House of Commons Hansard #56 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was equalization.

Topics

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased that after an entire year the opposition has finally realized there is some important work going on. This is an exceptionally important piece of work and one that I intend to do well, and that means it will be ready when it is ready.

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, while the Minister of Natural Resources considers pipeline applications for gas from the Canadian Arctic, there are still many unresolved disputes resulting from the last major pipeline that went through my constituency.

Just listen to the problems these landlords have had to face. In May 2000, landowners requested that the minister-appointed arbitration panel settle disputes. In May 2001, the minister finally appointed the panel. In March 2002, the panel finally began hearings, and in February 2005, there is still no decision.

After five years, can the minister not see that justice delayed is justice denied?

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Natural Resources works with constituency groups on an ongoing basis.

The hon. member mentions the Mackenzie Valley pipeline. There is a tremendous amount of work being done with the first nations in that community and with others to ensure that this is done in a reasonable way and in a way that takes into account the views of all those being impacted by the project.

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, it gets worse. We have found out that the entire arbitration process has been derailed after John Gill, one of the panel members, removed himself from the case before it was concluded. The Prime Minister rewarded Mr. Gill for chairing the last Liberal federal election campaign in Alberta by appointing him to the Court of Queen's Bench just a few weeks ago.

Five years of work has gone down the drain. Landowners are left with nothing. Why is the minister letting political patronage get in the way of justice?

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, that is utter nonsense. The Minister of Natural Resources sees within his mandate the need to work with all stakeholders. He does that well and will continue to do that into the future.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Christian Simard Beauport, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of mandatory measures, it would appear that the Prime Minister is preparing to allow auto manufacturers to decide on their own measures for reducing fuel consumption.

Does the Prime Minister intend to face the facts and admit that reaching the Kyoto targets will mean imposing mandatory measures on the auto industry and on other industries?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Richmond Hill
Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we are working with the auto sector to achieve a voluntary agreement. Clearly, if one is not reached, we will have to regulate, but the discussions are ongoing and I would ask the member to stay tuned.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Christian Simard Beauport, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government has already invested $3 billion in voluntary measures and yet greenhouse gas emissions have risen by 20%.

The Minister of the Environment went to California, where antipollution standards are among the strictest on the continent. If the Minister of the Environment learned something during his trip to California, will he admit that mandatory measures are needed for the auto industry, otherwise he is wasting his time?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Richmond Hill
Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, first of all, the auto sector has been a leader and continues to lead. I would point out that we are interested in reducing emissions, not just to 2010 but beyond. The Minister of the Environment has committed to that. The Minister of the Environment is working with the auto sector and with my colleagues on this side of the House, and again, please stay tuned.

Airports
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Andrew Scheer Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, in November the Minister of Transport told the transport committee that he would seek to scrap the plans to raise airport rents. Crown rent on airports cost the Canadian economy over $286 million in 2004 and that figure will balloon to over $368 million in 2006.

Under the government's plan, regional airports will have to start paying huge rental fees. The Regina International Airport alone will be asked to come up with over half a million dollars. The Regina Airport Authority fears that such a massive rental fee could result in higher ticket costs and reduction of service.

What happened to the minister's promise to stop gouging air travellers?

Airports
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am also worried about the airport rent and so is the Minister of Finance. The hon. member can count on the Minister of Finance to protect Regina.

Royal canadian mint
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, recently the Royal Canadian Mint entered into an exclusive contract with Tim Hortons for the distribution of the poppy coin. Taxpayers footed the bill for millions in advertising and distribution costs designed to drive traffic to the retail stores, a double-double for Tim Hortons.

Companies pay millions of dollars for product placement. However, for this exclusive privilege, Tim Hortons paid nothing, a big doughnut hole.

Why did the Liberal government give the exclusive right for the distribution of the poppy coin to Tim Hortons?

Royal canadian mint
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the hon. member that the Mint is an arm's length organization. It is pleased with the transaction. Perhaps more to the point, all veteran's organizations have expressed great pride and praise for the poppy coin. With all due respect, the opinion of Canada's veterans is more important to me than the opinion of the hon. member across.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

February 14th, 2005 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Ken Boshcoff Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry.

The price of gasoline in my riding of Thunder Bay—Rainy River is unacceptably high and unjustified. This week regular gas is selling for 93.1¢ a litre, while the wholesale gas price, including taxes, is 78¢ per litre. This windfall for the oil companies is coming at the expense of my constituents. It is shared also by many other ridings in this country.

When will the minister take up the recommendations of the 2003 industry committee to establish a gas price monitoring agency in order--

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Industry.