House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Afghanistan
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, Wednesday's rush debate on Canada's mission in Afghanistan highlighted once again the disdain and disrespect the Prime Minister has for the institution of Parliament. Even before the debate was concluded, he was announcing that he would only respect the results of that vote if we agreed with him.

Why would Canadians believe that their members of Parliament can protect their interests if the Prime Minister keeps implying that MPs do not count?

If we want our citizens to be fully engaged in the political process, we must create a culture that respects and encourages that engagement, and that culture is determined by the attitude from the very top. If the Prime Minister cannot demonstrate respect for this institution, why should Canadians?

I call upon the Prime Minister to apologize for his behaviour and to make a commitment that starting today he will work to create a culture of respect toward and within the institution of Parliament.

Holy Cross High School
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, it has been said, “Without music, life would be a mistake”, which is why I take great pleasure in welcoming Saskatoon's Holy Cross High School to the nation's capital as the students compete in the 34th annual MusicFest.

Holy Cross has grown from its modest beginnings in borrowed classrooms nearly half a century ago into one of the most well-respected educational institutions.

Continuing this tradition is a gifted group of 170 students which make up the two bands and a choir here today.

The grades 11 and 12 bands are under the direction of John McGettigan. The combined grades 11 and 12 choir is lead by directors Leanne Baldwin and Kristen Dorgen-Lee.

All of us in Saskatoon wish Holy Cross students great success this weekend and we thank Holy Cross for making us proud.

As the City of Saskatoon marks its 100th birthday next Friday, May 26, I ask all members to join with me in congratulating Saskatoon as it shines even brighter with these students on its 100th birthday.

Health
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this year, 153,000 Canadians will learn that they have cancer. While lifestyle changes can help to reduce some risks of cancer, we have a responsibility to eliminate the causes of cancer before they start.

Yesterday, I joined with Prevent Cancer Now, a coalition of environmental, health, labour and social justice advocates, to urge the government to commit to making primary cancer prevention a national health priority.

A significant portion of the $260 million committed to the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control must be dedicated to cancer prevention. In the words of Prevent Cancer Now:

We are no longer prepared to grant that cancer has become a recognized disease of childhood; that our women friends are expected to stoically sport scarves and turbans while awaiting an uncertain fate from breast cancer; that young men are increasingly diagnosed with testicular cancer; and that workers in many occupations are dying in order to make a living.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday in the House I asked the Minister of ACOA a question. His response to the question included a reference to me “going cap in hand, begging for ACOA projects in my riding”.

In a news article today he goes further by suggesting that I should not “bite the hand that feeds”, and that it will not help to get projects approved in my riding.

I have a number of responsibilities in this Parliament, like all MPs, being critic for ACOA among them. However, my number one job is to represent the people of Dartmouth—Cole Harbour and to advocate on their behalf, including organizations and businesses that interact with ACOA.

It is disgraceful to suggest that my constituents will get less attention because I am doing my job in Ottawa: asking appropriate questions of the minister.

In opposition, the member loved to dish out criticism but in government he reacts with anger and threats. That is not my style, nor will it be, but I will not allow my constituents to be victims of the minister's rants. He should apologize to the people of Dartmouth—Cole Harbour and retract his ill-advised comments.

Gaétan Lord
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, last month in my riding, Gaétan Lord won the jury prize at the Allostars Gala for his contribution as founding president of Canada's first centre for “allosexual” or queer youth, which offers support to gays, lesbians and young people who are unsure about their sexual orientation.

He began working to understand these young people, who often suffer and hide themselves, when his own son told him he was gay. He immediately accepted his son's sexual orientation and has supported him through every stage of his life.

Mr. Lord was aware of this problem in society, so he dedicated himself to this humanitarian cause and really put his heart into it, volunteering over 1,000 hours to get the house up and running in Terrebonne.

The members of the Bloc Québécois join me in congratulating Mr. Lord for the openness and acceptance he has shown homosexual youth.

Order of Merit of the Police Forces
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate an outstanding member of the Charlottetown Police Department.

Corporal Mike Quinn is one of the newest members of the Canadian Order of Merit of the Police Forces.

Corporal Quinn received his award this morning from Governor General Michaëlle Jean at a special ceremony at Rideau Hall.

The Order of Merit of the Police Forces honours a career of exceptional service and outstanding merit displayed by the men and women of the Canadian Police Services and recognizes their commitment to this country.

Corporal Quinn is a highly respected member of the City of Charlottetown Police Force and is well-known for his passion and his dedication to his community. He is the first municipal police officer in Prince Edward Island to have been successfully nominated to receive this very prestigious award.

