House of Commons Hansard #133 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was barbados.

Topics

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Batters Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, as Canadians can hear, that was no response at all to the question that was asked.

The rising cost, rising crust pizza saga continues, starring our very own immigration minister.

On August 10, the pizzeria so loved by the minister was the site once again of a lavish dinner for two. Records show a claim totalling $133. This is more than what a family of four spends on groceries for a week. The minister has also failed to explain two prior claims at this same pizzeria averaging almost $70 per person.

Will he stand up and explain to Canadians these outrageous—

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I have already given an indication that I invited members of the opposition to the same kind of lunches and dinners for consultation purposes but they declined.

I have had to go to Saskatchewan and to Alberta. I have met with premiers and with stakeholders, I have met with the mayors, with labour and with business in order to talk about the immigration issues that members refuse to raise in the House. I have had to go out there and do their job for them.

Clothing and Textile Industries
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance has already said he is prepared to put measures in place to help the clothing and textile industries. Yesterday the government voted in favour of a Bloc Québécois motion that proposed concrete measures on this matter.

Now that the House has agreed to implement an aid policy for the clothing and textile industries, does the minister intend to follow through promptly on this motion?

Clothing and Textile Industries
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what we indicated yesterday is that there are two sides to this industry: the apparel side and the textile side. A proposal is being developed to deal with the re-importing of product. We have been working with both sides of this industry since March to develop a proposal to which they can both agree. We want both sides to be winners.

Clothing and Textile Industries
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc motion calls for the creation of an aid program for older workers and the duty free entry of clothing made offshore with Canadian textiles. However, the parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Social Development said yesterday that the government would not apply the content of the motion in its entirety.

Can the government clear up this matter and tell us whether what the parliamentary secretary said truly reflects his intention not to apply one of these two measures?

Clothing and Textile Industries
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Belinda Stronach Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Minister responsible for Democratic Renewal

Mr. Speaker, the government is very sensitive to older workers. As the industries are under great pressure, we have committed and are still committed to working with the Government of Quebec and other provinces to develop a comprehensive strategy to address the issues of older workers and the competitive nature of the industries they are in.

Public Service Commission
Oral Questions

October 6th, 2005 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Bill Casey North Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, today the Public Service Commission finally announced policy changes that will mean that all jobs in Ottawa and all jobs across the country will be open to all Canadians no matter what their postal code.

I know that sounds good but there is a bad twist to it. The commission has added a new set of criteria that says that the commission is not required to consider more than one person in order for an appointment to be made. That means that if the manager gets 50 applications, he is only required to look at the top one and not at the others.

Will the President of the Treasury Board change this policy and adopt a policy which means that all qualified applicants will be considered for every job?

Public Service Commission
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as I said the other day, I appreciate the member's interest in this but I would point out that the Public Service Commission is not a government agency. It is an independent arm of the government and reports to the House of Commons.

If the member wishes to have that conversation, I would suggest he ask the committee to call the president forward and have a conversation about it. I am sure she would come and I am sure she would explain the system to him. I suspect he could then keep this out of question period and have a proper discussion with his employee.

Public Service Commission
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Bill Casey North Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, that sounds good but this is a government act. This is not the Public Service Commission itself.

As an example of what can happen, the President of the Public Service Commission testified this morning that the RCMP commission for public complaints had 40 staffing changes this year and 39 did not comply with the rules. One did and 39 did not. If we do not change this section in the act, it will only encourage more abuse.

Will the President of the Treasury Board move to change this rule so that all applications will be considered and the government gets the best employees?

Public Service Commission
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, it is passing strange to me that a member who professes interest in this has never bothered to talk to the President of the Public Service Commission about it. She is hired by this House, reports to this House and could be called before committee at any time.

The concern that she raises about the commission occurred under the old act, not the new act. The new act does not come into force until the end of this year.

I would urge the member that if he has concerns about this to call her to the committee and have a discussion. It has not been done yet.

Pharmaceutical Sales
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, a pharmacist in Ontario, who was apparently also operating an Internet pharmacy, was recently charged with selling counterfeit medications. In the meantime, another pharmacist was charged with selling bogus heart medication, which resulted in several deaths.

I want to know what the Minister of Health intends to do to protect the reputation of our pharmacists and the pharmaceutical industry, but most of all, the health of Canadians.

Pharmaceutical Sales
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that is a very serious and important question. The RCMP has investigated those complaints. The pharmacies that were violating the law have been penalized and those practices have stopped.

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Darrel Stinson North Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, for the past 12 years provincial attorneys general, premiers, child advocacy groups, the police and countless other agencies have begged to have the age of sexual consent raised to 16.

Could the justice minister explain why he thinks he is right and all these other groups are wrong?

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, first, I remind the member that he should check the record. In fact, the provinces, territories and the federal government could not agree on that happening. Therefore, what the member says is not accurate and does not reflect the facts.

With respect to the age of sexual consent, as I have been explaining, the government brought in the first legislative bill of this Parliament to deal with the area of sexual exploitation. The House fully debated the age of sexual consent and it was decided and passed by—