House of Commons Hansard #103 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was development.

Topics

Social Development
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, they do not want to listen, but it does not matter. Negotiations are continuing. We will continue to negotiate, and we will achieve the same results that we achieved with the other five provinces. We will sign an agreement.

Foreign Credentials
Oral Question Period

May 20th, 2005 / 11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Race Relations Foundation states that the refusal to recognize foreign credentials by professional bodies amounts to systematic racism. Since 1993 we have been calling to address this issue. We still do not have any evident action from the government, just lip service. Why? Why no action?

Foreign Credentials
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, through the foreign credentials recognition program, we are working with the provinces, the territories, regulators, sector councils, professional associations and others to improve the recognition of work experience, credentials and skills obtained overseas.

We have committed $68 million already to improve foreign credentials recognition. Significant progress is being made, especially in the areas of health care for nurses and physicians, as well as in engineering.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Daryl Kramp Prince Edward—Hastings, ON

Mr. Speaker, the First Nations Technical Institute in my riding is one of Canada's leading colleges in its field. However, its very survival is seriously threatened by a cutback in the government's funding. Layoffs are taking place as we speak. Students in multi-year programs are being left on the streets and this shining star in aboriginal education is on the verge of collapse and closure.

Will the Minister of Indian Affairs commit today to fully, and I do mean fully, restore the first nations funding in Tyendinaga?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Western Arctic
Northwest Territories

Liberal

Ethel Blondin-Andrew Minister of State (Northern Development)

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to improving education for first nations students. It has been part of the round table process. We have already committed $1 million this year to the First Nations Technical Institute to support the ongoing post-secondary program.

The officials have reviewed the institute's business plan and we are giving consideration to a new proposal for an estimated additional $600,000 in programming support.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is also for the Minister of State for Northern Development.

On April 19, 2004 aboriginal leaders met with federal ministers and parliamentarians, including the Prime Minister, to discuss how we could work together to improve the lives of aboriginal people.

The government said it was committed to changing the way we deal with aboriginal people. What action has the government taken since the round table toward meaningful change for aboriginal Canadians?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Western Arctic
Northwest Territories

Liberal

Ethel Blondin-Andrew Minister of State (Northern Development)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister restated his commitment to meet later this month with the national aboriginal leadership. Over the past year, follow-up sessions have taken place on six key policy priority areas identified by the round table on health, education, lifelong learning, housing, economic opportunities, negotiations and accountabilities for results.

At our upcoming policy retreat, we look forward to discussing the next steps in our renewed relationship with aboriginal Canadians. Together we are closing the gap between--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Dewdney—Alouette, BC

Mr. Speaker, when the fisheries committee tabled its report on the disastrous 2004 sockeye salmon fishery, it included, along with its 12 unanimous recommendations, a request for a response within 60 days. It did so because of the concern that some serious problems needed to be corrected before the 2005 season.

Those 60 days expire tomorrow. Will the minister tell us today if he is going to continue to ignore us or is he going to implement our recommendations?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I have indicated previously that I appreciated the work of the committee and its report. I reviewed it and we will table a response in due course.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Dewdney—Alouette, BC

Mr. Speaker, we can only wish that the government would work as hard to ensure the survival of Pacific salmon as it does to its own survival.

Our report and the post-season review of Justice Williams highlighted the fact that there was a serious problem with enforcement and called for increased enforcement efforts. However, an internal DFO document reveals that there is a plan to reduce the number of fisheries officers in the Pacific region, so we are very concerned about the future of this resource.

Why is the minister continuing to refuse to fix the problem and make a real commitment to enforcement on the Fraser River?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, my hon. colleague knows that what he is saying is not actually accurate. That is not how it will work. He knows, for example, that we are focusing efforts on the Fraser River. We will not be focusing as much perhaps on dealing with cottagers and their docks or with farmers and their culverts. We do want to focus on the important issues of the Fraser River fishery, for example.

Guaranteed Income Supplement
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Marcel Gagnon Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, once again, the interests of Quebec are not being served. Over the past 12 years, seniors have been denied money to which they are entitled. This government brags about the money it is allocating for seniors in its budget, and yet, it still refuses to reimburse the 68,000 seniors who have been deprived the guaranteed income supplement.

How can the Prime Minister throw billions of dollars about, here, there and everywhere when he owes so much money to seniors?

Guaranteed Income Supplement
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Trinity—Spadina
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Ianno Minister of State (Families and Caregivers)

Mr. Speaker, I know of the member's interest in seniors as we spoke earlier this week. However, he is also very much aware that the government is committed to ensuring that low income seniors have more opportunities in our society. In the budget, which he unfortunately voted against last night, the $2.7 billion over five years for low income seniors, especially in his region, will be very beneficial to many of the people who want to have the standard of living as he does.

Economic Development
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, people are increasingly surprised to see the Bloc Québécois insist on opposing Bill C-9, which will facilitate access to federal funding to help regions suffering economic difficulties.

Can the minister explain how the Bloc Québécois' systematic obstruction might harm the economic development of the regions of Quebec?