House of Commons Hansard #149 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was animal.

Topics

Privilege

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, I can only speculate that the member for Bourassa wishes he had never ever moved his question of privilege because rather than having one day of humiliation in his riding with his constituents reading this literature, he is getting three days of bombardment about the malfeasance of the Liberal Party in Quebec.

There is one particular phrase that I want to ask my colleague about. He was quoting from the Gomery commission and in fact from the leaflet that was circulated in the riding of Bourassa that says that the sponsorship scandal was channelling money in unrecorded cash gifts to Liberal election campaigns, which I have learned was in as many as 18 ridings. Would he agree with me that it is illegal to give unrecorded cash gifts to candidates in election campaigns?

Would he agree that where we come from, elsewhere in Quebec and from ridings like my own, the official agent would be in serious trouble, in fact would be guilty of a criminal offence, if that person signed off on the election papers of any campaign where there were illegal cash donations given to that campaign? That is out and out fraud.

Would he agree with me that the recommendation should be that any members of Parliament who were elected in the 1997 or 2000 campaigns under these conditions should be stripped of their seats, thrown out of office, and their official agents should be led away in handcuffs and put in prison for knowingly violating the Elections Act by which the rest of us are bound? Would he agree that it would be a suitable punishment to throw them out?

Privilege

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Madam Speaker, I think that the most negative effects of this situation are on the candidates who did not get this money. What is important is that we are speaking of about ten candidates in 21 ridings. A number of people have been tarnished so far because the list is not known. It is important to find out as soon as possible who benefited from this money.

The Minister of Transport tells us that the Gomery report ends everything, all is settled, they are absolved, there is no problem, and nothing more will be done from here on. But I think that the Gomery report should be an implement we use to finally clean things up. The people will decide in the next election on the legal steps that should be taken, if applicable. In this particular regard, Mr. Côté must be allowed to provide the list as soon as possible in order to clear those people who are not guilty and ensure that those who took money and did not record it suffer the consequences. Finally, we must see the real situation as it actually was and get to know these people. As things currently stand, the situation is neither clear nor transparent and it is impossible to determine the extent of everyone's involvement.

In conclusion, a member of the Liberal Party of Canada with an important position in the Quebec organization in 21 ridings accepted cash that he should not have taken and gave it directly to people, as he himself stated. The people who received the money did not have to account for it. This entire situation is due to the political involvement or is the responsibility of the Liberal Party. In my view, the Liberal Party is the main culprit and must take responsibility in the next election.

Privilege

2 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Madam Speaker, the issue is very clear. If the member does not want anyone to be smeared, why did he smear the member for Bourassa without waiting for the results of the Gomery report? These results are very clear in regard to what is in the householder and show very clearly that we were exonerated. Was he inspired by the member for Argenteuil—Papineau, who sent out a householder explaining the dirty money trail?

Privilege

2 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Madam Speaker, this is why we proposed a subamendment saying that our householder was sent out after the hearings ended. Actually, we were able to pass the same judgment as Mr. Justice Gomery. We said that some cabinet ministers appeared before the Gomery commission. These are proven facts. If the member for Bourassa feels uncomfortable with this, he will just have to live with it.

Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Madam Speaker, let us talk about sovereignty and Hans Island, which is halfway between Greenland and Ellesmere Island at 81

o

N. This 1300 x 1100 metre and 150 metre high rock was named after an Inuit during an expedition of 1871-72. It has fresh water, but otherwise is an inhospitable place.

As currents funnel ice down the channel between Greenland and Canada, it is a good spot for ice impact studies providing useful information for marine engineering. Canada-based companies conducted such experiments there in the 1980s, watching ice bounce off the island.

The channels on either side of the island are only 20 kilometres wide. In 1963 a big piece of ice hit the island and jammed up the passage on the Greenland side for two years.

There has been bickering about the sovereignty of Hans Island. We should try to get back to the days when Canadians and Danish groups used to leave bottles of Canadian Club and Danish Aquavit for later visitors.

Meanwhile, let us ensure Canada strengthens its sovereignty and makes a great contribution to the International Polar Year.

Justice
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Madam Speaker, the Liberal government is responsible for crime being exported from the big cities to our nation's rural communities.

We now have marijuana grow-ops, even in Haldimand--Norfolk. Why? Because the government's lax laws and weak sentences have taught criminals that it is worthwhile to target small towns.

The Liberals naturally try to escape responsibility for their own misdeeds, and now they are also allowing the gangs and drug dealers who are ruining communities and killing Canadians to escape justice. Canadians want mandatory minimum prison sentences for drug dealers, gunmen and the perpetrators of serious violent crimes. They do not want a justice minister promising social programs.

Canadians will hold the government accountable for the Liberal use of home jail and house arrest for repeat and violent offenders.

Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, I rise today to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the assassination of the former Israeli prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin.

The first native born Israeli prime minister, he was a general who waged both war and peace. Not only was he a military leader, he was also a diplomat, a statesman and a politician.

A consummate tactician, he had a leadership style that was said to be both candid and direct. His was a career that was marked by both successes and challenges, always focused on ensuring the security of the state of Israel. He was gunned down by an extremist at a peace rally on November 4, 1995, and he was cited by president Clinton at the time as a martyr for peace.

