House of Commons Hansard #79 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cmhc.

Topics

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, last night, as we all know, the NDP put forward a motion that contained a number of uncosted promises to Canadian veterans. This government will examine these as part of its lead-up to the next budget.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is not what the hon. member said in his letter to that particular constituent.

In April 2005, the Prime Minister said at the time, following a successful motion on Air-India, that the then prime minister had a moral responsibility to respect the will of the House and, days later, he said that it was disturbing from a democratic standpoint that the government would not listen to the will of the House.

This House adopted the NDP veterans first motion yesterday but the government refuses to act. Which is it going to be? Is the Prime Minister ducking his moral responsibility or would he prefer to characterize his own actions as disturbing?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the NDP put forward a motion that literally contains hundreds of millions of dollars in spending with no attempt to cost those out and no attempt to put them in a budget. Governments have a moral responsibility to ensure these proposals are affordable.

Canadian veterans see through that. Canadian veterans see through a bunch of empty promises. What Canadian veterans understand--

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The Prime Minister will want to conclude his answer.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Stephen Harper Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, an interesting reaction from a party that voted for five things it did not do in 13 years of office.

What Canadian veterans understand is that the way to support veterans is to first support them when they are in uniform and that is what this government is doing.

The Environment
Oral Questions

November 8th, 2006 / 2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Richmond Hill, ON

Mr. Speaker, one week late, the Minister of the Environment is headed to Nairobi, but she has yet to give the House any indication of what she will actually do when she gets there. We already know that the minister wants to gut the Kyoto accord but she has not told the House what changes she wants to make.

Will the Minister of the Environment admit that she will be pushing global warming off the international agenda until 2050 because she has no credible plan and no intent of addressing this international crisis?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the submissions we are making on behalf of the Government of Canada to the Nairobi conference are the submissions that have been on the United Nations website and our long-standing position on Kyoto since Germany, which was in May.

I welcome the member to take a look at those submissions. If he has any comments, I would like him to make them to me. I also invite him to speak to the member from his party who is accompanying us. We are being open and transparent about our position and we appreciate any feedback.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Richmond Hill, ON

Mr. Speaker, maybe the minister should step aside and let somebody else do the job, although it will be hard to find somebody over there who is committed to the environment.

In any event, this House has a right to know what changes the minister will make regarding Kyoto. This is an international accord that Canada signed but she has not lifted a finger to support Canada's commitments in 2012. Now she says that she wants fundamental changes to the accord.

What are the changes? Why is she pursuing them and why is she, contrary to the majority of members of the House and a majority of Canadians opposed to this do nothing plan, going ahead with nothing in her pocket?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I will tell the member exactly what change I have made.

We have moved the Canadian environment from voluntary measures, with no plan to reduce greenhouse gases or air pollution under the previous government, to regulations across every industry sector in the country. We started that process a few weeks ago and those regulations will obviously come into effect in the short term. We are setting short term targets, something this country has never had before. We are doing that in the new year.

Finally, this country will make progress toward our Kyoto obligations.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, clearly, this government does not know where it stands.

The Minister of the Environment promised a carbon credit trading market in Montreal but, within a week, was contradicted by the Minister of Industry and by the Prime Minister's press secretary. Now, the Prime Minister is contradicting his own press secretary and is also promising a carbon credit trading market in Montreal.

What is the government's response to the Montreal Exchange's fears that the carbon trading market will not see the light of day, due to these contradictions?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we are in consultation about the market, but our government believes that any such system must be based on market forces for the trading of credits with respect to greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

Unlike the Liberals, our government does not believe that it should use taxpayers' money to maintain a market. With our government, those who pollute must pay the price.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, if the Minister of the Environment plans to support the Montreal Exchange, does this mean she will set specific short-term targets for greenhouse gas reductions?

Luc Bertrand, president of the Montreal Exchange, believes that governments have a clear role to play in putting a value on carbon reductions. In other words, governments should take the Kyoto protocol's approach and not that of the oil and gas industry.

Will the minister deliver real targets, real reductions and a real policy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I invite the opposition to read sections 27, 29 and 33 of Canada's clean air act, which allow for a North American trading system. Like the acid rain agreement, what we need is a North American solution. We are therefore consulting industry and the provinces regarding short term targets.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Marcel Lussier Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment's dithering about creating a carbon exchange in Montreal prompted the president of the Montreal Exchange to say, and I quote:

What worries me the most is seeing this market trickle out of the country.

Yesterday, the Prime Minister confused 2011 with 2007, which did nothing to allay concerns. Four years' difference is no small thing.

My question is this: Does the Minister of the Environment agree that the Montreal Exchange has legitimate concerns about the contradictory statements she and—