House of Commons Hansard #149 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was animal.

Topics

Mining Industry
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Davenport.

Italian Canadians
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of State for Multiculturalism.

During World War II many Canadians of Italian background were interned simply because of their ethnocultural background. Would the minister explain to the House what the government is doing to make sure that these tragic events are recognized in Canadian history, and through that recognition help ensure that it never happens again?

Italian Canadians
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Richmond
B.C.

Liberal

Raymond Chan Minister of State (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his excellent work on this file in the heritage committee. I would also like to thank the Minister of Canadian Heritage for her dedication, advice and support on this file.

On Saturday I was proud to sign an agreement in principle with the leaders of the Italian Canadian community to make sure that this bad part of Canadian history is properly and correctly acknowledged and commemorated, and that Canadians are educated about it to ensure that this kind of thing never happens again.

National Defence
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Thursday, November 10, I wrote the cabinet expressing my opposition to the purchase of $12 billion worth of military aircraft without any real competition.

Why the rush? The materiel procurement plan, which is to follow on the defence policy, has not even been submitted yet. Does the minister admit that he is preparing to spend $12 billion of the taxpayers' money only to meet an electoral deadline?

National Defence
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, this program has no connection whatsoever with an electoral deadline as the Bloc Québécois suggests. Instead, the deadline is our troops' need of the equipment required to do the job the Government of Canada and the people of Canada want them to do. We will continue on that path and we will obtain what our troops require. I would respectfully ask the hon. member over the way to wait until we have a plan before he starts attacking it. You have to see something before you can attack it.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I would like to draw the attention of hon. members to the presence in the gallery of the hon. Olayuk Akesuk, Minister of Sustainable Development for the Nunavut government.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Ways and Means
Routine Proceedings

November 14th, 2005 / 3 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Minister for Internal Trade

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 83(1), I wish on behalf of the Minister of Finance to table a Notice of Ways and Means Motion to implement certain income tax reductions. I ask that an order of the day be designated for consideration of this motion.

Order in Council Appointments
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, a number of order in council appointments recently made by the government.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to table the government's response to 38 petitions.

Telecommunications Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham for the Minister of Industry

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-73, An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (No. 2).

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Welland, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 16th report of the Standing Committee on Justice, Human Rights, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

In accordance with its order of reference of Monday, November 15, 2004, your committee has considered Bill C-16, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (impaired driving) and agreed on Thursday, November 3, 2005 to report it with amendments.

Canadian Products Promotion Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-440, An Act respecting the use of government contracts to promote economic development.

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian government buys goods and services worth somewhere between $40 billion and $50 billion a year. It is therefore the largest buyer in Canada.

This bill calls on the government to give preference to Canada. Over $3 billion in contracts and purchases are awarded and made abroad. In this bill, we are calling on the government to favour Quebec and Canadian companies over foreign companies. This would also ensure the survival of many companies that had to close their doors after losing their government contracts—there are many small companies in Quebec.

This bill promotes greater equity in the purchases made in the different provinces. The federal government currently makes two thirds of its purchases in Ontario. That said, we would reduce that to 50% and divide the other 50% among the western provinces and Quebec.

(Motions deemed adopted and bill read the first time and printed)

Canadian Forces Superannuation Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-441, An Act to amend the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act (elimination of deduction from annuity).

Mr. Speaker, this bill would stop the clawback when military and RCMP members reach the age of 65. When they reach age 65 the amount they receive from CPP is immediately clawed back from their Canadian Forces or RCMP pension. As well, for those who become disabled and have to leave the RCMP or military early, their Canada pension plan disability or any disability payments at that time are immediately clawed back whatever their age from their Canadian Forces or RCMP pension.

We hope to change that and allow those brave men and women who have served our country so gallantly to keep the money they so rightfully deserve.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Independent

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-442, An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (additional claims).

Mr. Speaker, as many are aware, there is an injustice that takes place with workers in the event that a company goes bankrupt. Often a fair amount of their pay is not paid out as a result of the bankruptcy. This bill would ensure that severance or termination pay arising under a collective agreement or legislation, benefits and other payments, including payments required to eliminate any unfunded liabilities of pension plans that provide benefits to workers, as well as commissions and compensation owed to contract workers get paid.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)