House of Commons Hansard #40 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offenders.

Topics

Criminal Code
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, the bill talks about the public good and there is a bit of a definition of it. It says:

For the purposes of subsection (6), acts or material that serve the public good include acts or material that are necessary or advantageous to the administration of justice or the pursuit of science, medicine, education or art.

I have very little problem with it when it talks about public good including justice. Law enforcement agencies, lawyers and so on who are laying charges against an accused may have some of these images. It is legitimate. How about the pursuit of science, medicine and education? I suppose, to some degree, if one is training young doctors or nurses about anatomy, some of these things are not pornographic and they would be able to use that defence as having these things in their texts, et cetera, totally legitimately.

However I ask, and I do not usually use this word in my vocabulary but I use it now advisedly and correctly, what the hell is happening with arts? At what stage would the member say the public good is served by pornographic pictures of children in art? Where is the public good in that? I would like my colleague to give his impression of this definition.

Criminal Code
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I am prepared to cede the floor to the hon. member for Fraser Valley if he has a very brief response, but I would suggest that we proceed to members' statements and then come back to the issue of the day following question period.

National Volunteer Week
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, this being National Volunteer Week, I rise to pay tribute to the thousands of Canadians who give of their personal time to volunteer to help their neighbours and communities.

In rural communities volunteerism has quite literally been one of the pillars upon which our communities have been built. The helping of neighbours and the building of our rural communities would never have happened and could not be sustained without the contribution of those volunteers.

All those who volunteer give of their personal time, time away from family and businesses. These efforts deserve recognition and appreciation. Those who volunteer in emergency services where they sacrifice their time when called, assume personal risk, not to mention the risks to their business. It was in this spirit that Bill C-505, which will ensure equality under tax law for all emergency worker volunteers, was tabled in the House.

I recognize, congratulate and thank all volunteers.

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians in my riding of Calgary East are fed up with the Liberal government's culture of corruption.

What we now have is another abuse of taxpayers' dollars. In recent weeks, Liberal candidates have been spending taxpayers' dollars and not their own to buy votes. Between the turncoat member for Kings--Hants, the environment minister and the finance minister, they have doled out $225,000 so they can get re-elected.

Corruption, abuse of tax dollars and patronage are all becoming synonymous with the Liberal government. Canadians are getting sick of this.

In the upcoming election, it is bon voyage to the scandal plagued Liberal Party.

Senator Gérald-A. Beaudoin
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, Senator Beaudoin recently had to leave his seat in the upper chamber because he had reached the retirement age stipulated in the Constitution.

Appointed to the Senate on September 26, 1988, he carried out his role as a parliamentarian meticulously and with great dignity. During his career he has won a number of distinctions, including the Ramon John Hnatyshyn award for law in 1997 and the Walter S. Tarnopolsky award for human rights in 2002, and has been an officer of the Order of Canada since 1980. Senator Beaudoin has written a number of publications on constitutional law.

We are sad to see him leave the Senate and Parliament, but we are all confident that we will continue to benefit from his expertise. He is a great jurist, a loyal Canadian and will be known as a great senator. Thank you, Senator Beaudoin.

Arts and Culture
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is World Book and Copyright Day and on April 26 it will be World Intellectual Property Day. These are two excellent opportunities to celebrate the contributions of all the Canadian creators who enrich our daily lives.

World Book and Copyright Day was created to promote reading, publishing and the protection of intellectual property through copyright.

World Intellectual Property Day serves as a reminder to promote and teach the importance of intellectual property as a tool for economic and cultural development. This year the theme is “Encouraging Creativity”.

I encourage all Canadians to show their appreciation for the talent and passion that all creators invest in their works to enhance our cultural experience.

Vancouver Kingsway Constituency
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have had the honour to serve as the member of Parliament for Vancouver Kingsway for the past seven years. I want to congratulate all the residents in my riding, which is enriched by all the vibrant cultures in the world.

It has been a special privilege for me to work closely with many members of the community and various community organizations.

As their federal representative, I was able to seek government support in the areas of health, education, affordable housing, along with social support for families and senior citizens.

I was also able to seek government infrastructure money to build the Millennium Sports Facility and to rebuild the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. Every summer I worked with HRDC to create 78 summer jobs for high school and college students.

Congratulations to the residents of Vancouver Kingsway for their efforts in making positive progress in their community.

National Volunteer Week
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rex Barnes Gander—Grand Falls, NL

Mr. Speaker, as National Volunteer Week comes to a close I would like to take this time to recognize and celebrate the contributions made by all volunteers in our country.

National Volunteer Week is a time to say thanks to the 6.5 million volunteers in Canada who prove again that Canadians have the ability to give generously and selfishly of their own time and expertise in order to make the lives of others better.

