House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was identification.

Topics

Hog Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Secretary of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. With the CAIS program, producers have enjoyed historically high margins. Currently they are in need of immediate assistance. The federal government is working, and is openly saying so, on improving risk management in order to help our producers. Furthermore, by the end of 2006, some $4.5 billion had been paid to the producers. We never saw anything like that under the Liberal government, so they can stop lecturing us.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative ministers from Quebec have nothing to be proud of today. Signing the contract with Boeing is a pathetic display of just how little influence they have with this government. They are just a small part in a big machine that is weakening Quebec's aerospace industry. For people who claim to be defending Quebec, this spectacle is not only disappointing, it is appalling.

Did the Minister of Industry calculate how many jobs he sacrificed in Quebec in order to keep his limousine?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I am surprised that the member has such little confidence in the Quebec aerospace industry.

Our plan is clear, transparent and fair. All Canadian companies will have the opportunity to work with this. The real people who are letting down Quebec, remember, is the Bloc Québécois because under the Bloc, Quebec has received zero jobs and zero benefits for the aerospace industry.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, everything old is new again. When we are talking about Ontario's automobile industry, concentration is seen as a positive thing, but when it comes to concentrating the aerospace industry in Quebec, oddly enough, the same reasoning no longer applies.

Will the Conservative ministers from Quebec tell us why that is?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I can only repeat that under the IRB policy it is the responsibility of the Minister of Industry to ensure that investments made here in Canada are of the highest possible quality. This is exactly what we are doing to resupply our long neglected military.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

February 2nd, 2007 / 11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, Standard & Poor's rating agency identified, not once, not twice but eleven times, the federal government as directly responsible for the reduced credit rating of the Wheat Board.

The Prime Minister and his ministers stand accused of wilfully harming the economic viability of the board, not its directors, nor farmers, but the government.

Does the minister deny this statement of facts by Standard & Poor's, “Standard & Poor's expects that government support of CWB will continue to deteriorate as long as this government lasts”?

Does the minister deny that statement?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, it comes as no surprise that the Wheat Board is being affected, because the Liberals, the NDP and radicals on the board for the last year have said that it is going to fail.

The government and the minister have made it clear that the Wheat Board is not going down the tube. It will be one of the options available.

I wonder why the member for Malpeque does not ask questions that really matter to farmers, such as why the main grain buyer for the Algerian government would be saying, “The Canadian Wheat Board's selling price in Algeria is very low, since our country benefits from preferential prices. This preferential price saves Algeria several tens of dollars per tonne purchased. No other country offers us such benefits”.

Why does he not ask about that?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, the opposition parties continue their campaign of fearmongering among Canadian women. The misinformation and outrageous accusations are unfounded.

If we were to listen to the rhetoric of the opposition, there would be no money for women under a Conservative government. It is time to set the record straight.

Could the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women tell the House if there have been any applications under the modernized and renewed status of women program?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, we have received 56 applications and more to come as organizations, which were previously shut out, now develop projects that will really help women in their communities.

The first approved application under the new terms and conditions is for the Prince George New Hope Society. Their project is to facilitate the exit of young women, particularly young aboriginal women, in Prince George and northern B.C. from the sex trade.

This project will provide support for social services and make a safer and healthier transition for their exit--

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Sackville—Eastern Shore.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, in 1997 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the fisheries of Canada is a “common property resource” and must be managed in the interests of all Canadians.

The Government of Canada has just released Bill C-45, one of the most sweeping changes to the Fisheries Act we have ever had in this country. It privatizes the fishery, corporatizes the fishery, destroys fish habitat and allows DFO officials to be off the hook for their decisions.

In 1992 the cod collapse cost the Canadian taxpayer $4 billion and nobody was held accountable.

Will the minister now bring in a new act that reflects the real wishes of fishermen in this country?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Newfoundland & Labrador

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, those were very interesting comments from the member. Last year, when the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans had the choice of whether to deal with the Fisheries Act or take up the main problem that it should be dealing with, the northern cod in Newfoundland and Labrador, that member voted to deal with the Fisheries Act because it was so important to bring in a revised Fisheries Act.

We brought in a revised act, one that his provincial government supports, one that the Atlantic provinces support and one that fishing groups support. Everybody supports it except him.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, there is a saying in Atlantic Canada, “when you are walking on thin ice, you might as well dance”, and that minister is doing one hell of a jig.

The fact is that his own parliamentary secretary said this was a management tool of ITQs. Senator Comeau, a Conservative, said in his report that ITQs favour the corporate sector.

This revised act would turn a public resource into the hands of management of the corporate sector of this country, thus destroying the hopes and dreams of thousands of fishermen, their families and communities right across the country.

Why is the minister doing this?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Newfoundland & Labrador

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, it would be extremely difficult to dance to music like that. The member is completely and utterly out of tune, as he usually is.

Let me say to the hon. member that the fish is a public resource. It is owned by the people of Canada and managed by us. It will not be turned over to the private sector.

The revised act would ensure that individuals who are licensed to fish that resource will fish it for the benefit of the people of Canada.

National Defence
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are choosing to mothball our navy's refuelling and supply ships two years before the new ships are supposed to come online, apparently to save money. This will leave our navy without a refuelling capability for two solid years, severely restricting their capabilities. That is the government that inherited the best fiscal situation of any government in history and it has chosen to shaft our navy.

Will the Minister of National Defence reverse this foolish decision and enable our current supply ships to remain functional until the new ones come online?