Mr. Rabin believed that peace was a prerequisite for the building and viability of the Jewish state. His legacy which was articulated in his memoirs and reiterated that fateful night was, “There is no doubt whatsoever in my mind that the risks of peace are preferred by far than the grim certainty that awaits every nation in war”.

May his words have meaning today.

Seniors
Statements By Members

November 14th, 2005 / 2 p.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week focussed on seniors' safety. This year's theme was “It's easy to make your home a safer place”. Seniors whose eyesight is failing or who are becoming less independent are most likely to have an accident at home, such as a fall.

Falls account for nearly two thirds of the injuries requiring hospitalization in persons aged 65 and older and more than 40% of admissions to nursing homes. They are the main cause of fatal injuries among the elderly.

Most falls occur at home. We must therefore pay particular attention to stairs and bathrooms, the two most dangerous locations.

Let us work to keep our seniors healthy so they will remain active in our society.

Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Susan Kadis Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister spoke in Toronto at the annual meeting of the United Jewish Communities General Assembly. The meeting is the largest yearly gathering of Jewish community leaders in the world.

I am very proud that the Prime Minister expressed his support for Israel. As he said yesterday, Canada will continue to press for the kinds of reforms that will eliminate the politicization of the United Nations and its agencies and, in particular, the annual ritual of anti-Israel resolutions.

I was equally pleased that the Prime Minister again spoke out against the hateful remarks made by the Iranian president. Canadians should be encouraged by the Prime Minister's message yesterday.

Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to condemn the remarks of the Iranian president calling for the annihilation of Israel.

Speaking to an audience marking Jerusalem Day in Tehran, an audience which contained known terrorist organizations, the president of Iran's words shocked the world and must be condemned. The Government of Canada should, at this moment, rally other nations of the United Nations in support of a motion to remove Iran from membership of the world body of nations until Iran explicitly withdraws and repudiates these words.

This is shocking and dangerous, and cannot be tolerated. The government must put action to words, take leadership and demand Iran withdraw these words.

Reproductive Technologies
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to detail how significant results are often realized by tenacious people whose efforts overcome extensive challenges.

We live in a remarkably unprecedented era in which technological advances, medical procedures, and scientific discoveries are being rapidly revealed in exponential numbers. One such method which has continually improved is in vitro fertilization. This technique has brought joy to many couples unable to conceive through conventional methods.

In particular, I wish to sincerely congratulate Kevin and Colleen Cook for their ceaseless faith, patience, and hope to have children as advancements like IVF enabled them to recently become the proud parents of special twins, Kasha and Gibson.

Annual Public Health Days
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, the ninth edition of annual public health days will run from today until November 17.

This major annual professional development event in Quebec public health draws doctors, researchers, teachers, students, nurses, social workers and many other public health professionals.

It plays a vital role in the acquisition of ever evolving scientific and medical knowledge, enabling participants to increase their effectiveness and expand their expertise.

The Bloc Québécois is proud of the commitment by all of these people to excellence in public health. We wish the event success.

Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the late prime minister of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin. He spent his life defending his people. Rising from the rank of soldier of the Palmah in the second world war to that of Israel's chief of defence staff, he partook in all the battles that shaped the young Jewish state.

But it was as politician, prime minister, that he truly made his mark in the region.

A hawk turned dove, he had the courage to extend the hand of peace to his adversary, Yasser Arafat.

He made agonizing concessions and signed the Oslo accords that broke the paradigms of the Arab-Israeli conflict. He made peace with Jordan and infused the region with hope.

Ten years ago, a Jewish extremist tried to put an end to the democratic process of the people of Israel by assassinating the prime minister.

However, Rabin's legacy of peace perseveres, as does our memory of this great peacemaker.

Government of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, this past week in the riding has been a new experience for me, even though I have been an MP since 1993.

I attended five remembrance services at which both young and old paid tribute to those men and women who paid the maximum price for our freedom.

The level of true appreciation for their sacrifices has never been stronger, but at every event I attended, the message I received was the same. My constituents are embarrassed and ashamed at the Liberal arrogance and disrespect they see. The fact that the Liberal government of the present Prime Minister takes no responsibility for the ad scam deception and scandal has shocked them. They are frustrated that the man who has bragged about being second in command, budget balancer, senior member from Quebec, vice-chair of the Treasury Board, and finance minister can say with a straight face that he knew nothing, saw nothing and heard nothing.

They find it inconceivable that this is possible and as a result want him removed immediately from power. My constituents, to the last person, say it is time the Prime Minister should go.

Health Partners International
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise to congratulate Health Partners International of Canada, a humanitarian aid organization in my riding, for its 15 years of dedicated leadership in distributing medical aid to over 100 countries around the world.

Health Partners International turns monetary donations from Canadians into donations of badly needed medical supplies for people in crisis around the world. For every dollar donated to Health Partners International, the organization obtains at least $10 worth of donated medical supplies, including brand name medicines from Canadian health care companies.

Health Partners International also works with Canadian doctors, health care professionals and NGOs to distribute the donated supplies on the ground, as well as with individual Canadians travelling abroad who agree to bring with them travel packs of donated supplies for local distribution.

Since it was founded in 1990, the organization has sent over $175 million in drugs, vaccines and other supplies to 111 countries. The agency is currently sending $2 million in medical supplies to earthquake survivors in Pakistan.

Once again, I want to congratulate the men and women of Health Partners International of Canada.