House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

Gasoline Taxes
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jeff Watson Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, Liberals say they feel Canadians' pain at the pumps, yet plot to stick it to Canadians by pumping up the government's gas tax revenues instead. Conservatives are fighting to cut gas taxes to help seniors lower their coming heating costs now.

The environment minister tells them to “get on their bikes and ride”. Conservatives are fighting for gas tax relief for farmers who will not get their costs back. Environment Canada reports that Liberals really want them to pay $1.40 a litre.

Conservatives are fighting for small businesses that have to eat high gas taxes on the bottom line. The industry minister barks, “get used to it”.

Conservatives are fighting for Canadian families hurt by high gas taxes. The former natural resources minister lectures them, “squeeze into a wee bitty car”.

Conservatives are fighting to cut gas taxes for all Canadians. The Liberal member for Ajax—Pickering says Canadians should “look on the bright side”. The only thing colder for Liberals than the coming winter is the shoulder Canadians will give them at the polls.

Coquitlam's Flaunt Your Frenchness campaign
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Simard Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to extend my congratulations to the City of Coquitlam, which has won two Marketing Canada awards from the Economic Developers Association of Canada. Its “Fièrement francophone” or “Flaunt your Frenchness” campaign earned one award for tourism marketing and the other for promotional campaigns.

Last spring, with a view to celebrating the rich francophone heritage and culture of Coquitlam, its mayor encouraged his fellow citizens to show their francophone pride within the framework of a new tourism campaign created by Barb Stegemann, the city's director of tourism.

The purpose of the campaign was to focus on the dynamic nature of British Columbia's francophone community and its rich culture.

“Fièrement francophone” encourages people to flaunt their Frenchness, whether it be their language, their French ancestors, French fashions or a love for French cuisine.

Given our government's attachment to guaranteeing linguistic duality in Canada, I am very proud to have this opportunity to congratulate the City of Coquitlam in the House today.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I understand that David Dingwall, another Liberal appointee and head of the Mint, resigned today over the misuse of taxpayer dollars. However, this action takes place only after evidence of this waste and abuse was exposed by the opposition through access to information and reported by the media.

Can the Prime Minister tell us why this Liberal culture of waste and scandal is only stopped once it is actually exposed publicly?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Dingwall has dedicated most of his life to public service. He has been a member of Parliament. He has been a cabinet minister in the Government of Canada and he has been the head of the Mint. May I just simply say that under his tutelage at the Mint, the Mint has now been returned to profit.

The fact is that I have accepted his resignation, but let me just say that he gave the reasons for his resignation. Among them was that he does not want any distraction at the Mint while he replies to that kind of an allegation.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, on another matter, I was glad to hear that the Prime Minister did call the representatives of the families of the murdered RCMP officers yesterday to apologize.

I do want to return though to the substance of the question. The police families generally have been demanding mandatory minimum prison sentences. The Minister of Justice said after the tragedy in Mayerthorpe, “We have said before and I will repeat again that...mandatory minimums serve neither as a deterrent nor an effect.”

Will the Prime Minister take some action and impose mandatory prison sentences for serious, violent and repeat crimes?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we appreciate that there is no greater responsibility for a government than to protect the safety of its citizens, no greater responsibility than to protect the rights of communities and the rights of people in those communities.

Therefore, we have said and continue to enact, and it needs to be appreciated with regard to gun related crime that we take it with the seriousness that it deserves. There are at this point mandatory minimum penalties of up to four years to a maximum of life imprisonment for 10 serious offences committed with a firearm.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the minister says that mandatory minimum sentences do not work. I can give a reason why we need mandatory minimum sentences.

Paul Coffin, one of the Liberals involved in the sponsorship scandal, was in Montreal yesterday to give a lecture on ethics.

That is his sentence for defrauding the taxpayers of $1.5 million.

Does the Prime Minister find that acceptable?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the matter the Leader of the Opposition is referring to is currently before the courts. I cannot comment. I will repeat today that the case falls within the jurisdiction of the provincial Crown.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the families of the four murdered RCMP officers have called for mandatory prison sentences for marijuana grow ops. There were some members over there who actually believed that at one time. The families also want Bill C-17, the marijuana decriminalization bill, scrapped.

Family spokesman Reverend Schiemann said that the Roszkos of this world are laughing at us. He is worried that the Mayerthorpe tragedy could happen again.

The families say it is time to draw the line, but the government, instead of tightening the drug laws is actually slackening them. Decriminalization is a step in the wrong direction.

When will the Prime Minister commit to shelving Bill C-17 permanently and getting on with tightening our laws in the country?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the hon. member of two things.

Number one, that bill is a result of a unanimous recommendation by a parliamentary committee which included members of the opposition of that committee.

The second thing is that the bill calls for four new offences to combat grow ops with enhanced penalties. We would ask for the opposition's cooperation to enact that rather than to obstruct it.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, we thank the professor of justice for that little lecture, but he is wrong. The Liberal government's legacy will be leniency on drugs in Canada, soft on drugs and soft on crime generally.

Crystal meth labs are proliferating around the country. This highly available and addictive drug is having a devastating impact on the lives of Canadians. Just this week, a $2.5 million crystal meth lab was shut down, and B.C. municipal leaders are calling for more drug laws as well.

The Prime Minister knows Bill C-17 can actually increase drug use. When will the Prime Minister show some leadership for a change and introduce mandatory minimum sentences for—

Justice
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Justice.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, maybe the hon. member was not paying attention this summer. We moved to reschedule crystal meth. This now increases the penalty from 10 years to life imprisonment with regard to the production and distribution of crystal meth.

The opposition ought to look at what the law is rather than speak in ignorance of the law.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

September 28th, 2005 / 2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, after unremitting pressure from the Bloc Québécois, the federal government is finally showing more openness to creating a petroleum monitoring agency and giving the Competition Bureau more power.

With the cost of heating and groceries constantly going up because of the price of oil, will the Prime Minister promise, as the Bloc Québécois has proposed, to implement a refundable tax credit to help low-income families cope with this crisis right away?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the leader of the Bloc Québécois should know that the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs submitted to this House a clear study on this matter ages ago. The government is basing its decisions on that study.

We are now in the process of monitoring the prices. Yesterday you heard from the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Industry, who are currently working on other options. I want to commend the minister's parliamentary secretary, because he was the one who took the initiative, not the Bloc Québécois.