On behalf of the residents of Charlottetown, I congratulate Corporal Quinn, his wife, Charlene, and family. It is a real honour for the community to have a member of the Charlottetown Police Department receive this recognition.

Afghanistan
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Jeff Watson Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not just Liberal members who backtracked on their commitment to our troops in Afghanistan. The member for Sackville—Eastern Shore originally said:

The answer is yes, I support the mission and the troops in Afghanistan and so does my party....

Then, in an odd twist of logic, he said that he would abstain from the vote because he supported our troops. Finally, he showed up and voted against our troops.

The member for Halifax said:

It's not a question of should we be in Afghanistan. Yes, we should, we need to be, we need to be in for the long haul.

She too voted against our troops.

The member for Laurier—Sainte-Marie said:

Well, I think supporting the troops... I do agree with that... we think we should have a debate... So we still like to have a vote, and we'll vote in favour.'

Yet the member turned around and voted against our troops.

I find it sad that opposition members would play politics with this mission.

Not long ago many opposition members pledged full support for our troops. On Wednesday they flip-flopped and chose to vote against the government instead. Our military men and women deserve better.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are shocked and appalled to hear reports today that indicate Iran is about to pass a law requiring non-Muslims to wear coloured badges identifying their religious beliefs. Jews would have to sew yellow strips of cloth on the front of their clothes, while Christians would wear red badges. This kind of state-run bigotry is both disgusting and frightening to Canadians and all citizens of the world who believe in tolerance and religious freedom.

What steps is the government taking to protest the actions of this rogue state?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is obviously deeply concerned about these reports. We have been unable at this point to independently verify the reports. Our officials are working diligently in Iran to establish independent verification of these deeply troubling reports.

We can say that should these reports turn out to be true, and we all hope they are not, this government will condemn in the strongest terms possible this kind of revisiting of the darkest period of the last century. If this turns out to be true, it is something that the entire civilized world must condemn.

Auditor General's Report
Oral Questions

May 19th, 2006 / 11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday at the legislative committee studying Bill C-2, government members grilled the Information Commissioner. The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice suggested the Information Commissioner had deliberately leaked his report in an effort to embarrass the Prime Minister. Talk about shooting the messenger, this is one more example of the government's pattern of absolute contempt for officers of Parliament.

As the government is so clearly concerned about leaks, can the Prime Minister inform the House as to the status of the internal investigation into the leak of the Auditor General's report by his office?

Auditor General's Report
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I would say the member asked a good question except for the suggestion that such a leak may have come from within the government. We have not been able to establish that. I can tell the hon. member that the Prime Minister takes this matter very seriously and has made very direct inquiries within the government to establish whether or not the apparent leak of the Auditor General's report with respect to the firearms registry originated from the government.

Yesterday members of the government expressed their concern as well, about the leak of a report of another officer of Parliament, the Information Commissioner, who did ultimately take responsibility for the leak of his report prematurely.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

That is one week and no results, Mr. Speaker.

During the last Parliament, the parliamentary secretary repeatedly called on the government to respect the will of the House and to act on resolutions passed by its members. He once famously said, “We live in a parliamentary democracy--not an elected dictatorship”.

Yesterday Prime Minister Howard committed Australia to meeting its Kyoto targets. Now that the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister is in government, does he intend to put his money where his mouth was? Will the government respect this week's vote of the House calling for Canada to meet its Kyoto obligations?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this member and this government always put our money where our mouth is. That is why we have delivered on our key election commitments. That is why in 100 days we have managed to achieve more of our election commitments than the Liberal government did in 13 years.

As it relates to Kyoto, the difference is that the Liberals talked for 13 years and did not deliver. What they did deliver was a 26% increase in greenhouse gas emissions over 1997 when they signed the accord. They missed their Kyoto targets by 35%. This government is not going to replay that record of failure. Instead, we are going to act with a concrete plan to reduce emissions and clean up Canadian air for our health.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the lack of respect the Conservatives have for Canadians and their Parliament is getting worse. An increasing number of people are speaking out against the abolition of the gun registry without a vote in this House: the Fédération des policiers et policières municipaux du Québec, the Fraternité des policiers et des policières de Montréal, the Association pour la Santé Publique du Québec, the Centre de prévention du suicide 02, and the Coalition for Gun Control.

Will the government listen to these agencies, which are saying that the registry saves lives?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this week the Auditor General proved that the gun registry was a colossal failure. We support effective control of guns, which is why we will keep the handgun registry, the permit system for gun owners, and training for owners and extend prison sentences for crimes committed with guns. Perhaps that is why the Liberal member for Outremont said, “The gun registry is a disaster, an outrageous scandal that cost $1.2 billion”. It was a Liberal member who said that.