House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was food.

Topics

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (Rural Development)

Mr. Speaker, the agriculture critic is off the mark, as she so often is in the House.

The fact of the matter is this government has been proactive in terms of dealing with the agricultural community.

Yes, we know there is a farm crisis out there, but payments from the federal and provincial governments have never been higher in Canadian history.

There was the $1 billion farm improvement fund in March. When farmers asked that changes be made to CAIS, we made three changes in cooperation with the provincial governments. The government is standing by the farm industry and we will continue to do so.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture. Due to weather conditions, harvest and fall operations on the prairies will extend into late October and November.

Farmers require own use permits in order to purchase Clearout 41, a glyphosate product available to them at a considerable savings. The PMRA has placed a deadline of September 30 for the issuance of such permits.

At a time of rising gas prices, escalating costs and low commodity prices, why would the minister take away the opportunity for farmers to purchase products at cheaper prices?

Will the minister ensure that the September 30 deadline is extended at least until the end of October?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (Rural Development)

Mr. Speaker, we have been made well aware of the issue that the member has raised. It is an important issue also as it relates to Ivomec, I believe, coming in for the cattle industry for treatments.

The various ministries that are involved in the matter are looking into it and we will try to deal with that problem.

Airports
Oral Questions

October 7th, 2005 / 11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Bev Oda Clarington—Scugog—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, Toronto city council, our own transportation committee and a huge cross-section of stakeholders, including the International Air Transport Association, the Air Transport Association of Canada and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, all support rent cuts at Pearson airport, but the transport minister's latest airport rent reductions hurt Toronto.

Today, Pearson pays 66% of all airport rents in Canada with just 33% of the passengers.

How many seats in the GTA will the Liberals have to lose before the transport minister offers Pearson a fair deal?

Airports
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Scarborough—Agincourt
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Karygiannis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let me just answer the question of how many seats that will cost us: absolutely none.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in New York City, the Prime Minister unveiled the arsenal he intends to use against the American threat to our softwood lumber industry. The Prime Minister needs to realize that threatening tones alone are not enough.

When will the government get it: loud voices alone will not make the Americans back down, and if it wants to gain some credibility it will have to back up its fine words with some loan guarantees in order to provide the industry with some tools to defend itself?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, it is true that words alone cannot settle disputes. This is why we have initiated legal proceedings to recover the deposits. We will be undertaking retaliatory measures. We have also stepped up pressure on the United States. As for other measures to help this industry, some are already in place and the Minister of International Trade is currently examining other possibilities.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, forestry and textile workers are not the only ones affected. Within days, several dozen former employees of the Port-Alfred plant in La Baie, in the Saguenay, will be left with no income, having exhausted all available resources.

What is the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development waiting for to implement a new older worker income support program to help workers reeling from the effects of closures in a number of different sectors of the economy?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Belinda Stronach Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Minister responsible for Democratic Renewal

Mr. Speaker, we are always concerned when there are mass layoffs. We are very sensitive to that. The department does have a program when there are layoffs that are coming forward. We work together with employers to make sure workers can get temporary income support as soon as possible. We look at programs to retrain those workers.

We are in the process of developing a strategy for older workers and are working very closely with the province of Quebec. We are meeting every three weeks to develop that strategy quickly.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, the number of murders by firearms in Canada increased by 13% in the past two years. The Liberal government's gun registry has cost billions of dollars but has done nothing to lower the rate of violent crimes. The security of Canadians is threatened, and this government is not concerned.

When will the government implement measures to allow Canadians to move around worry free in their communities?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite fails to understand that the gun registry in Canada is working very efficiently and very effectively.

In fact, law enforcement is making about 3,000 inquiries per day to the gun registry. The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police supports it. The Canadian Professional Police Association supports it. It is helping with respect to affidavits for criminal prosecutions. The licensing system has precluded somewhere in the vicinity of 15,000 Canadians getting firearms who otherwise would have firearms but are not eligible because of various factors.

Correctional Service of Canada
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, it has been well over three years now and the Treasury Board has not settled a contract between the Correctional Service of Canada and its corrections officers.

The labour minister has been bragging about his success in settling the short-lived CBC dispute. He said in the London Free Press that he brought the two groups together, read them the riot act and told them to think of the public interest.

Will the labour minister do the same for corrections officers who have been without a contract for three long years and are not allowed to strike?

Correctional Service of Canada
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I regret that I do not have the specific information on this matter, but I will consult with my colleague, the President of the Treasury Board, and he will get back to the hon. member on this matter.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Welland, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the acting Minister of Natural Resources. The price of a barrel of oil has hit record highs this year. This has created significant concerns for the people in my riding of Welland as well as many other Canadians.

Given the recent spike in gasoline prices, can the minister explain to the House what the government is doing to ensure that Canadians have access to the most up to date information regarding the price of gas at the pumps?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I would point out that information is power and information is ammunition. This new office, thanks in part to my colleague, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, will provide the best and most transparent information on why these prices have changed.

This will then be powerful ammunition for a beefed-up Competition Bureau, powerful ammunition for the media to expose price gouging, and powerful ammunition for provinces, which have the power to regulate.