House of Commons Hansard #79 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cmhc.

Topics

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, this is a very confused opposition. It bungled this issue last year. It voted last night against helping out pensioners regarding income splitting in Canada and now it seems to be in favour of foreigners paying only a 15% withholding tax while Canadians bear the brunt of the Canadian tax burden.

That is the position it is taking, probably on the guidance I suppose of someone who spent a lot of time in foreign places paying foreign taxes, and that would be the member for Etobicoke—Lakeshore.

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

John Williams Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, according to Transparency International, the 2006 corruption index has Canada stalled at 14th place. Scandals like the Liberal sponsorship scandal only served to increase Canadians' perception of corruption among our country's leaders.

My question is for the President of the Treasury Board. Could he comment on why he believes the accountability act should be passed and not held up in the Senate?

Federal Accountability Act
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Edmonton—St. Albert who has been a real leader, both in Canada and around the world, on fighting corruption.

The Liberal sponsorship scandal was a very dark day in Canadian politics and for the Canadian government. It is the Conservative government that has brought in the federal accountability act, the toughest piece of anti-corruption legislation in Canadian history.

If we want to make movement on this list of shame, if we want to clean up our act, we have to pass the federal accountability act and the Liberal Party should take responsibility. The member for Etobicoke—Lakeshore should stand in this place and encourage the federal Liberal senators to drop their objection to this important piece of legislation.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am very disturbed by what I have seen of the government sales pitch to the people of Kashechewan. They are being advised to leave their territory because climate change will ravage their hunting grounds.

They are being encouraged to move to the francophone lumber town of Smooth Rock Falls. Why? Because they can pick blueberries. Why? Because there are 100 houses to pick up and they will “eventually be able to take over the community and its municipal infrastructure”.

My question is for the minister. If the government is going to float this promise to the people Kashechewan, why has it not given a heads up to the people of Smooth Rock Falls?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member and I have spoken about this matter often and the House is aware that, shortly after becoming the minister, I appointed Alan Pope, who is a respected Ontarian and former cabinet minister, as my special representative.

He has met with the community. I have met with the chief and members of the council. Mr. Pope has not yet reported to me. I expect that he will shortly. When he does, we will have a road forward and I will be pleased to bring it to the House as a lasting solution.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is what government representatives are telling people at the doors in Kashechewan and we have to be perfectly clear about what is being floated here. We are talking about the creation of disposable communities where we force one first nation off its traditional territory and push other people from their homes.

Is this the long term solution for dealing with the poverty of isolated first nations or is this a spoke in the wheel of the Kashechewan agreement? The Government of Canada signed an agreement with the people of Kashechewan. I am asking the minister what steps he will take to implement this agreement and ensure that it is implemented in a timely fashion?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, my friend goes too far. He knows full well that Mr. Pope has been well received in the community. He has had a fine working relationship with the new chief and council. He has consulted with the community leaders. He has worked long hours diligently hearing their point of view on what the alternatives are to move forward.

I would point out that this was done shortly after the government came to office. We intend to deal with the situation, unlike the former Liberal government that took months to even acknowledge that the problem existed.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

November 8th, 2006 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is outrageous to see that the Minister of Public Safety kicked the police chiefs off his firearms program advisory committee, but kept the collectors and vendors of semi-automatic weapons. This minister wants to silence the police because they keep saying, and rightfully so, that the firearms registry works well and that it is very helpful to them. Why is the minister doing this?

By the way, will the Prime Minister finally agree to meet with Hayder Kadhim?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I consult with many groups on the issue of firearms. I can also assure hon. members that I consult with police associations and people who have differing points of view and opinions. I also consult a firearms committee, whose members are experts on the technical aspects of firearms. I consult with nearly 500 other people and organizations.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, who could be more expert in technical affairs than the chiefs of police?

The Minister of Public Safety is going out of his way to silence the voices of police chiefs when it comes to his gun control plans. He has excluded them from his advisory committee and anyone else in favour of gun control, but has kept semi-automatic weapon owners and gun dealers. Members of his committee are paid for their expenses, yet the minister refuses to divulge their names, their mandate, or their meeting schedule. Why?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I usually take my colleague's comments with respect. I will not say she is deliberately misleading, but she is hopelessly misinformed. I meet with a variety of groups, including police associations and police representatives, who support what we are doing.

In Toronto so far this year there have been 236 victims of shootings, 25 of those people were shot to death. We want to go after criminals. We want to change the laws against those who use firearms in crimes and the Liberals will not support us in doing that.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government has just appointed Brian Lee Crowley to a position of influence as visiting economist in the Department of Finance. Mr. Crowley has claimed that Atlantic Canada has been victimized by pay equity programs. He has argued that EI, equalization, and agencies like ACOA impede growth. Now Mr. Crowley has the ear of the finance minister on economic policy for the entire country.

With the finance minister surrounding himself with right-wing ideologues, what programs can we expect to see on the government's chopping block?

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the appointment of the Clifford Clark Visiting Economist at the Department of Finance is made by the deputy minister of finance and not by the minister.

Dr. Crowley is an eminent Canadian. He is a Canadian public intellectual. He has experience across this country in working with various governments, including the governments of Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Manitoba and Alberta. He is extremely well educated.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is not Mr. Crowley's credentials that are at issue here, it is his hard right-wing ideology. He has called equalization “a welfare trap for the provinces”. The finance minister has appointed him at a time when equalization reform is in the spotlight all over this country. Now Mr. Crowley comes in, an ideologue who wants to get rid of the program in its entirety.

Does this appointment confirm that the government maintains that Atlantic Canadians should continue to wallow in a culture of defeat?

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, at first the member opposite suggested that it is not an appropriate appointment. He now suggests that I do not agree with the individual and therefore, the person ought not be appointed. It is still a free country.

We have intellectual activity in this country, thank goodness. We have eminent intellectuals in economics, like Dr. Crowley, who are prepared to express their views on various issues. Most important, Dr. Crowley is now prepared to take time from his life to dedicate to public issues in the Government of Canada and we thank him for his service.