House of Commons Hansard #137 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was senate.

Topics

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government betrayed the Atlantic accord. A billion dollars may not be much to a Prime Minister who can afford a palm-reading nose-puffer, but it is a lot to the people of Nova Scotia.

The previous Liberal government signed the Atlantic accord deals in 2005 and lived up to its word. The Conservative government has done the opposite. It broke its promise to Atlantic Canadians and the consequences are severe. Already, potential Conservative candidates in Atlantic Canada are fleeing for cover and abandoning their non-progressive Conservative government.

When will this betrayal end for the people of Atlantic Canada?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I guess the betrayal of the truth is all that the Liberals can come up with, because in fact the member knows very well that every single promise to Nova Scotia was kept and that the Atlantic accord has been fully honoured and will be fully honoured by the government.

He knows that. I just wish he had some respect for the truth when he talks to his constituents.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Liberal Senator Grant Mitchell tabled a bill that proposes removing the Canadian Wheat Board from access to information coverage, ending the transparency and accountability that the Federal Accountability Act finally put into place.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board confirm the government's commitment to accountability and respond to this Liberal Senate bill?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

I certainly can, Mr. Speaker.

I too was shocked to hear that the Liberals were trying to rob farmers of their right to know how their money is being spent by the Wheat Board monopoly. What do the Liberals have to hide? What do they have against farmers? Why are they trying to turn the Canadian Wheat Board into a secret society for their friends?

We will continue to defend farmers. We will continue to advance accountability. We will continue to get the job done.

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, in my riding of Hamilton Mountain, hard-working families are finding it harder and harder to make ends meet. While the rich are getting richer, ordinary Canadians are seeing everything go up except their incomes. Nothing illustrates this more than the absurd situation where banks are posting profits of $19 billion but are still charging students, seniors and hard-working Canadians to access their own money at ATMs.

Will the Minister of Finance put people before profit and pass the NDP's legislation to put an end to ATM fees?

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the member knows that constructive dialogue with the banks has made real progress. The Bank of Montreal is extending a fee waiver on plans for seniors and students. The TD Bank will guarantee ATMs for all students. New account fees have been unveiled by the Royal Bank of Canada and the HSBC. The CIBC has also pledged to have better access for the disabled.

Progress is being made on this because of constructive dialogue, not the kinds of accusations that the NDP keeps throwing around.

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question was not about access to ATMs. It was about the cost of that access.

Our bill, Bill C-429, demonstrates that the government does have the power to act to end ATM fees but that the minister is abdicating his responsibility to protect ordinary Canadians.

As former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney once said to John Turner, “You, sir, had a choice”. The minister is choosing not to help hard-working Canadians. He can but he will not.

Will the government do the right thing today and act on the power invested in its office?

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, the banks have been very responsive in meeting the concerns of people who have a problem with accessing the ATMS and perhaps do not have the financial resources, such as seniors and students.

We believe that it is not up to government to tell the banks what they should charge for a particular service to Canadians. We believe it is up to the consumer to choose. Consumers have choice and that is what we have ensured. I know the NDP does not really like choice, but that is what--

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Labrador.

The Prime Minister
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canadians speculated for months whether the PM was sporting enough eyeliner to make an eighties rock band proud.

Today we learned that he has been consulting the stars and looking into a crystal ball, all with help from his personal clairvoyant, his psychic makeup artist, our own northern Zsa Zsa Gabor. It is enough to make one blush.

The Prime Minister of Canada goes from the Canadian Alliance to the psychic alliance.

Why are the Conservatives not telling taxpayers that their T4s go a long way for the Prime Minister's powder, mascara and daily palm readings?

The Prime Minister
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I knew he was going to ask that question.

Nobody in this government is consulting JoJo but I have had suggestions that perhaps I should consult Cojo.

The Prime Minister
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, we now know the Prime Minister's personal stylist and spiritualist is on the public payroll. He thought this blemish would stay concealed. One would think the Prime Minister would blush with embarrassment at being caught out on such inconsistency. It strikes at the foundation of everything he supposedly ever stood for. It contradicts the makeup of his supposed fiscal responsibility. It just does not gel with the Canadian public.

How can the Prime Minister justify stiffing the Canadian taxpayer for his vanity?

The Prime Minister
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the fact that I am answering this question tells you what a great country this is.

I know my mother would never have dreamed, and certainly very few people would have ever believed that a person like myself could rise to the vaulted position of minister of fashion and style for Canada.

Sports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, Hockey Canada's credo speaks of sportsmanship, and the development of respect for all people by all participants. It also speaks of hockey opportunities for all people regardless of age, gender, race, ethnic origin, religion, or sexual orientation, and in both official languages.

Since there is now evidence that hockey player Shane Doan uttered racist insults during a match against the Montreal Canadiens on December 13, 2005, can the Secretary of State (Sport) confirm that she demanded justification from Hockey Canada for its decision to include this individual on Team Canada's roster for the Men's World Ice Hockey Championships in Russia next week?

Sports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I am not aware of any of those comments but I am sure we would be happy to look into them and get back to him.