House of Commons Hansard #145 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was price.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Jeremy Harrison Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, today we learn of yet another horror story in a Canadian aboriginal community. The home of every single resident of the Kwicksutaineuk First Nation has been condemned as unfit for human habitation. People are becoming ill as mould permeates the decrepit houses.

The community has lived under a boil water advisory for nine years. Will the Prime Minister admit that he and his government have again failed aboriginal Canadians?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the solution to the longstanding problems that face first nation Canadians will not be solved immediately and they will not be imposed on the community either.

We are working with the community in this case. We have been for years. We are making progress, but we are going to do it together with the community because that is the only way that the solution can be sustainable.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Jeremy Harrison Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, I do not know how many years this minister needs. Our first nations are living in third world conditions. There are currently 95 boil water advisories for native communities across Canada.

The Prime Minister said the gap between the health of native peoples and others is a “huge moral issue for us as Canadians”, yet the Liberal government continues to drag its feet while aboriginal Canadians are getting sick from drinking their own water.

What is it that this government is prepared to defend: its legacy of inaction, its incompetence, or its immorality?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, we have acknowledged that the living conditions for first nation Canadians are unacceptable. That is the reason why we are working with all jurisdictions and the community itself. We are meeting in Kelowna on November 24 and 25 to deal with this problem once and for all.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

November 1st, 2005 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, recent media headlines suggest that Canada's annual immigration target levels will increase by a maximum of 10,000 immigrants next year. It has been suggested that by increasing our target levels we will be able to help Canada cope with the challenges of an aging population, a low birth rate and a shortage of professional skills within Canada.

Could the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration please explain how increasing our annual target levels will help to clear the current backlog in the immigration system and convince more skilled workers to choose Canada?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, it is true there is a consensus around the country that in order to address the demographic imbalances immigration is one of the most important issues, if not the most important program at the government's disposal, as well as an economic driver for all areas of the country.

I want to remind all members of this House that we are concentrating this year on fixing a system, building capacity, introducing flexibility and bringing in new mechanisms in order to turn the department into a recruiting mechanism so that we can go out there and get the people who will respond to the labour market needs of our economy and we will be able to integrate and--

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, Justice Gomery wrote at page 47 of his report, and I quote “—Treasury Board no longer considers its oversight function to be an important part of its overall responsibilities”. He said, in short, that the Prime Minister, as the former vice-chair of the Treasury Board, and the current Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, who chaired Treasury Board for over four years, abdicated their responsibilities.

When will the government understand it no longer has the credibility needed to govern?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I invite the member to move beyond page 47 to page 430. Perhaps she has not had time to do so. At page 430, the report states, “Mr. Martin...is entitled, like other Ministers in the Quebec caucus”—and I add like any other member of the Quebec caucus, in order to help the hon. member—“to be exonerated from any blame for carelessness or misconduct”. It could not be clearer.

Health
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Michael John Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, there is growing concern about privatization within our health care system. Canadians are worried about having to pay out of pocket to see their family doctor for their next appointment and about how long they will have to wait to receive the treatments they need.

We need to assure Canadians that this public system of health care will stand the test of time and will continue to provide timely health care delivery to all Canadians. Could the Minister of Health please explain what steps are being taken to strengthen our public health care system?

Health
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the first step, in September 2004, was to provide long term, reliable, increased funding for a public health care system. The second step was to continue to reduce wait times, which is actually happening across the country in many of the provinces.

The third is to set benchmarks for those wait times where people have to wait a long time to get quality care in a timely fashion. Fourth, there is a very high degree of transparency in what the provinces are doing and they are continually reporting to their citizens as to the progress we are making.

All of those are steps that we are taking to strengthen our public health care system.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Independent

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, Justice Gomery today spoke about a culture of entitlement in the Liberal government. From information I have obtained, it is clear that this sense of entitlement extends to Liberal candidates as well.

In 2001, capital funding for first nations in the Churchill riding was cut by $15 million from the previous year. For the next three years, the Liberal candidate's community received $53 million. His community, which already had a school, got a new school, while another community that has 700 children living in portables is still waiting.

Why is this government's capital funding for first nations based on photo ops and rewarding cronies rather than dealing with those communities most in need?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the hon. member that the decisions made by this government as it reflects the needs of aboriginal communities are based on need. That need is real. We are acting on that need now and we will be doing that in collaboration with the provinces and territories at a first ministers meeting on November 24 and 25 in Kelowna.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I wish to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of His Excellency Paavo Lipponen, the Speaker of the Parliament of the Republic of Finland.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!