House of Commons Hansard #158 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farm.

Topics

Economic Statement
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the correct figure is $538 million.

Economic Statement
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, in other words, we have just been told that the economic statement, seemingly so seriously prepared, contains a $200 million mistake. Does this not smack of improvisation? We do not want to hear that, just by pure chance, $200 million too much has somehow gone missing. Might there not be some millions more, as was the case with Human Resources in 2000? Hon. members will recall that a trifling $1 billion went missing that time.

Can we count on the other figures given in the statement, when there is $200 million too much for the agreement with Ontario. Can somebody explain that to me?

Economic Statement
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

No, Mr. Speaker.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

November 25th, 2005 / 11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Finance launched into one of his tirades in order to try to make Canada's stance on international aid look better. What the minister failed to mention is that Canada's share of its GDP devoted to international aid is far from increasing; it has, in fact, decreased over the years.

Does the Minister of Finance admit that, when the Liberals assumed power in 1993, that share was 0.45% of gross domestic product, while today it is 0.32%?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Barrie
Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I listened carefully to the hon. member's comments. She is an excellent critic and a strong supporter of what we are doing.

However, I need to draw her attention to the fact that we have received an 8% increase in our budget. That is higher than any other department in the Government of Canada. It will see our budget doubled. We have taken excellent initiatives. We received compliments from Stephen Lewis on our leadership in the HIV-AIDS battle. Many times it is the quality of what we do as well as the quantity. I am very proud of our record.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the question is very clear. I want only a yes or a no.

Was the share of GDP 0.45% and is it now 0.32%? Are those the correct figures or are they not?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Barrie
Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I am a bit confused, because I am not sure of the figures at this time. I would like to know where the hon. member got her information, in order to verify it.

As I have said, we are proud of our planning. As the Prime Minister has said, he can explain to Canadians how he plans to achieve the 0.7% mark. He will be announcing his plan and we will be there.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is on the same topic.

U2 singer Bono has said that he hopes his music will last for 100 years. I think Bono himself will have to last for 100 years if he wants to see the Liberals keep the commitment they keep making over and over again. In fact, they now will not even make a commitment to 0.7% of GDP for overseas development assistance, unlike many of the other more progressive countries in the world.

I want to ask the Minister of Human Resources, who is throwing a reception for Bono, how the Liberals even have the nerve to hang out with the guy when they are so distant from what he wants of them.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I am not sure there is any question to a ministerial responsibility but I do see the Minister of Finance on his feet.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, let me just make a point, which the Minister of International Development has pointed out. In the last budget there was an increase of $3.4 billion, which will serve to double Canadian aid to Africa over the next two years and double Canadian aid, generally, around the world between now and the year 2011.

In the meantime, we are also investing $342 million in special measures in relation to diseases like malaria, tuberculosis, AIDS and others. We are putting $500 million into global peace and security that is being used in places like the Sudan and Darfur.

This government is very actively engaged.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, these alleged increases come on the heels of the Liberals having gutted these programs in the first place, but the minister never acknowledges that.

He mentioned AIDS. I wonder if the minister or someone else could explain, why, in spite of all the hoopla about the Jean Chrétien AIDS in Africa bill, not one single pill has been delivered to Africa. People are dying every day and the pretense that the Liberals have actually done something about this continues.

Why do they allow that pretense to continue? Why do they not fess up and say that it was a fraud and nothing has happened?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, it was not indeed a fraud. As a matter of fact, as I made mention in my earlier answer, $342 million is going into the relief of diseases in Africa, specifically including AIDS.

I would also point out to the hon. gentleman that one particular area where Canada has been especially active is in the alleviation of the debts of the most heavily indebted poor countries of the world. We have put the better part of $4 billion to $5 billion into that over the last number of years. Canada was not a johnny-come-lately on that file. We were indeed the very first and we led the world.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, we could describe the Liberals' billion-dollar-a-day spending spree in a lot of ways: pathetic, pork-barrel and desperation come to mind, but we cannot say it is secretive. There is nothing hidden about this agenda. It is pure old-fashioned vote-buying.

Maybe there is one thing they are hiding and that is David Dingwall's severance. We understand that David Dingwall has now negotiated his severance deal in anticipation of a change in government.

Since the government is so very open about its spending, perhaps it could assure Canadians today that the amount of money it is paying David Dingwall will be made public.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, there was a very telling news report last night on one of the national networks that reviewed a number of the announcements that the government has made: labour market partnership agreements, new military equipment, help for farmers, help for softwood lumber, help for senior citizens, residential fuel, aboriginals and so forth. The reporter pointed out that the member's party, which criticizes the government every day in the House, has made not one commitment to retract any one of those investments that the Government of Canada has made.

I only take it that it supports every one of those investments.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians will note the evasiveness of the minister's answer and the fact that he absolutely avoided answering the question. Also, they will note the fact that before every election Liberals pretend to care about Canadians and after every election they only care about Liberals.

They gave David Dingwall a big, fat patronage post, they let him spend like a drunken Liberal and now they are proposing to pour even more money into the trough that Dingwall eats from, a public trough.

If the Liberals are going to do that, they should at least have the decency to be public, honest and forthright about what they are going to pay him in severance.

Can Canadians finally hear a commitment from the government as to how much--