House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

Technology Partnerships Canada
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada has a contractual relationship with the companies that are in receipt of contributions under Technology Partnerships Canada. We have audited those programs and we have found breaches in those contracts. We are remedying those breaches and recoveries are being made to taxpayers.

Of the $2.8 billion in TPC funds that have been put out, we have got back $14 billion when we consider the amount that private sector companies have spent on innovation in Canada.

Technology Partnerships Canada
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

James Rajotte Edmonton—Leduc, AB

Mr. Speaker, $2.8 billion, 5% repayment, that is the truth about what the government has recovered. The fact about any proprietary information is that this is taxpayer money and taxpayers deserve an answer to these questions.

There is a discrepancy here between $350,000 and $460,000. Why does the government continue to hide how much money former Liberal cabinet minister David Dingwall received?

Technology Partnerships Canada
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I said before, the government's relationship, under the technology partnerships program, is defined in contracts with business. We are dealing with those contracts, we are remedying the situation and the Canadian economy is benefiting. It is nearly 90% small business that benefits from these programs.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, because of the rise in fuel prices, farmers have to pay more to heat their homes and greenhouses, dry their grain and run their machinery.

UPA president Laurent Pellerin is urging the federal government to help out farmers who were already having a hard time before fuel prices started to spiral upward.

Does the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food intend to pressure the Prime Minister to introduce some concrete measures to help the farmers cope with the rise in fuel costs?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly why we had business risk management programs in place so we could deal with things like increased input costs. In fact, the CAIS program is there to do that. To date that program has paid out to producers over $2.2 billion.

I point out that in the first six months of this year, our governments have paid to producers some $3.3 billion.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, I was referring to concrete measures to deal with rising fuel costs, and the answer I have just heard has no connection to that.

With gas at $1.05 a litre, it is estimated that additional costs to Quebec producers this year will be $52 million. Imagine what the situation will be when it is up to $1.40.

Will the minister come to the defence of farmers once and for all, and demand that his government compensate them for their additional expenses as a result of higher fuel prices?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member may have some difficulty understanding what an input cost is, but the reality is the CAIS program does deal with increased input costs, including those for energy.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the measures proposed by the Bloc Québécois can be implemented without being impossibly costly for the government. All that is needed is some courage and concern for the public interest.

Does the government not think that a surtax of $500 million on the astronomical profits of the oil and gas companies would be far more intelligent than repeating the $250 million in tax cuts they were given in 2003?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman's logic is a bit obscure. I am not sure that increasing taxes in this situation would lead to solutions to the problem.

To extend his logic, if there should be a sudden spike in the price of natural gas, would the hon. gentleman advocate some great new federal tax on Gaz Métropolitain or is it just Alberta and Saskatchewan companies that should be taxed?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Since the Minister of Finance's decisions keep on getting reversed, I would ask the real finance minister, in other words the Prime Minister, why he would miss the opportunity to put a surtax on oil and gas company profits in order to return that money to where it ought to have stayed all along, i.e. the taxpayers' pockets?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the gas companies are already among the largest taxpayers in the country. I would point out that on the latest figures that I recall when I was Minister of Natural Resources that the energy companies of this country to the federal government, to the provinces and to the municipalities were contributing over $15 billion in annual revenues to support public services like health care and education, and that was when the price was $35. Now they are contributing considerably more.

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

September 28th, 2005 / 2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Justice stated that the Criminal Code is full of examples of mandatory prison sentences, including murder and firearms. He also said that American defence lawyers say that mandatory prison sentences do not work. Big surprise there. The fox wanting to help the chickens out here.

Is the minister proposing to eliminate mandatory prison sentences for murder and firearms offences because he philosophically is opposed to those mandatory prison sentences?

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

No, Mr. Speaker.

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, the minister says that he is philosophically opposed to mandatory prison sentences and yet we have mandatory prison sentences. Those are in danger. Property crime rates in Vancouver and Winnipeg have now overtaken the worst American cities. In addition, thousands of serious violent offenders, including methamphetamine dealers, are getting house arrest, and the minister argues that mandatory prison sentences for murder and firearms offences do not work.

Is the minister proposing to eliminate them?

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am not certain what the hon. member does not understand about the word no.