House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, another day goes by, another day of inaction from the government and high gas prices.

According to an internal 1999 Environment Canada study, the government felt that Canadians should be paying $1.40 per litre for gasoline. Has the Prime Minister stopped trying to implement this secret report or will he continue to gouge Canadians at the pumps?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member would consult with some of her own colleagues, including perhaps the member for Medicine Hat, he could explain to her that the cause of the recent spike in gasoline prices is international market circumstances. The tax has not changed. The federal taxes are the same now as they were in 1995.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is only now that we are learning about the Liberal hidden agenda on high gas prices. The Calgary Herald revealed this in an interview with the environment minister. He said that high gas prices were actually good for Canada.

Will the Prime Minister admit that his environment minister is wrong, listen to Canadians and help them with the out of control cost of gas?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is misquoting me. She would be unable to say that I have said that. It is not a quote.

What is true though is that we have structural growth of the energy costs. We need to be more energy efficient. The climate change plan that we have is a plan for efficient energy. The Conservative Party is against it. Canadians should not support a party that wants to go in the wrong direction.

Official Languages Act
Oral Questions

September 28th, 2005 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, protecting the linguistic rights of minorities is important to our government. That being said, what does the minister think of the Bloc members' comments on Bill S-3?

Official Languages Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Minister for Internal Trade

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois is true to itself. When problems arise in applying the Official Languages Act—and they do arise and we do address them—they blow them out of proportion.

Nevertheless, when the Commissioner of Official Languages says that progress has been made over the past 35 years in every area affecting the country's linguistic communities, we do not hear a peep from the Bloc.

As far as the Quebec anglophone community is concerned let me say this. As far as this government is concerned the linguistic minority of Quebec will always be covered by the Official Languages Act.

Government of Canada
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the government House leader.

We showed up in this session ready to get to work and ready to get something done for Canadians. What did we get? We got a do nothing legislative agenda that is filled with housekeeping bills, committee reports and even leftovers from the Chrétien years.

I have a very straightforward question. Does the government have a priority for the fall, and if so, where is it and what is it?

Government of Canada
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, there is no doubt that our agenda in this particular sitting will work toward emphasizing and building the priorities of a 21st century economy, protecting and strengthening our social foundations and continuing to ensure that Canada enjoys a role of pride and influence in this world. We will have an update from the Minister of Finance who will reinforce our well-earned reputation for sound fiscal management, moving forward on measures to enhance growth and prosperity and foster Canada's economic competitiveness. I could go on and on but I know my time is over.

Electoral Reform
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Ed Broadbent Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the deputy House leader.

We have just heard another example of empty rhetoric. Last June the deputy House leader promised there would be action taken so we could begin the serious process of electoral reform by next Monday at the latest. Nothing happened over the summer.

Is this not another extraordinary example of the cynicism and empty rhetoric of the government that the people of Canada want removed from politics?

Electoral Reform
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Minister for Internal Trade

Mr. Speaker, I can understand the eagerness of some members of the House to proceed with electoral reform.

Let me say that when the question came up in June about this matter, I had given assurances to the member that the government would take the report very seriously. The government will table its response to that report on or before October 20, as per House rules, and I believe members will see that the government indeed is treating it very seriously.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Dean Allison Niagara West—Glanbrook, ON

Mr. Speaker, it becomes clearer every day that if one wants a government contract it all boils down to who you know in the PMO.

It is not just Liberal friendly ad firms that get rich at taxpayers expense. It is also Prime Minister friendly firms as well. A Liberal insider confirmed months ago that there were contracts issued to the PMO friendly firms with no competition. We now know that those contracts were worth over $71 million.

Why did the Prime Minister's friends at Earnscliffe and EKOS receive these contracts with little or no competition when they were actually just working on his behalf?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I believe what the hon. member is referring to is the area of public opinion research. It is important to recognize that the Auditor General has recognized that with the public opinion research the government has conducted itself appropriately. In fact, the government has strengthened management of both advertising and public opinion research. These changes create more competition and improve the value for the Canadian taxpayer that we receive from these suppliers for the department. We are strengthening our governance and ensuring the best possible value for all Canadian taxpayers.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, could the Minister of Public Works confirm that the RCMP attended the offices of Public Works sometime within recent weeks to take possession of numerous documents related to the sponsorship scandal which had not previously been disclosed to either the public accounts committee inquiry or the Gomery commission? Could the minister confirm that this is true?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, no, the minister cannot confirm that because this in fact has not occurred to the knowledge of the minister.

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, here is what a senior Liberal said in the media today about income trust unit holders. He said that Liberals do not believe there is a danger of a major backlash from angry investors because this group does not vote as a bloc. “They have no constituency. They don't count politically...”. Don`t you just love that Liberal arrogance, Mr. Speaker?

Why does the finance minister not just admit that the real reason he wants to gut the retirement nest eggs of seniors and investors is because they think they can get away with it?