House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was employment.

Topics

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, while this public consultations process is completely independent and run by an independent contractor, what occurred here is clearly an unacceptable situation.

I have been told by my officials that the subcontractor has been terminated, the situation has been corrected and the polling firm that is the main contractor has assured us that it will not affect the results of the report that it will be presenting to the government this summer.

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Catherine Bell Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister is using delay and stall tactics to put the brakes on any kind of voting reform in this country.

The system is broken and the minister does not want to hear from Canadians who have better ideas. In fact, he went so far as to appoint a firm that not only despises reform but advocates against changing our voting system. This is hardly fair or balanced. This is disgusting political trickery and manipulation of the highest order.

If this is to be a fair process, why hide it from Canadians? Will the minister now table the contracts in this House?

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, this was a very independent process. I suppose the NDP would only like to see a process where the contractor is one who shares its particular vision of an outcome to be predetermined.

We do not want an outcome predetermined. We want to genuinely hear from Canadians, not those who have a lobby group that has made its views already clearly known, but from ordinary Canadians on the things that matter to them: House of Commons, Senate reform, the way our political parties work and, of course, the very important subject of civic engagement. We want to see more Canadians involved in every aspect of civic life.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the curtain has been drawn on our artists and creators. There is nothing in this budget that provides stable and predictable funding for artists. The Canada Council plays a major role in the cultural sector. It should not have make do with crumbs.

Will the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women commit to giving the Canada Council the necessary funding to help the artists who so desperately need it?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has her facts wrong once again.

In our first budget as Canada's new government, we dedicated $50 million of new money for the Canada Council.

Since then, we have also eliminated the capital gains tax on publicly traded shares and that yielded $20 million worth of donations going to the arts.

In the budget just released this week, the capital gains tax exemption was extended to private foundations. We expect to see more benefit from that to support our arts, which are so important.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is all well and good to say that others will help the Canada Council and our artists. The former Liberal government was committed to doubling the budget of the Canada Council for the Arts in order to help the cultural sector and to stabilize funding. This Conservative budget ignores our museums, our artists, our television industry and our film industry.

How can the minister explain the meagre results for those she says she defends?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, there are results, as I just mentioned: $20 million in new donations to support our arts communities, which is $20 million on top of what we are doing. That is good news.

Here are some other results. Hilary Pearson, President of Philanthropic Foundations Canada said, “Private foundations make unique and invaluable contributions to Canadian society, helping to advance important public priorities”.

This tax change will spur donations and enable private foundations to do even more for Canadian communities. That is getting results. That is getting the job done. We are getting it done.

Northern Strategy
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government built prosperity in the north with a new northern economic development fund. The Liberal government showed the north was special with a new northern strategy. The Liberal government signed new land claims in the north.

The only promise the Prime Minister made for the north was three icebreakers in a northern port and now they have vanished in the budget.

Would the Prime Minister tell us when his old government will finally keep its promises to the north?

Northern Strategy
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, perhaps I could indicate some of the comments coming out of Yukon, specifically from Premier Dennis Fentie, “I will speak specifically for Yukon. This budget gets us back to a principle based fiscal arrangement with the federal government, something for which we have been striving for some time now. That will be beneficial to us now and in the long term. Overall, I am very pleased with the steps that have been taken for us in Yukon”.

Northern Strategy
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, he did not address the broken promise at all. It was not even in his department.

On two days notice to the military, the Prime Minister and the Defence Minister made an emergency visit to the Arctic to avoid a major world aids conference.

Now the military reports that they disrupted a northern sovereignty exercise. The Prime Minister and the Minister of Defence should know when a northern sovereignty exercise is going on in the north.

The government caused more disruption by raising the hopes of people in small Arctic villages that they would have a great economic boost of an Arctic port.

Now that the government has broken that promise, what will it do for the economic development of these small northern communities?

Northern Strategy
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I am proud of the Prime Minister's commitment to the north, as is my commitment to the north.

I can assure the member and all members of the House that we will meet all our commitments to the north.

Exporail Railway Museum
Oral Questions

March 23rd, 2007 / 11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Carole Freeman Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, on February 27, the House concurred in by a majority vote the 13th report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, calling for national museum status for the Exporail railway museum. This would ensure recurrent funding for the museum which, incidentally, is a major renowned institution in my riding.

Could the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women tell us what steps her government will be taking to implement the recommendations contained in this report?

Exporail Railway Museum
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to museums. When we took over from the Liberals, we had museums with leaky roofs, crumbling infrastructure and, according to the Auditor General, we are actually losing archival material faster than we were collecting it.

Our first priority are the national museums and we have delivered $100 million to our national cultural museums.

Exporail Railway Museum
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Carole Freeman Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, by trying to dismiss the findings of the report with well-worn excuses, the government is showing once again, after the museums assistance program, how little it cares about museum institutions.

Could the minister just tell us if her government is going to move forward on the report, instead of feeding us their usual excuses?

Exporail Railway Museum
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the member should read the budget that was introduced this week because we will be committing $5 million annually to help small and medium sized museums to hire students and youth to work in those communities. We will be engaging those people to get them involved in preserving our culture in the future.

We also have $30 million set aside to help Canadians in their communities for the expression and celebration of their local culture.