House of Commons Hansard #118 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was salmon.

Topics

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Marcel Proulx)

Does the hon. member have unanimous consent?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Raymond Simard Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 147, 149 and 154.

Question No. 147
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

Do any of the terms of the first ministers health accords of 2003 and 2004 prohibit or discourage the provinces from contracting with privately owned health care clinics for the delivery of publicly funded, medically necessary health care services?

Question No. 147
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

The 2003 first ministers accord on health care renewal, February 2003, and the 2004 first ministers 10 year plan to strengthen health care, September 2004, do not deal with the issue of private care.

However, in both of these accords, first ministers reaffirmed their commitment to the five principles of health care insurance as described in the Canada Health Act, namely those of public administration, comprehensiveness, universality, portability and accessibility. For both accords, first ministers agreed to ensure that timely access to medically necessary health services is based on need, not ability to pay. This means that all medically necessary hospital services and all medically required physician services are available to insured residents of a province or territory on a prepaid basis, that is, without direct charges to insured persons.

In addition, the 10 year plan includes funding of $41 billion to meet the funding recommendations of the Romanow report and builds on the 2003 accord which provided $27 billion over five years to ensure timely access to quality health care. The 2004 10 year plan also includes a commitment to the Canada Health Act dispute avoidance and resolution mechanism that requires the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work collaboratively to avoid and resolve intergovernmental disputes while respecting the legislative provisions of the governments involved.

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

June 17th, 2005 / 12:45 p.m.

Conservative

Bill Casey North Nova, NS

With respect to rail passengers communicating with the Canadian Transportation Agency regarding improvements to the Renaissance rail cars, owned and operated by VIA Rail Canada, how many: ( a ) from all parts of Canada, have concerns regarding limited amounts of space aboard the Renaissance rail car; ( b ) have originated from Atlantic Canada and travel on the Halifax to Montreal rail line; ( c ) have noted concerns about the purchase of a rail car designed for European rail networks being used on the Canadian rail network; and ( d ) are senior citizens?

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Scarborough—Agincourt
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Karygiannis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

In response to (a), the Canadian Transportation Agency has received three formal applications concerning the Renaissance cars owned and operated by VIA Rail Canada Inc. Each of the three applications has raised concerns regarding limited amount of space aboard the Renaissance rail car.

In response to (b), none of the applications have originated from Atlantic Canada or as a result of travel on the Halifax to Montreal rail line.

In response to (c), one of the above noted formal applications has noted concerns about the purchase of rail cars designed for European rail networks and being used on the Canadian rail network.

In response to (d), the agency does not ask a person’s age when an application is received and therefore does not know if any of the applicants or if any of the persons who made inquiries or comments are senior citizens.

Question No. 154
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

What were the criteria used by VIA Rail Canada in the awarding of contrats from 1994 to 2004, including all changes that may have occurred during that same time period?

Question No. 154
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Scarborough—Agincourt
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Karygiannis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, from 1994 to 2004, the criteria used by VIA Rail Canada Inc. in awarding contracts are:

The purchase of goods and services must be carried out in a manner that results in the best value to the corporation when considering price, quality, service availability and operational performances. Purchasing quality goods and services implies purchasing only those products for which VIA has a clear need and which are the least expensive to perform satisfactorily their intended function. In evaluating and selecting the least expensive product to perform the intended function, generally the following factors are taken into account: purchase price, life expectancy, operating and installation costs, risk of failure and additional costs associated with failure, et cetera. In evaluating and selecting service providers, consideration shall be given to the following: cost, past experience, solvency and reputation of firm, ability to deliver results on time, qualification of personnel, knowledge of rail passenger business, adherence to and understanding of the terms of reference.

There were no changes to the above criteria over the specified period, however additional internal procedures were implemented in 2003 and 2004 to strengthen the controls associated with the contracting for goods and services.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Raymond Simard Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Questions Nos. 144 and 146 could be made orders for returns, these returns would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Marcel Proulx)

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 144
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

How many person-years have been allocated and what has been the total cost spent by both Foreign Affairs Canada and International Trade Canada, for each year since 1994, for the following activities: ( a ) organizing, operating and participating in the National Committee on Firearms; ( b ) formulating, implementing and administering the Canadian Plan of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons; ( c ) developing and implementing the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects; ( d ) developing and implementing the Protocol against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Components and Ammunition, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime; ( e ) developing and implementing the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Document on Small Arms and Light Weapons; ( f ) developing and implementing the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials (Inter-American Convention), signed by Canada in November 1997; ( g ) developing and implementing the European Union (EU) Joint Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons adopted by the EU States on December 17, 1998; ( h ) developing and implementing the EU Code of Conduct on Arms Exports adopted by the EU States; ( i ) planning and participating in the Small Arms Survey 2001 and 2002; ( j ) participating in the planning, implementing and administering the Canadian Firearms Program, the Firearms Act and regulations and Part III of the Criminal Code; and ( k ) processing and issuing import and export permits for firearms and related products?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 146
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

For groups under its direct jurisdiction (for example, Aboriginal Persons, RCMP, veterans, prisoners), does the government make payments to any privately-owned clinics, including the Shouldice Hernia Centre in Thornhill, Ontario, for the delivery of medically necessary health care services and if so, how much did the government pay for such services in 2003 and 2004 and at which clinics?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 146
Routine Proceedings

12:45 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Simard Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, I ask that the remaining question be allowed to stand.