House of Commons Hansard #133 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was barbados.

Topics

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I was saying, there is currently an independent audit re-examining his expenses under way. Furthermore, should any discrepancies be uncovered by the audit, the government will insist upon a dollar for dollar repayment to the treasury.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, they are both fantasies, but I like Harry Potter better.

Why do this minister and this government continue to try to defend the indefensible? Holy sinking ships.

We see it. Canadians see it. Even Liberal members see it now. The member for Whitby—Oshawa says “it destroys our credibility”. The labour minister says, “I'm ticked off...Give me a break. This is ridiculous”.

That is right. We agree and so do the members on the other side of the House, so why does this Prime Minister not give us all a break, say yes to Canadians, yes to the opposition's demands, yes to his own colleagues, and just say no to David Dingwall?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we will pay Mr. Dingwall only what legal counsel advises us we must. There is currently an independent audit re-examining his expenses under way. Further, should any discrepancies be uncovered by the audit, the government will insist upon a dollar for dollar repayment to the treasury.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

October 6th, 2005 / 2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Jason Kenney Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, that is pretty pathetic.

Average Canadians are having great difficulty coping with the soaring gasoline prices. The government has done nothing to lower gasoline prices or gasoline taxes, but today it decided to increase the mileage rates for public servants and politicians.

Why is the government increasing these mileage rates for public servants and politicians? Why does it have the wrong priorities which do not reflect the real priorities—

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. President of the Treasury Board.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, the setting of mileage rates for public servants is done as a negotiated process with the national joint council, and I have instructed my officials to write to the joint council and ask it to reconsider the rate.

When it comes to politicians, that decision is made by the Board of Internal Economy, and in a minority House it is accountable to all of us, so if the member has a concern he can deal with it.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Jason Kenney Calgary Southeast, AB

Yes, Mr. Speaker, we have a concern, like most Canadians do, that this government has a double standard: one for politicians and bureaucrats and one for everyone else. It wants politicians and bureaucrats to profit from the higher price of gas and everyone else to pay for it with higher taxes.

We are prepared to cancel the increase for MPs. Will the Liberals do the same for the entire government sector and put Canadian taxpayers first?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Minister for Internal Trade

Mr. Speaker, as the President of the Treasury Board has said, the matter for public servants has been referred back to the joint council.

As far as the Board of Internal Economy is concerned, as a member of it and as the spokesman for it, this matter will be brought to the board. It has not been because the board tied itself automatically to the joint council decisions back in 1984, I believe, but this matter will be considered because we will bring it forward at the next Board of Internal Economy meeting.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, in addition to the increase in the price of crude oil, the sharp rise in profit margins for refining instigated at the same time by oil companies has been largely responsible for the current oil crisis that the government has to counter through support measures.

How can the government allow the oil companies, which are largely responsible for this crisis, not to pay the consequences and, moreover, to continue to benefit from $250 million a year in tax relief, as a gift of largesse from the government?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the fact of the matter is that a major component of our announcement today was action being taken by the Minister of Natural Resources and the Minister of Industry to strengthen transparency and competitiveness in the marketplace.

We want to make sure that the information on price fluctuations, the reasons behind those fluctuations, their size, their rate of increase and their rate of decrease, all of that, is laid bare for all Canadians to see. Then the appropriate consequences can follow.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister has put a plan in place and is making all taxpayers pay for it, but not the ones primarily responsible, namely the oil companies. As if that were not enough, he is giving them a gift of $250 million a year.

How can the ones primarily responsible for the current crisis not have to pay a single cent of the $2.5 billion in measures announced by the government, while all taxpayers, who are already penalized by this crisis caused by the oil companies, are once again footing the bill?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am afraid the hon. gentleman does not understand the tax system. He seems to imply that energy companies in this country, wherever they may be located in Canada, do not pay taxes. In fact, they do. The last statistics I saw indicated that to federal, provincial and municipal governments they contributed something in the order of $16 billion per year.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, the softwood lumber dispute is dragging on and the people of Chibougamau, Roberval and everywhere else in Quebec are waiting for the government to take action. A fifth decision by a NAFTA panel has confirmed to the United States, in no uncertain terms, that Canadian lumber is not subsidized.

Today the Prime Minister is in New York. If he wants to be taken seriously when he talks about softwood lumber, should he not send a clear signal to the Americans that he intends to support the companies by giving them loan guarantees so that they will be prepared to continue to fight this?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, our Prime Minister takes the softwood lumber situation very seriously. Furthermore, he has always said that NAFTA terms must be respected. The hon. member must realize that we have already implemented a program to help the industries.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, people in the softwood lumber industry want a government with a backbone, not a spineless government.

It is the Prime Minister's duty to inform Americans during his visit that he will support the companies, that he will give them loan guarantees, and that we will fight this to the very end. That is the only way we will get any respect.