House of Commons Hansard #18 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. The government is planning on making it easier, not harder, to take advantage of the system. Canadians paid millions of dollars to get to the bottom of Liberal corruption and now the unelected minister is running roughshod over the recommendations.

The minister's plan makes a mockery of the Conservatives' promises in the election campaign.

Will the government tell us why the Conservatives are now behaving like Liberals, saying one thing before an election and doing another thing afterwards?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, with respect, the preamble to the question is all over the place and just factually wrong. The government is going to do everything in its power to ensure taxpayer dollars are well spent and spent in the best interests of all Canadians.

Atlantic Accord
Oral Questions

May 8th, 2006 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance uses the Atlantic accord as an example of something that is wrong within the Canadian federation. Is he telling us that what is fair in Atlantic Canada is not fair for the rest of Canada?

My question is for the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, yes, my hon. colleague from Newfoundland and Labrador. Will he stand up for his province, take off the muzzle and tell the Minister of Finance that he is dead wrong, that the Atlantic accord is fair for Newfoundland and Labrador and it is fair for Nova Scotia?

Atlantic Accord
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Newfoundland & Labrador

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, what surprises me is the gall the hon. member has to stand up and ask a question like that. When we were fighting to get the benefits for our province from the Atlantic accord and when our Prime Minister forced the government to deliver, that member and others sat there and would not lift a finger to help Newfoundland and Labrador.

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Perth—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, funding for the arts was part of the government's budget. The money will go to groups who will engage our communities to learn and experience. Could the minister inform this House about the funding for the arts and the reaction from the arts community?

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to ensuring the integrity of the arts and cultural communities in Canada. The government's commitment to the arts, as demonstrated in the budget, has been well received. I would like to read for members what was said by the Chair of the Canada Council, Karen Kain:

I think this is a real vote of confidence in the Canada Council. To make it into the first budget of a Conservative government....This government has recognized the value and importance of the arts to the quality of the lives of Canadians and their communities; I think [it] is just wonderful.

I could not agree more.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, over the course of the past year, the media have revealed on many occasions that aircraft chartered by the CIA have flown over Canadian territory while transporting prisoners. Similar observations have been made elsewhere. The Council of Europe and the European Parliament have received a number of reports highly critical of these practices.

Will the Minister of Public Safety tell us whether he approves of the fact that the CIA is using Canadian airspace to transport prisoners?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member's concerns. I have asked the representatives of the public security agency about this. It appears that in all cases the pilots had submitted their flight plan, a list of the names and dates of birth of all passengers and the reason for the flight. Up to now, we have found nothing illegal.

Pensions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, in this budget, the Minister of Finance proposed to hide $3 billion of taxpayers' money in the Canada pension plan, a plan that is viable without that investment for at least another 70 years. Moreover, the budget was silent on enhancing public pension benefits for our seniors, who so desperately need financial security to retire with the dignity and respect they deserve.

Instead of hiding surplus money for questionable purposes in what should be a “pay as you go plan”, will the minister commit today to investing that money in a pension benefits guarantee fund to protect the thousands of workers and retirees whose pensions are put at risk by the 10,000 commercial bankruptcies a year?

Pensions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, those facts as stated are not accurate, but what is accurate is that for 30 years pensioners in Canada waited for an increase in their pension income credit, from $1,000 up. It took 30 years and this government to double that from $1,000 to $2,000.

Pensions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

That concludes question period for today. I believe the Minister of National Defence is rising on a point of order.

National Defence
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would like to clarify the remarks I made in question period on Thursday, May 4. My remarks were in response to a question about Norad's information sharing. The maritime aspect of the agreement will give Norad access to data that has been shared between security and defence agencies in North America for several decades. This applies to all Canadian and U.S. waters, including internal waters. Therefore, Canadian internal waters in the Arctic archipelago would also be covered by this agreement.

This is nothing new. We already share this type of information with the U.S. The Norad agreement will allow us to better manage this activity. In no way will this provision weaken our sovereignty. Any decision about action in Canadian internal waters will remain Canada's alone.

Emergency Management Act
Routine Proceedings

3 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-12, an Act to provide for emergency management and to amend and repeal certain Acts.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-263, An act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (elimination of waiting period).

Mr. Speaker, first I wish to thank my colleague from Beauséjour for supporting this bill.

Today, I am proud and honoured to introduce this bill, which will help improve the lives of seasonal workers. The purpose of the bill is to eliminate the two-week waiting period that precedes payment of employment insurance benefits. After taking into account the best weeks in previous years, these changes to the Employment Insurance Act will enable seasonal workers to receive employment benefits more quickly.

For several months, I have been working hard in order to introduce this bill in the House of Commons so that the employment insurance system can best meet the needs of seasonal workers.

We are at the first reading stage and I hope that the government will support workers by passing this bill. This program is of vital importance in my riding.

I am therefore very proud of my efforts on behalf of the citizens of Madawaska—Restigouche.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Education Benefits Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Etobicoke Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-264, an Act respecting education benefits for spouses and children of certain deceased federal enforcement officers.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to introduce a private member's bill entitled an act respecting educational benefits for spouses and children of certain deceased law enforcement officers. This initiative was originally the vision of a former member of the House, Janko Peric, of Cambridge, Ontario. Mr. Peric introduced a similar bill during his tenure. I hope we will see him back in the House to continue his fight for public safety initiatives.

The bill would provide for educational benefits of a financial nature to the surviving spouse and children of federal enforcement officers who die from injuries received or illnesses contracted in the discharge of their duties. The bill mirrors legislation that currently exists in the province of Ontario.

In light of last year's tragic deaths of four RCMP officers in Mayerthorpe, Alberta, I would hope that colleagues from all sides of the House will lend their support to this worthy initiative. We owe it to the families of those who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving and protecting us.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)