House of Commons Hansard #117 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was fisheries.

Topics

Security Certificates
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, today, the Supreme Court handed down a unanimous decision on the use of security certificates. The court ruled that they are illegal because they violate the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Will the government assume its responsibilities? Will it allow this House to quickly abolish security certificates? Will we finally respect human rights here in Canada?

Security Certificates
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as I have already indicated, we thank the Supreme Court for its decision on security certificates. We have just received that decision, which is very lengthy. We are reviewing it carefully.

The government intends to respond in a timely and decisive fashion to address the court's decision.

Security Certificates
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, we are really beyond platitudes with regard to the two men who are still being retained in the Kingston prison system. They have been on a hunger strike for more than 70 days.

After the Supreme Court decision today, striking down the certificate under which they are being held, will the government commit to negotiate seriously with its counsel to get them out on the same condition that the other four people detained under certificates have been previously released?

Security Certificates
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, we will respond in a timely and decisive fashion to the court. I think it is important that the member stay tuned.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canadians woke up today to sky high gas prices and fuel shortages. The previous Liberal government established a petroleum price monitoring agency to help Canadians better understand gas prices at the pump and to enhance transparency. People want to understand what is going on in the industry.

It is no surprise that the Conservative government, which has been anything but transparent, slashed the budget of the agency. In this time of high gas prices, what is the Conservative government doing to help Canadians with this problem?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we are working together with the provinces and the oil industry in order to closely monitor the progress of the situation. We are also concerned about CN's ability to provide essential services, such as supplying food and fuel to remote areas.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, I hope it makes sense to the Conservatives. It certainly did not make sense to me.

The price of fuel is going up and up. In the past year and a half, Canadians have seen gas prices bounce back and forth, at times reaching $2 a litre in places like Labrador, my riding.

The government has billions and billions in surpluses. It is awash in cash. It is up to its eyes in money. What is the government doing to help people deal with the gas crisis?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the price of oil and gas depends on their value on global markets and other factors, such as the number of competitors, the size of the market, the cost of transportation and local market conditions. Limited surplus refinery capacity can also influence pricing.

We are aware of the problem and we are taking care of it. The Liberals never did anything.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I was shocked to hear the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development say that EI was a rich program for employees. This program helps thousands of seasonal workers in Atlantic Canada and throughout the country. These workers have families to feed and bills to pay, however, they have to wait up to eight weeks before they receive their first cheque.

How can the minister justify leaving thousands of families without any income for so long?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, we are concerned about the people who are not working. We want EI to be there for the people who need it. I am not sure what the member is talking about because I have been informed that there is not an eight week waiting period.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government has done absolutely nothing to help Atlantic Canada's economy. The government abandoned the industries and workers when the plants closed. The minister and the government remain clueless about the reality of people who have to apply for employment insurance in order to feed their families. We are not talking about living; we are talking about surviving.

How can the minister have the audacity to say that the EI program is a rich program for employees? How can he say that?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, I do not know who he is because the member never said. I do not know if the minister said that. However, I want the member to know that changes to the EI program take into account impact it would have on employees, employers or beneficiaries.

I do not understand what he is talking about, when he said the minister said that.

Montreal Planetarium
Oral Questions

February 23rd, 2007 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, nine months ago, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services promised the mayor of Montreal $9 million for the relocation and construction of the new Montreal planetarium at the Biodome. The Government of Quebec and the City of Montreal have already invested that amount. All that is missing is Ottawa's contribution.

Why is the federal government taking so long to make its financial contribution when it committed to it in writing nine months ago?

Montreal Planetarium
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, we are aware of the situation. We respect the concerns expressed by the Bloc Québécois and by Quebeckers in the region. If any announcement is to be made, it will be made soon.

Montreal Planetarium
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, the City of Montreal has calculated that this project will result in approximately $33 million in economic spinoffs for Montreal's east end. By failing to keep its promise, the government is jeopardizing the relocation of the Montreal planetarium.

What is the Minister of Public Works and Government Services waiting for to announce the federal government's participation as soon as possible?