House of Commons Hansard #137 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was communities.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the Kyoto protocol, Quebec is asking that its efforts since 1990 be taken into account. By all indications, the federal government is not going to use 1990 as a reference year, but is going to use 2006 instead, which will totally ignore the environmental efforts made by industry in Quebec.

Does the minister realize that he is penalizing Quebec twice because not only does his inaction harm Quebec companies, but his plan also ignores the efforts they have already made?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, for 16 long years, since the early days of the Bloc Québécois, not enough work has been done on this matter. It is our government that is preparing to regulate industry and it is our government that has made a real effort to work with Quebec and the other provinces. It is our government that said that the money requested by the Bloc Québécois was not enough for Quebec. It is our government that is taking action to help all the provinces reduce greenhouse gases.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister has a rather bizarre approach. It is bizarre and unfair.

Does the minister realize that by moving the reference year to 2006, he is in fact compensating the polluters, such as the major oil companies, and punishing those who have made an effort in the past?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, my colleague from Montreal still has not seen our plan for regulating industry. When he sees the plan, he will realize that it is one of the best efforts in the world.

Our government is taking action. We have already made some good announcements in terms of programs, initiatives and the money that will help people reduce greenhouse gases. We will continue to work with Quebec and we will continue to work with all the other provinces.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

April 20th, 2007 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week the NDP asked the government about negotiations with the United Arab Emirates to send some of their soldiers to Kandahar and including Leclerc main battle tanks and two platoons of armoured reconnaissance vehicles and self-propelled guns.

Why has the government gone outside of NATO? Is this an attempt to create a Bush-style troop surge for this spring? We need a clear answer from the government.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the member that there are 11 countries beyond NATO in Afghanistan, all contributing to the security and a better life for Afghan people. We would encourage other countries to join the UN NATO-led effort to make the lives of Afghan people better in the future.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals began this mission and both the Conservatives and the Liberals have kept us there.

If over 500 Canadian reservists are headed to Kandahar next February, is this not an escalation? If it is not an escalation, then what is? The government's direction in Afghanistan seems clear. It wants to have a surge in forces, increasing combat and more firepower.

The question is, why is Canada going so far beyond what other NATO forces consider to be acceptable, despite what the minister said today?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the problem in Afghanistan is the Taliban. The hon. member's party is for withdrawing completely from Afghanistan now. If we did that, the Taliban would take over completely and they would enforce their murderous regime again, where women would have no rights, children would not go to school, cultural institutions would be destroyed, and in the soccer stadiums every week we would have public executions.

That party, the NDP, claims to be for human rights, and it is working in exactly the opposite way.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, news reports are suggesting that Canada is now calling up 500 reservists for combat duty in Afghanistan. Canadians are trying to understand what is happening with this mission.

Yesterday the Prime Minister had an opportunity to provide clarity to our troops, to Canadians and to our NATO allies. Instead, the Prime Minister chose to throw around insults rather than simply say that our troops will end their combat role in southern Afghanistan in February 2009.

Why will the government not tell us its real plan?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our real plan is to make the lives of Afghan people better. It is to bring security and to improve development and governance. In all of those three areas there is steady progress. That is our real secret plan.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, our troops have served honourably in Afghanistan for seven years and have carried out major combat operations over the past three years. We are committed to doing so until February 2009. Today, we have to give NATO a clear response concerning our future involvement so that an effective changing of the guard can take place.

The government must inform our allies immediately that we will cease combat operations in February 2009. What is it waiting for?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would like to offer clarity to the Afghan people. We are there beside them. We are helping them. We will try to make their lives better and offer security, more development and better governance.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, effective diplomacy, defence and development are essential to win the hearts and minds of the Afghan people to achieve success in this mission.

The Conservative government is spending on development only one-tenth of the money it spends on defence. Why has the government failed our troops and the Afghan people so miserably by not providing the effective aid our troops need to achieve success in the south?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade and Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's question is very misplaced. In fact, the Minister of International Cooperation and I were in Afghanistan last week and we saw for ourselves. We met with the people we have helped.

The claim by the hon. member is not very factual and is very misleading. The people of Afghanistan are very happy and thankful for all of the work that Canada and the NATO countries are doing to help them.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, our troops are doing an outstanding job in southern Afghanistan, but the government is not supporting them with enough effective reconstruction aid on the ground in the areas of operation. We know this mission will not be successful unless there is enough aid deployed on the ground where the troops are.

Let us be more specific. How much aid has the government budgeted from now until 2009 in Kandahar?