencies and officials to all people of Canada regardless of their race or religious beliefs.

Racial profiling has been a reality in Canada since before September 11, 2001. However, since 9/11 and the enactment of anti-terrorist legislation, we have seen an increase in racial profiling and the criminalization of diversity. Too frequently, innocent people report being detained, harassed or singled out by enforcement officials based on nothing more than the colour of their skin or their religious beliefs.

This bill would be a step toward preventing racial profiling.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-477, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (change of title to Unemployment Insurance Act).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for Burnaby—Douglas for seconding this motion.

The purpose of the bill is to change the title of Employment Insurance Act to Unemployment Insurance Act. It needs to be given the fair and respectable title it had when it was created in 1940. It needs to go back to its original title. It was an unemployment insurance for people who lost their job. This bill will give this insurance its true title and the respect that comes with it.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-478, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (qualification and entitlement to benefits).

Mr. Speaker, this bill concerns the eligibility rules. In this bill, I move that the eligibility rules as set out in this legislation be changed to 350 hours or 20 weeks of insurable employment where at least 15 hours were worked each week.

This is the aim of my bill, because it is unacceptable, given the $43.8 billion surplus in the employment insurance fund, that only 33% of women and 44% of men qualify for employment insurance benefits.

This could correct this flaw in the legislation, which has meant that people are unable to qualify for employment insurance benefits.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-479, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (percentage of insurable earnings payable as benefit).

Mr. Speaker, this bill concerns the weekly benefit rate. The aim of this third bill is to increase the benefit payable to 66% of the average weekly insurable earnings, during the highest-paid 10 weeks in the preceding 52 weeks.

This would correct the problem affecting southeastern New Brunswick where investigations are currently being conducted. The whole problem related to time accumulation is affecting not only southeastern New Brunswick, but every region across Canada.

Basing benefits on the highest-paid 10 weeks would encourage people to work, instead of punishing them.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-480, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (length of benefit period).

Mr. Speaker, this bill seeks to amend the benefit period so that it is one week for each week of insurable employment of 15 hours, up to 52 weeks.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-481, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (benefit period increase for regional employment rate).

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to amend the term “remuneration” to exclude amounts received as a pension, retirement pension or allowance, vacation pay or separation allowance.

This will mean, for example, that if people receive a separation allowance they will have an opportunity to find other jobs, set up a small business on their own, or something of the sort. They are penalized under the act as it now stands.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-482, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (benefit period increase in the case of permanent layoffs of workers over 45 years of age).

Mr. Speaker, this bill deals with people who are 45 years of age or over, to whom I referred earlier. It has to do with financial penalties.

This bill seeks to ensure that employment insurance claimants do not have to pay interest or a penalty in case of the late repayment of benefits, or of a penalty imposed for a violation under the act.

This bill concerns the criteria for eligibility for employment insurance after permanent layoff. The purpose of this bill is to establish the necessary conditions for access to benefits after a layoff at 350 insurable hours, or 20 insurable weeks of not less than 15 hours each.

If a contributor aged 45 years or more is permanently laid off, and has been in the labour force for at least 10 years, the benefit period is increased by 2 weeks for every year in the work force, up to a maximum of 13 years.

The aim of this bill is to help those 45 years of age or more to find employment, because this is the age group that experiences the most difficulty in returning to the work force after losing a job.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-483, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (amounts not included in the earnings).

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to amend the term “remuneration” to exclude amounts received as a pension, retirement pension or allowance, vacation pay or separation allowance.

This will mean, for example, that if people receive a separation allowance they will have an opportunity to find other jobs, set up a small business on their own, or something of the sort. They are penalized under the act as it now stands.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)