House of Commons Hansard #23 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Income Tax
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, recently the Liberal leader had the audacity to claim that our government had not taken action to tackle poverty. That is quite the statement from a leader whose own MPs, like the member for York Centre, openly admit that the Liberals have not done well in the past in combatting poverty. It is also astonishing coming from someone who is against our working income tax benefit.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance please explain the importance of this measure?

Income Tax
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Burlington for his work on this file.

Unlike the Liberals, we are not simply talking about tackling poverty. We are doing it through measures like the working income tax benefit. This measure will supplement earnings of low income Canadians to encourage them to work, instead of remaining on social assistance. We hope to build on this key first step.

The Liberals should stop opposing this measure and vote for Bill C-28.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, disingenuously the Prime Minister is attempting to convince Canadians that the SPP is about nothing more harmful than jelly beans. Unfortunately, his government's own internal documents, when they are not totally censored, tell a different story about a wide and dense agenda.

The SPP involves the giveaway of Canada's energy and water resources and the dumbing down, the worst thing, on lowering of regulatory standards in over 300 areas, including transportation safety, food safety, consumer and environmental standards. So much for jelly beans.

Will the Prime Minister respect Canadians and come clean on his dirty SPP agenda?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, in a competitive global economy, Canada benefits from strong relationships with our North American neighbours. Under the SPP, we are working to ensure Canadian firms continue to have access to U.S. suppliers and American markets. We are working with our neighbours on smart border initiatives, infrastructure improvements and regulatory cooperation.

It is something on which the NDP should be supporting us instead of going against the government.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, we are smarter than that.

This government is working behind the scenes on a free trade agreement with Colombia, a country that violates the Canadian values of justice and human rights. Since the arrival of the new president, 560 Colombian citizens have been assassinated for the crime of unionizing. The army has carried out over a thousand summary executions of journalists and peasants.

The U.S. Congress refuses to support a similar agreement because of these abuses. Will the government stop talking business with a Colombian government whose hands are stained with blood?

International Trade
Oral Questions

November 23rd, 2007 / 11:45 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Brian Pallister Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the key is the government understands we do not separate trade opportunities from human rights benefits. Human rights benefits can accrue to the people of other nations if we give them the opportunity to enter into trading relationships.

In fact, as opposed to the ideological protectionism that the member and his party demonstrate all too often, we understand that opening doors to trading opportunities around the world is a way to advance human rights successfully, and we will continue to do that.

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, since the Conservatives came to power, 65,000 manufacturing jobs have been lost in Quebec. The forestry sector has lost 10,000 jobs since April 2005. These sectors are in crisis and the Prime Minister still has not met with the provincial premiers to talk about it.

What is the Prime Minister waiting for to wake up and send out invitations to the provincial premiers?

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, the Economic Development Agency of Canada is helping with the diversification of the forestry communities, among other things, through its new CEDI-Vitality measure. Between February 7, 2006, and September 30, 2007, the agency provided assistance to 680 projects, creating 5,663 jobs in the manufacturing and forestry sectors of Quebec, which now employ over 11,000.

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec read the wrong briefing note.

When will the Prime Minister invite the provincial premiers, as the Premier of Quebec has been asking him to do, to a public meeting under the media spotlight in order to discuss serious matters to do with Canada's economy?

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, today the Government of Quebec announced assistance for the manufacturing and forestry sectors and we are happy about that.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday morning we learned of another tragic taser death. This is the second death in just one short month.

The British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Quebec governments are all conducting reviews. A review of RCMP taser use protocol is not enough.

When will the government call a national review on the use of tasers that includes all law enforcement bodies?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as I have already indicated, there are a number of ongoing reviews on this matter. I think the member, if he listened to my last answer, would understand that the minister has asked Mr. Paul Kennedy to bring back a report by December 12 on the use of the taser by the RCMP.

The hon. member has to also respect the jurisdictional issues that apply across the country.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, the answer is not satisfactory. Two people have died and another one is in critical condition after being jolted by a taser. At least 19 people have died by taser since 2003.

Canadians are outraged. They want answers now. When will the government act responsibly and initiate a full national review and will the minister make all the reports public?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

As I said, Mr. Speaker, there are a number of ongoing investigations, including a number of provincial investigations. The minister has asked Mr. Paul Kennedy to bring back a report, which he will have on or before December 12. I think it is important we wait for that.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the inaction on the part of the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration is responsible for the backlog at the IRB. When this government first came to power, the board had reduced the average processing time for refuge claims to 9.4 months. This year, there is a backlog of more than 12,000 files and the average processing time has jumped to 14.3 months. There are currently 43 vacant commissioner positions, which represents 34% of the total work force.

Is the minister aware that not enough of these positions are being filled and that the backlog will continue to grow?