House of Commons Hansard #72 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was revenues.

Topics

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Richard Marceau Charlesbourg, QC

Mr. Speaker, representatives of the customs officers and members of the Quebec mounted police association appeared this morning before the Standing Committee on Justice, Human Rights, Public Safety and Civil Protection, where they told us that the Prime Minister was unable to give President Bush a guarantee that border security was properly in place.

How then, Mr. Speaker, can the Minister of Public Safety and Civil Protection continue to support the RCMP's decision to close nine regional detachments in Quebec?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I have said on a number of occasions in the House, the redeployment of RCMP officers in the province of Quebec is to increase operational efficiency.

On the more general question around security at our borders, we work with the United States of America to ensure that we are able to identify high risk goods and high risk individuals so we can facilitate trade and keep the peoples not only of Canada but of the United States as safe and secure as possible.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Richard Marceau Charlesbourg, QC

Mr. Speaker, how can the minister continue to say that it is not her role to review administrative decisions by the RCMP, as she did in the letter this morning, when section 5 of the RCMP Act states in black and white that all decisions by the Commissioner are under the direction of the Minister, that is, her direction?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, absolutely not. The RCMP Act is absolutely plain that the administration of the force rests with the commissioner of the force. As I have said before, I do not involve myself in operational matters, but I will say one more time for the individual involved, the hon. member, that the redeployment of officers, the same number of officers in the province in Quebec, are being redeployed so they are more effective as a modern 21st century police force.

Air-India
Oral Question Period

March 22nd, 2005 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, what an oddity. The Liberals were the ones calling for an inquiry into the Air-India disaster when they were in the opposition. It was none other than the former Liberal leader, John Turner, who called for a royal commission into this tragedy. Now the Deputy Prime Minister's stalling tactics are another example of what Liberals are becoming famous for: promises made, promises broken.

Three hundred and thirty-one lives have been lost. For their sake and memory, an inquiry is a must. Will the government call an inquiry if an appeal is not lodged?

Air-India
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the member has an unfortunate tendency to take this horrible tragedy, which we all acknowledge, and turn it into a partisan debate. I simply will say this to the hon. member. He brought up the leader of the official opposition, John Turner. I wonder why the Progressive Conservative Party at the time did not call an inquiry.

Air-India
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, there was a police investigation.

The current Liberal health minister, Liberal Indo-Canadian MPs, former senior Liberal ministers Herb Dhaliwal, Brian Tobin, Sergio Marchi and Herb Gray have all called for an inquiry. Why is the Deputy Prime Minister not getting the message? Is there a hidden agenda here?

If an inquiry is not held, the victims' families and Canadians in general will point their fingers at the government and say that it has something to hide. What does it have to hide?

Air-India
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, again, most of us would appreciate the fact that there is nothing hidden after the longest criminal trial in the history of the country.

Let me reiterate again that I have offered to meet with the families. I have offered senior government officials and relevant agencies, CSIS and the RCMP. We have offered to sit down and identify remaining questions that have not been answered. At that point I am more than willing to think about what process is possible to answer any remaining unanswered questions.

Pharmaceutical Industry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Wajid Khan Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, this year Canadians have seen dramatic examples of how difficult it can be for consumers to access information for the safety of pharmaceuticals. Could the Minister of Health tell us what work he is doing to help ensure Canadians have access to both safe drugs and safety information about drugs on the market?

Pharmaceutical Industry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I have called for the clinical trials to be more transparent and open so all Canadians know the good, the bad and the ugly of clinical trials. I have also written to the Standing Committee on Health to look at potential options for improving the drug safety and transparency in the drug approval process.

I also said in February that I had asked the department to look at a variety of options for improving the drug transparency, approval process and the post-market surveillance. We are going to be producing a discussion paper on mandatory adverse reaction reporting. We are going to change the culture of drug approval in the country.

Transport
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Bill Casey North Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Digby wharf scandal in Nova Scotia has started to compete with ad scam scandal for waste and accountability. The MacDonnell Group holds the record for consulting fees by charging 4,068 hours to the project. There was no accountability and nothing to show for the money. That is more hours than were charged by either the Lafleur group or the Gosselin group in the sponsorship scandal.

What will the minister do to try to find out where the $3 million went and what will he do to get the wharf back to the people of Digby?

Transport
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the member has to know that this question is before the courts so we cannot answer it. However, I feel a lot of sympathy for the people of Digby who are stuck with that group.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, officials from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans recently confirmed what we have been saying for years. Foreign fishing companies continue to break fishing regulations in the NAFO regulated zone. Skippers and crews are even rewarded for breaking the law by using illegal gear and catching species under moratoria.

Canada pays half the cost of operating NAFO and yet the government sits by and says absolutely nothing while abuses go on and on. He who pays the piper should call the tune.

When will the minister put his mouth where his money is?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, my hon. colleague ought to know that the Prime Minister of the government and I take this issue very seriously. We have fought hard on the issue of overfishing. In fact, our strategy is seeing results.

Both the Prime Minister and myself have raised it at the UN. Last year we had more than 240 inspections, an increase of some 50% over the previous year. We saw a drop of about 32% in the number of infractions last year. We are seeing results from our strategies.

It is a shame the member was muzzled and did not rise to vote in the House for the budget that contained money to fight overfishing.

Shipping
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, when its vessel Ferbec was sold, Canada Steamship Lines suspected it was headed for scrap, and Montreal port authorities have confirmed this. Yet, notwithstanding its Basel Convention responsibilities, Transport Canada carried out a pre- and post-sale inspection and issued the authorizations regardless, knowing it was going to be scrapped.

How, given these revelations, can the Minister of Transport claim that all requirements and all international standards were met before Ferbec left Canada?