House of Commons Hansard #79 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I met with the Montreal Exchange. We recognize the opportunity for Canada to lead the way in a carbon exchange market that is market driven based on industry and not through taxpayer dollars.

The mandate of the Government of Canada is to set out these regulations, and we will do so in consultation with industry and the provinces.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Marcel Lussier Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Montreal Exchange says it is ready to set up a carbon exchange.

Can the Minister of the Environment confirm that if a carbon exchange is established in Canada, it will not be in Winnipeg or Toronto, but in Montreal and nowhere else?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our government has always been clear that no market will use taxpayer money to buy or sell greenhouse gas credits.

Unlike the Liberals, who set up a $1 billion Canada emissions reductions agency to buy and sell domestic and international credits with taxpayer money, our government is not proceeding with this program. We will not subsidize the market and we will not create an artificial market. This market will be driven by industry and by the markets.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Montreal Exchange already has a head start with respect to establishing a carbon exchange. However, the government's hesitation and lack of clarity could very well nip this initiative in the bud.

By saying that there are still some loose ends, is the Minister of the Environment adopting a new strategy in order to move the future carbon exchange elsewhere in Canada?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I have made the point before that the member should look at the clean air act because it sets out, in three different sections, the opportunity for the government to recognize certain kinds of tradable units. That is actually the role that the Government of Canada plays. We recognize tradable units as part of the regulatory framework.

I would encourage the Bloc members, if they would like to see an exchange, to support the clean air act.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

The Montreal Exchange is not alone in asking for fixed targets so we do not miss the boat. Yesterday, the National Assembly unanimously passed a motion supporting the establishment of a carbon exchange in Montreal.

Is the Minister of the Environment planning to give a positive response to those who are telling her that setting greenhouse gas emission reduction targets is urgent so the carbon exchange can be established without delay?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is our role, as the government, to set up the regulations in order to have an opportunity for a carbon exchange. What I am waiting for is a yes from the Bloc. We need the clean air act to pass so we can recognize certain kinds of traceable units so we can have a flexible, efficient, modern market.

I would encourage her to have her environment critic actually read the clean air act, talk to me and then we can work on it together at the legislative committee.

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

November 8th, 2006 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister of evasion and non-answers failed to respond yesterday about 44 Conservatives who violated that party's empty accountable promise of last April 11 to limit contributions to $1,000.

Today, we learned of a 140 more. That is right; nearly 200 violations in total and now 200 broken promises.

Thousands of other violations will occur if the Conservative promise-breaking machine keeps smashing forward.

Will the minister confirm that these overcontributions will be returned and stopped? Will the Conservatives keep their promise of April 11, yes or no?

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, after a lot of thought and reflection, I want to thank the member for Ajax—Pickering for the idea. I do share his view that we need to get tougher. We need to make the federal accountability act and its campaign finance reforms retroactive to April 12.

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, yet another amendment from the Conservatives. That makes 52. Conservative senators just introduced number 51 yesterday.

Here are the choices. The Prime Minister and the minister can apologize, stop these violations and pay back the money. They can toss this promise in the garbage heap, along with all the other deceptions they made to get elected, and admit that the Conservatives' word means nothing. They can own up and admit that they pulled a fast one on Canadians. Or, are they going to say that Hansard did not catch their promise?

Will the minister keep the commitment he made to Canadians on April 11, yes, or no?

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the member for Ajax—Pickering says that we have choices.

I say that he has a choice. He can put up or he can shut up. He can announce that he will support our plan to make this bill retroactive. He can support our plan to make campaign finance reform retroactive.

Let us make the changes in the federal accountability act retroactive to April 12 and let us see the Liberal Party give back the 139 $5,000 donations, even from 12-year-olds, which should make the member for Eglinton—Lawrence happy.

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative income trust deception has now become an international embarrassment.

The Prime Minister promised that he would not monkey around with income trusts. Canadians and international investors actually believed him. They invested their life savings and put them away, only to get burned by this government's betrayal.

This government's deceit has hit the most vulnerable in Canada. It has impacted the international investment community.

After this falsehood and flip-flop, how can any investor ever trust the Conservative government?

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite correctly identifies the fact that a large number of unit holders in income trusts were foreigners and yes they were benefiting, and arguably benefiting unfairly from this tax loophole in Canada. I understand the party opposite voting against pensioners, but now it is advocating in favour of foreigners taking advantage of the Canadian tax system.

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, we are not advocating on this side of the House to turn the Canadian marketplace into a banana republic.

The Conservatives are an international embarrassment for Canada when it comes to the environment and now they have damaged Canada's economic reputation on the international level. The Prime Minister created this problem himself by promising Canadians he would not tax income trusts and as a result of this double-cross, this flip-flop and deceit, innocent vulnerable Canadians have lost their life savings.

Why did the Conservatives scam innocent Canadians throughout the country?