House of Commons Hansard #150 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. The hon. member for Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Quebec finance minister is a Liberal and has the same 20% standing in the polls as his party.

It is a replay of the same tape we have heard every fiscal year since 1998. Since then, this government's ministers of finance have been out by 300% on average in their surplus forecasts. This year is no exception.

Is it not obvious that the government is intentionally manipulating the figures for its own purposes and, in this instance, is doing so to buy votes and to make people forget its troubles with corruption?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I quote: “We are particularly pleased with the following measures: financial help for students; increased credits for workplace based training; the $1 billion for the fund for the provinces; $2.1 billion to sustain Canada’s leadership in university-based research and a plan to reduce personal income tax”.

That is what the Conseil du patronat du Québec had to say.

Parliament of Canada
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, in a few days, a majority of parliamentarians will express themselves clearly in favour of a reasonable compromise to avoid having an election during the holiday period. This would allow us to accomplish everything the Prime Minister says he wants to get done this fall. That is what Canadians want, and what the opposition wants. The only one too stubborn to accept this sensible approach is the Prime Minister.

Why is he refusing to compromise?

Parliament of Canada
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I already said there is no compromise on confidence. That is the answer.

Now, I have a question for the leader of the NDP. David Chartrand, of the Métis nation, has said that the leader of the NDP assured him there would be a meeting between the first ministers and the first nations. Is that true? If so, does he intend to keep his word?

Parliament of Canada
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a very simple way to achieve everything that needs to be done this fall, including the first ministers meeting with the first nations. That is for the Prime Minister to get off his high horse and compromise, to recognize the majority will in the House and what we had proposed in the House, which would accomplish the first ministers meeting, the work to be done during the fall, avoid an election in the holiday period and allow for Justice Gomery's report to be in front of voters when they vote.

Everything the Prime Minister wants to do, we are democratically requesting in the House that he do. Why does he ignore it?

Parliament of Canada
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, David Chartrand of the Métis Nation said at noon today that in a 25 minute telephone conversation with the leader of the NDP last week, the leader of the NDP assured him that the first ministers meeting with aboriginal leaders would take place.

The leader of the NDP is in a position to carry through on that promise. Is he a man of principle? Will he carry through on his promise?

Keeseekoose First Nation
Oral Questions

November 15th, 2005 / 2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, it is obvious that there is a cover-up taking place at Keeseekoose, but that is not a surprise because the Liberals do not want anyone to know what is going on at the reserve.

The Indian affairs department spent $9 million to build a school for only 250 students. How can a school for 250 students cost that much? We know that over $600,000 was stolen from the school account. How much of that $9 million for a new school was stolen from the children of Keeseekoose? What is the minister trying to hide?

Keeseekoose First Nation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, as I have said many times, the first nation reported this to the RCMP, which investigated. Charges have been laid. It is before the courts.

Keeseekoose First Nation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, bank records show that money from the St. Phillip's school account was withdrawn from at least five different casinos in Saskatchewan. In fact, in Casino Regina alone there were over 40 separate withdrawals totalling over $18,000.

When the Liberals heard these allegations of theft and corruption, did they call the police? No. They called a nomination meeting because they had just found the perfect Liberal candidate. When will the minister admit he is turning his back on the children of St. Phillip's school?

Keeseekoose First Nation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, this first nation did the appropriate thing when financial irregularities were found. It called the RCMP, an investigation was conducted and charges were laid. This is now before the courts.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, in 2003 the Liberal government was approached by André Demarais, president of Power Corp., to purchase the Skyline Complex. Even though public works was warned about the mould problems within the complex, the government went ahead and bought the building for $92 million without any open tendering process.

How is it possible that the son-in-law of a Liberal Prime Minister can show up and convince the government to spend $92 million for a building that is rife with rot without any public tendering process? How do they do that?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that public works, on an ongoing basis, monitors real estate markets to find the best possible real estate and office space for our employees at the best possible value for the Canadian taxpayer.

This building was purchased, was renovated, was brought up to standard for public servants and does represent both principles: the best value for the taxpayer and appropriate quality office space for the Canadian public servant.

Beyond that, the hon. member is basing his allegation on an unsubstantiated media report that had its facts wrong. I would urge him to call my department. We will set up a briefing so he can learn the facts.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, if he wants to talk about the renovations, let us look at these renovations. After spending $92 million to buy the building, to add insult to injury the government spent $82 million to renovate the building to downgrade it. Everybody knows the government could have built a brand new building for far less.

The minister makes hollow promises about fixing the rot in government building purchases. The truth is that the real rot that has to be fixed is the rot in the Liberal Party, those people who believe they are entitled to their entitlements. Is it not time that the Canadian people threw every single one of them out of this place?