House of Commons Hansard #19 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister clarified yesterday who was speaking on behalf of the government and who was not. What the member of the official opposition has not done is explain the actions and the comments of the member for Scarborough—Guildwood or the member from Mississauga East. Why have they not stood in this place and offered a full apology, and can people with these views continue to sit as a member of his party's shadow cabinet?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, the point that the minister misses is very simple. There is a difference between expressing an opinion about the judiciary and launching a personal attack on the independence of Canada's chief justice and to put words in her mouth. There is a huge difference.

Canadians want to know are the comments from the member for Halton and the Prime Minister's close association with the ultra right wing Civitas Society part of their real agenda, an agenda to destroy the independence of our judiciary?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I cannot resist answering a question about the vast right wing conspiracy. What I will say is that I will speak to the Minister of National Defence and see if there is any possibility in the budget of a black helicopter, so we can fly the hon. member around to investigate his concerns.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the chair of the aboriginal affairs committee with regard to the agenda of the committee.

Despite a history of disparaging remarks, the hon. member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin remains the Prime Minister's anointed chair of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

With a motion of non-confidence now before the committee, it is clear that he no longer has the confidence of this chamber. Therefore, I would ask the committee chair this. Will the first item on the agenda at the next meeting be his unequivocal apology and a tendering of his resignation as chair of the committee?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member is a member of that committee, why does he not raise these issues at the committee himself. He knows committee chairs and vice-chairs serve at the pleasure of the committee. The committee will decide what it wants to do. That is what should happen. He should not be bringing the matter up here.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, the member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin insists that Canada's judicial system is race-based and too lenient on aboriginal peoples. These prejudicial comments are unbecoming to the position, which the Prime Minister has bestowed on him. This is another stain on the shirt of the uncaring Conservative government.

Aboriginal Canadians and committee members have lost all confidence in the chair. Canadians deserve better. Again, will the hon. member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin stand here now and declare that the first matter of business on tomorrow's committee agenda will be to submit an unequivocal apology and tender his resignation as chair?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, we have heard from aboriginal Canadians that they have full confidence in the ability of the government to deal with aboriginal issues.

The budget, which has been put forward, is a wonderful budget with more for aboriginal Canadians than ever emerged from that side of the House, in terms of northern housing, off reserve housing, increases in additional funds for women, children and for other purposes.

Aboriginal Canadians will have confidence in this government.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, a major coalition of international environmental groups may not want the Minister of the Environment to chair the Climate Change Conference to be held in Bonn next week.

Does the Prime Minister agree that his anti-Kyoto protocol stance is not fooling anyone and that the Government of Canada has already been so completely discredited internationally that the Minister of the Environment is in danger of being asked to step down from chairing the Bonn conference?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I continue to engage international counterparts on the issue of climate change. In fact, I am very proud that our government has taken the position we have in our approach to international talks on climate change. We are taking an inclusive approach.

It is important for Canadians to understand that 73% of countries in the world are the large emitters and 73% of emissions are not caused by countries that are in the protocol. We have to talk to countries that are within the United Nations framework and countries outside the framework. That is the direction the government is taking.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment can make all the statements she wants, but should she not admit that she has no more credibility in this House than she has internationally, not with environmental groups and certainly not with other countries and the international community?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is important for all Canadians and all members of the House to understand that we are not the only country within the Kyoto protocol facing challenges. A number of international counterparts within the protocol agree with us that countries like China and India have to take on commitments to reduce their pollution and greenhouse gases. We need to engage countries outside of the protocol, like Australia and the U.S., to also make commitments. That is the approach we are going to take.

Health
Oral Questions

May 9th, 2006 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, even though silicone breast implants have been banned, barring exceptional circumstances, in Canada since 1992, some 24,000 cases have nonetheless been approved by Health Canada and only 45 cases have been denied.

Do these figures, which make us shudder, not show that we have a revolting and scandalous situation whereby Health Canada puts women's health far behind the financial interests of certain groups?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, it is important for this situation to be more regulated. The regulatory requirements are now clear.

I want to add that in the current context a doctor has to make the request. I believe this situation is clearer and promotes women's health.

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, will the Minister of Health admit that the power of the lobbyists in this controversial breast implant issue and the fact that Mentor, the company calling for silicone implants to be reintroduced, was the subject of a criminal investigation in the United States in 2002 do not trouble him enough to uphold the ban and order an investigation to determine why the exception has become the rule at Health Canada with respect to breast implants?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, it is important for the situation to be regulated. That is now the case. It is important for Health Canada to protect women at all times.

I want to add in this House that a regulated situation exists and that we can defend women in this situation.