House of Commons Hansard #46 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was international.

Topics

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present today, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.

The committee has studied the Canadian Wheat Board and has agreed to report it.

International Trade
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on International Trade, on the softwood lumber agreement between Canada and the United States.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Conservative

Andrew Scheer Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-343, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (motor vehicle theft).

Mr. Speaker, it is a great honour for me to rise today. This is the first private member's bill I have introduced in my career as a member of Parliament.

The bill is in response to a growing concern in Regina and throughout my riding of Regina—Qu'Appelle with the alarming rate of car theft. Regina at various times has been the car theft capital of Canada. We have experienced various rashes of criminal gangs stealing cars for either joyriding or to strip them down and sell them. Unfortunately, our legal system does not have a lot of deterrents for those criminals.

The bill would establish a three strike system. On the person's third conviction or any subsequent conviction thereafter, the case will be prosecuted by indictment and there will be minimum prison sentences. What it means is that no longer will criminals be able to steal several cars and not ever face any prison time. The bill establishes a clear signal that on the third offence the person will go to jail.

I appreciate the support of my colleagues on this bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

10:30 a.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-344, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (Employment Insurance Account and premium rate setting) and another Act in consequence.

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me to introduce my first bill. This bill addresses an issue that affects many people in the riding of Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine. It also affects everyone grappling with the horrible problem of an employment insurance fund that over time, over a number of years, accumulated some $50 billion. The unemployed of yesterday and today are victims of this situation.

This can also be a message of hope for some workers who are in very difficult situations. I am referring to the people in the riding of Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine in particular who are working in the crab or shrimp industry, for example, at E. Gagnon et Fils in Gascon and at Marinar in Rivière-au-Renard.

If the bill passes, it will correct an injustice and allow employment insurance to be managed more appropriately.

The Conservative Party already voted in favour of the bill at second reading during the last Parliament. I think we can count on their support again today. If they are consistent with their previous decision, we could easily pass this bill to correct an injustice and help the unemployed.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
Routine Proceedings

June 22nd, 2006 / 10:30 a.m.

Liberal

Navdeep Bains Mississauga—Brampton South, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-345, An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (appointment of special counsel).

Mr. Speaker, last week the Supreme Court of Canada held hearings challenging the constitutionality of security certificates. It is well-documented that the present process in place for issuing security certificates and detaining individuals without the right to see the evidence against them denies an individual due process. The process needs to be consistent with charter principles, and I believe that we can accomplish that and restore public faith in our system.

My bill would make it mandatory for a special counsel to be appointed in order to scrutinize the evidence and the methods used to gather that evidence against an individual detained on a certificate. The purpose of the special counsel would be to ensure all constitutional and charter rights of the detained individual are respected. The bill makes the special counsel a representative of the public interest rather than the individual in order to avoid a conflict of interest that could arise from solicitor-client privilege.

There are extreme views on both sides of this very sensitive issue. There are those who want to see national security trump all individual rights, while there are those who would like to see the security certificate process abolished completely. I believe the government needs to find a more balanced approach. It needs to balance national security concerns with individual rights, and I believe this bill would accomplish that.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
Routine Proceedings

10:35 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would remind hon. members that on the introduction of private member's bills, it is a brief summary of the bill. We are getting into longer summaries it seems to me this morning.

State Immunity Act
Routine Proceedings

10:35 a.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-346, An Act to amend the State Immunity Act and the Criminal Code (terrorist activity).

Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of all Canadians to introduce a bill entitled, an act to amend the State Immunity Act and the Criminal Code, terrorist activity.

The bill would amend the State Immunity Act to prevent foreign states that engage in terrorist activity from claiming immunity from the jurisdiction of Canadian courts. It also amends the Criminal Code to provide victims who suffer loss or damages as a result of terrorist activity with a civil remedy against the person or state who engaged in the terrorist activity.

The legislation is far superior and more comprehensive than anything ever tabled in this House. Terrorism is not a victimless crime and the victims and their families must be ensured that their rights are protected.

I thank the member for Cambridge for seconding my bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:35 a.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-347, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (keeping child pornography in a manner that is not reasonably secure from access by others).

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise today on behalf of the residents of Fleetwood—Port Kells to introduce a bill entitled “An Act to amend the Criminal Code (keeping child pornography in a manner that is not reasonably secure from access by others)”.

There is no doubt that our children are our most precious resource. As parliamentarians, our commitment to Canada's future must begin by protecting the innocence of our children and bringing violators of that innocence to justice.

The bill would amend the Criminal Code to make it an offence for anyone to possess child pornography regardless of how it is obtained. It will also ensure that anyone gaining access to the material or failing to prevent others from accessing the material will be liable under the Criminal Code.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Conscientious Objection Act
Routine Proceedings

10:35 a.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay Burnaby—Douglas, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-348, An Act respecting conscientious objection to the use of taxes for military purposes.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to again introduce a private member's bill which would allow Canadians who object on conscientious or religious grounds to paying taxes for military purposes to have a prescribed percentage of their income tax diverted into a special conscientious objector account.

The bill would recognize the deeply held views often related to deeply held religious convictions of some Canadians that participating in any way in the activities of war and the accumulation of weapons sanctions and perpetuates killing and violence. The bill would provide an important option for conscientious objection and ensure that the tax dollars of those Canadians who hold these beliefs are spent for peaceful purposes.

A particular feature of the bill is that the regulation should be developed in consultation with organizations including the Canadian Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, the Quakers; the Conference of Mennonites in Canada; Conscience Canada; Mennonite Central Committee Canada; and Nos impôts pour la paix.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Patent Act
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-349, An Act to amend the Patent Act.

Mr. Speaker, this is the second time I have introduced this legislation into the House of Commons.

It deals with patent protection and also the issue of evergreening where legal loopholes extend the patent protection of certain drugs that then cost Canadians significant sums of money, not only to individuals but also in employment benefit plans as well as the organizations that actually provide that across the country.

This will lower drug costs, provide fairness, and make us more similar to the United States. The Americans actually have a more progressive generic drug industry because they have enacted legislation to stop the legal litigation. Most important, it will promote innovation.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canadian Heritage
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Perth—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage presented to the House earlier this day be concurred in without debate.

(Motion agreed to)

Finance
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I rise today with several motions all dealing with committee travel.

There have been discussions among the parties and if you were to seek it, I believe you would find unanimous consent to the following motion. I move:

That, during its consideration of matters pursuant to Standing Order 83.1, the Standing Committee on Finance be authorized to adjourn from place to place within Canada and to permit the broadcasting of its proceedings thereon, and that the necessary staff do accompany the committee.

(Motion agreed to)

Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among all the parties and if you were to seek it, I believe you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:

That, in relation to its study on employability in Canada, six members of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities be authorized to travel in October and November 2006 to the following locations: first, to St. John's, Halifax, Montreal, and Toronto; and second, to Vancouver, Calgary and Saskatoon; and that the necessary staff do accompany the committee.

(Motion agreed to)

Public Accounts
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among all the parties and if you were to seek it, I believe you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:

That, in order to attend the conference of the Canadian Association of Public Accounts Committees, 10 members of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts be authorized to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island from September 10 to 12, 2006, and that the necessary staff do accompany that committee.

(Motion agreed to)

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:40 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among all the parties and if you were to seek it, I believe you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move that notwithstanding the order made on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security be authorized to continue its deliberations relating to the review of the Anti-Terrorism Act beyond June 23, 2006 and to present its final report no later than December 22, 2006.