Volunteers strengthen communities. Volunteering is an investment in our communities and volunteers are our most valuable resource.

Where would our communities be if we did not have the commitment of our volunteers?

Winston Churchill once said “We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give”.

Mother Theresa once said “Small things done with great love bring joy and peace”.

And a wise unknown author said “Volunteers do not necessarily have the time, they just have the heart”.

On behalf of my constituents and myself, I want to thank all volunteers for their efforts to make our community better and to make Canada strong.

Fédération des caisses populaires acadiennes
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour—Petitcodiac, NB

Mr. Speaker, I take great pleasure and pride in recognizing the Fédération des caisses populaires acadiennes, which held its annual meeting in Moncton last week.

I also congratulate the chair of the federation's board, Roland Cormier of Scoudouc, on his re-election. Roland Cormier has served this movement with energy, dignity and great success.

Roland Cormier is a real leader.

In addition, the new president and CEO, Camille Thériault, will provide vigour and leadership in coming years.

In 2003, the movement had the best year in its history. This financial institution is essential to the development of Acadia and it is in very good hands with Roland Cormier and Camille Thériault at the helm.

Armenian People
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Gilles-A. Perron Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week we witnessed a historic moment. The House of Commons voted decisively in favour of a motion recognizing the Armenian genocide.

Although the Minister of Foreign Affairs has tried to minimize the import of this motion by my colleague from Laval Centre, the fact remains that the representatives of Canadians and Quebeckers will have had the last word on the meaning to be attributed to this other tragic crime against humanity.

Tomorrow is the sad anniversary of the Armenian genocide of 1915, which claimed over 1.5 million victims.

The Bloc Quebecois sympathizes with the Armenian community and, together with them, we will continue to remember this event and remind future generations of it so that such terrible acts are never repeated.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

David Kilgour Edmonton Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, our chicken farmers in B.C. are facing the very worst: birds with a seriously contagious virus have been found in 31 farms in the Fraser Valley and about 950,000 infected birds have been destroyed thus far.

Even birds from uninfected farms within a one kilometre radius of an outbreak are being slaughtered in an aggressive effort to end the spread of this terrible virus.

At times like these, farmers in Abbotsford, Mission and the rest of B.C. need to know that the rest of the country stands with them shoulder to shoulder.

Ethics Commissioner
Statements By Members

April 23rd, 2004 / 11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, Dr. Bernard Shapiro has been chosen by the Prime Minister as the new ethics commissioner. His personal credentials seem impressive but we are singularly unimpressed with the method of appointment and the restrictions on his role when it comes to addressing ethical breaches of cabinet ministers.

The Prime Minister talks about the democratic deficit and giving more power to members of Parliament but in this very important matter, MPs are relegated to being as impotent as the furniture in this place.

Cabinet ministers are shielded from parliamentary and public scrutiny. Questions about ministerial misconduct will still be dealt with behind closed doors, just like in the old Chrétien days. Where is the direct reporting to Parliament on this one?

This whole exercise is just another example of appearance over substance. The Liberals want to have it appear as though they are addressing the deep ethical deficit in this government but they are unwilling to do anything substantial about it.

National Volunteer Week
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, April 18 to 24 marks National Volunteer Week, an occasion to recognize Canadians who devote their time and efforts to their fellow citizens. These dedicated volunteers are living examples of the value Canadians place on caring for their communities.

With increasing demands on people's time, it is important to salute the efforts of those who fit participation and service to others into their busy schedules. The Government of Canada supports volunteering through its Canada volunteerism initiative.

From boardrooms to soup kitchens, volunteers serve our communities in many ways. They coach our children, visit the elderly and help new Canadians adapt to our society.

On behalf of the Government of Canada, I want to thank Canada's 6.5 million volunteers.

Burma
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to condemn, in the strongest possible terms, the government of Burma for the prosecution and the subsequent sentencing to death of nine Burmese workers on charges of high treason. The charges brought against these individuals are on the grounds of making contact with the United Nations International Labour Organization.

One defendant received the death sentence for having been found to be in possession of a report of the ILO on forced labour in Burma. I had the honour of working on the ILO document, as did the Minister of Labour for Canada.

The prosecution of individuals for making contact with the ILO is a violation of fundamental human rights. We highlight the blatant hypocrisy of the Burmese government that pledged to work with the ILO to stamp out forced labour while prosecuting individuals on the grounds of treason for making contact with a UN agency.

The Burmese authorities must drop the charges of high treason against these workers and ensure that they are released from prison.

I urge our Minister of Labour and our Minister of Foreign Affairs--

Burma
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Rosemont—Petite-Patrie.