House of Commons Hansard #12 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was agreement.

Topics

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, our government is clear. We are very interested in assisting aboriginal people in terms of education, housing, and of course children and families. We will be moving forward. We will see on Tuesday a budget with regard to our plans. Our choice in child care plans is something that will benefit all Canadians.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, members of the House know that the Kelowna accord is indeed an opportunity to make a difference. Canada's first nations would see improvements in health care, education, housing, and in economic opportunities. The funding for the Kelowna accord was booked in the same budgetary allocation that allowed the government to give $755 million to farmers, and that was good.

Given the budget that is being presented on Tuesday, will the minister confirm that $5.1 billion committed to the Kelowna accord will be delivered as promised?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, our government's agenda is based upon accountability and taking responsibility. It will also be that way with aboriginal policy. We are going to be working with aboriginal Canadians in the months ahead. I look forward to Tuesday when we outline some of our plans for the future.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, Kasechewan and water, Caledonia and land claims, Garden Hill and health care, all of these incidents of aboriginals being worse off than their fellow Canadians will be alleviated if the Kelowna accord is implemented in full. Canadians are demanding from coast to coast to coast that the prosperity gap be eliminated.

I challenge the minister. Will he make the Kelowna accord the government's sixth priority?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, our government is very interested in pursuing all of the issues that were left behind by the previous government.

We are going to take responsibility for the responsibilities that are laid at our feet. On Tuesday we will outline some of our budgetary measures and I am very hopeful that aboriginal people will see a good future in Canada.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday cash crop farmers from Mauricie dumped seven tonnes of corn at the regional office of Farm Credit Canada in Trois-Rivières. These farmers are at the end of their rope since their incomes have dropped by 80% over the past two years. Seeding time is about to begin and there is an urgent need to take action. For more than three years, the farmers of Quebec have been asking the Canadian government to help them contain the crisis.

My question is simple: does the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food intend to respond favourably to their request?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Richmond—Arthabaska for his question.

Our government already paid $755 million at the very beginning of its mandate to help Canadian and Quebec farmers. Of this amount, $39 million went to La Financière agricole du Québec.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

While grain producers in the U.S. get massive subsidies and report record profits, our farmers are waiting for the support promised by the Conservatives.

What is the minister waiting for to give financial help immediately for the spring seeding and to begin to reform the agriculture strategy framework?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, our government is very aware of the problems in agriculture in Canada and in the near future we intend to remodel the new agriculture income protection system.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Albina Guarnieri Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration said he was proud of Gwyn Morgan and his rogue views of Jamaican and Vietnamese immigrants. Mr. Morgan also believes that refugees abuse our society and refugees are “more likely to have violent tendencies”.

I ask the minister to guarantee that refugees fleeing persecution will not face prejudice from Mr. Morgan's appointments to the IRB and that Mr. Morgan will have no impact on IRB appointments. Will he at least do that much?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it really is unfortunate that the member opposite is quoting out of context remarks made years ago by Mr. Morgan, which he clarified shortly thereafter in a letter. Mr. Morgan has been voted by the entire Canadian business industry as the most respected Canadian business leader.

Of course, this government will continue to make Canada a safe haven for people who flee persecution abroad. We intend to do exactly that in the capable hands of our Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Daniel Petit Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the mining and production of serpentine asbestos, known as chrysotile, play an important part in Quebec's economy.

Could the Minister of Natural Resources tell this House about the safe use and production of this resource?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the government cares about worker and public health, and it realizes that certain asbestos fibres, such as those of the amphibole variety, present health hazards. However, the only asbestos fibre produced in Canada is chrysotile, which is safe under controlled conditions.

The Government of Canada recognizes the importance of the chrysotile industry to Quebec, and supports the safe use of chrysotile.

Public Service of Canada
Oral Questions

April 28th, 2006 / 11:55 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government has pledged to find $22 billion in savings in its upcoming budget. This has led many to speculate on where the cuts will occur.

Public servants in Ottawa have been left in the dark about whether they will be asked to shoulder the burden of these cuts like they were with the previous government.

Will the President of the Treasury Board give his assurances to our public servants that they will not lose their jobs to pay for Conservative promises?

Public Service of Canada
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I can indicate to the member opposite that the government will ensure that a respectful, productive relationship for public servants on both sides of the river is maintained. Morale has been quite low. We look forward to a productive relationship. I would encourage the member opposite to not believe any mischievous statements that might lead to some fearmongering.

The government wants a strong, vibrant public service to help deliver good programs to the people of Canada.