House of Commons Hansard #42 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was date.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I said, CSIS does operate abroad. It has the ability to operate abroad and collect intelligence in relation to any threat to Canadian security.

The Prime Minister has raised the question of whether we need to collect more foreign intelligence. The Minister of National Defence, in his former capacity, raised that question.

In the national security policy released today we talk about the fact that some of the questions we need to address as we move forward are the amount of intelligence, the kind of intelligence and whether we need to look at new mechanisms by which to collect foreign intelligence.

Port Security
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canada, the U.S. and other marine countries have to comply with a new international ship and port facility security code by July 1.

The U.S. government has given port operators nearly $700 million to improve security measures.

To the best of our knowledge, this government has not provided any money to maritime industry stakeholders to protect Canada's ports. Could the minister tell us why?

Port Security
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased with the new integrated approach to national security that was announced today by the Deputy Prime Minister.

The Government of Canada is strengthening our ability for surveillance, for co-ordinated on-water response. The ISP code, which we will meet on July 1, complements the strategy that has been laid out here. The code that we will put in place will meet and in fact exceed the international marine standard. We will have a North American standard. We will be there to assist our ports and our port facilities.

Port Security
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, the RCMP have been assigned to police only the three ports of Montreal, Halifax and Vancouver. There is no new money being allocated for additional port security. The RCMP will patrol only these three ports but the rest of Canada will be protected by commissionaires.

Why are Canadians being left unprotected?

Port Security
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are not being left unprotected. In fact, I would dispute that 100%.

The security of marine facilities is an important component of the national security policy. I will certainly be in a position to provide further details in the days to come. It continues to be a key priority in the overall transportation security.

I am committed to working together with our stakeholders in all modes to identify areas where improvements are needed and improvements are necessary. We will be there for our port facilities in the days and weeks to come.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

April 27th, 2004 / 2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in reply to my question, the Minister of Natural Resources said, and I quote: “The truth is that the unemployment rate has dropped in the region. It is about 8%...”. The fact is that the unemployment rate in the Lower St. Lawrence is 11.8%; in the North Shore region it is 15.9%; and in the Gaspé it stands at 18.3%. This is far from the 8% figure provided by the minister.

How can the Minister of Natural Resources and Skills Development arrive at realistic solutions that address the real issues when he is demonstrating, through his answers, his incompetence and his ignorance?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, I am in the process of examining the recommendations of Liberal colleagues who have formed a task force to review the conditions affecting the unemployed in the regions.

I will make the appropriate decisions once I have reviewed these recommendations.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, instead of showing his ignorance, what is the minister waiting for to implement the unanimous recommendations made by the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development in its May 2001 report on employment insurance?

We do not need another committee; we already have the answers. We have been waiting for three years.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, it is not Bloc Quebecois members who determine the government's agenda. They are unable to make positive recommendations.

Therefore, I will listen to my colleagues from the Liberal task force, who will make appropriate recommendations.

Supreme Court of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, for all his huffing and puffing about the democratic deficit, the Prime Minister's words have turned out to be completely empty. He said in a 2002 Osgoode Hall speech:

--we must establish a process that ensures broad and open consideration of proposed candidates.

That is just hot air because today we learn he will not even let Canadians know the background of candidates for the Supreme Court.

Why does the Prime Minister continually break his promises?

Supreme Court of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has fulfilled his promise to have a parliamentary review and that process is underway. That process does not yet allow for the exposure of private confidences which still remain protected. If a recommendation is made otherwise out of that parliamentary review process, we will respond to it.

Supreme Court of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, how open is it when Canadians cannot even know about the candidates for the Supreme Court? The background is hidden and the minister refuses to give it out in public.

The Prime Minister clings to this same old secretive process that has always been in place. He has had years to come up with a broad and open process. How does the Prime Minister explain his complete failure to keep his commitment?

Supreme Court of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, in my capacity as Minister of Justice I appeared before the justice and human rights committee and shared with that committee the protocol with respect to the appointments process. For the first time we revealed how comprehensive is the nature of consultations. We look forward to the report of the committee as to any further recommendations it may wish to make.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Oak Ridges, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

The Chinese national people's congress standing committee has stated universal suffrage will not apply for 2007 for the Hong Kong special administrative region. In 1997 Beijing promised autonomy: one country, two systems. This decision goes against that pledge.

Since Canada has championed and supported this approach, what representations will Canada make to ensure that China fulfills its obligations?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Oak Ridges for his question and his interest on this important subject.

We have always made it very clear that we believe that the people of Hong Kong should determine the political structure which is most suited to their needs in accordance with the democratic objectives which are laid down in the basic law.

We urge the Chinese authorities to ensure that the power to interpret the basic law will not be used to prevent political evolution in Hong Kong in accordance with the wishes and democratic aspirations of the people of Hong Kong. We will convey that message to all Chinese authorities at the appropriate meetings.