House of Commons Hansard #154 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was investment.

Topics

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, this government does support the cultural and artistic activities in the local community. We also want to ensure that public money is going to meet the real needs of those communities. Therefore, we will take due process and include all the consultation that is necessary to make it a really effective program for the communities.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Blair Wilson West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, while British Columbians are working hard to build ties with our Pacific Rim partners and become a world-class hub of trade, the Conservative member for Delta—Richmond East is busy trying to tear down what British Columbians have built and the plans they have made.

Yesterday the member said that it makes no sense to push ahead with the Pacific gateway strategy. Why has the Minister of International Trade not condemned these irresponsible remarks and when will he defend the Pacific gateway strategy from attacks from his very own caucus?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question from my colleague because it allows me an opportunity to remind this House the great news that this government announced last week.

We announced that we are delivering $1 billion to the Asia-Pacific gateway. From the Hudson Bay Company, through the FTA, through NAFTA and now the Asia-Pacific gateway, Canada always has been and always will be a trading nation. This government is doing everything it can to ensure that it will continue to grow in the international sphere.

Premier Gordon Campbell said it best. He said, “The B.C. caucus of the federal government, the Conservative caucus, has done a great job of grabbing this initiative” and making it a success for British Columbia.

We are getting the job done.

Canada-U.S. Border
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Dean Allison Niagara West—Glanbrook, ON

Mr. Speaker, in December 2004 Canada and the United States announced their intention to establish a pre-clearance pilot project at the Peace Bridge at the Ontario-New York border. This would involve relocating American border operations onto Canadian soil. Recently, negotiations on the pilot project have broken down.

Can the Minister of Public Safety comment on why the government is no longer in talks with the United States on this issue?

Canada-U.S. Border
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the issue of land pre-clearance offered great potential for easy movement back and forth across the border. It involves officers working on the other person's soil. We had an agreement with the Americans that any agreement had to respect our various laws.

The Americans on their side of the issue are requiring that fingerprints of Canadians be mandatory in certain situations. That goes against our own individual rights.

We want security at the border. We want good movement across the border, but we cannot compromise on our own charter rights. I had to inform the Americans of that. I hope we can find other ways to keep things moving, but we cannot compromise on that.

Official Languages
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, although it says otherwise, the government does not support Canada's language minorities.

Earlier today, the incompetent chair of the Standing Committee on Official Languages was relieved of his duties. The committee cannot get back to work until the government appoints a new chair.

The government whip said that he did not think there would be outrage among Canadians if the committee was not sitting.

Does the Prime Minister agree with the comments of his whip, or will he appoint a new chair?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, the opposition is using this committee to play political games, and it is preventing the members from continuing their fine work. This has nothing to do with the government's commitment to linguistic duality and bilingualism.

In fact, the actions of the opposition in committee in no way contribute to the development of official language minority communities or linguistic duality.

The member's motion serves only his own interests.

Official Languages
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Commissioner of Official Languages has said today that the government is failing its obligations in promoting linguistic duality and developing minority language communities, from anglophones in Quebec and francophones in the rest of Canada.

When will the Prime Minister stand up for these communities, apologize for the comments of the government whip and appoint a new chair to the official languages committee?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Louis-Saint-Laurent
Québec

Conservative

Josée Verner Minister of International Cooperation and Minister for la Francophonie and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, it is clear in this House that the New Democrats and the Liberals are the ones who were against an additional $30 million for the promotion of linguistic duality rights in this country.

It is up to the member to explain why he refused to let Canadian youth benefit from these additional investments.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, the genocide convention and the ICC treaty prohibit incitement to genocide. The Conservative government has publicly condemned President Ahmadinejad's incitement to genocide.

Yet Conservative MPs voted against this motion, while the Minister of Foreign Affairs yesterday said that he did not want to give Ahmadinejad a forum. Mr. Ahmadinejad already has a forum and he is using it precisely to incite genocide.

Will the government implement our international obligations, or will it continue to indulge this culture of impunity? Will its actions match its words?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, as I said the other day in the House, certainly members here support the sentiments behind this motion. The reality is this government has taken action. We moved a resolution at the United Nations General Assembly calling for Iran to improve its human rights practices.

When the deputy leader of the Liberal Party was accusing the Israelis of war crimes, when the member for Etobicoke Centre was accusing Israel of state terrorism, when the member for Bourassa was marching in parades under the Hezbollah flag and when the wife of the member opposite was quitting the Liberal Party, this government was standing up for Israel and condemning Iran for its financial support of terrorism.

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, a Winnipeg mother of three was killed this weekend by an impaired driver. This accident could have been prevented had the driver chosen not to drive while impaired. With a long weekend coming up, I fear that the death toll from impaired driving related accidents will increase yet again.

Could the Minister of Justice please tell the House what action the government is taking to crack down on those who put lives at risk by selfishly choosing to drive while impaired?

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I share the hon. member's concerns. As part of this government's crime fighting agenda, we have introduced Bill C-32 to better crack down on impaired driving in our country. We are giving police the tools they need to better detect drug impaired drivers. We are increasing the penalties for drug impairment.

This is one part of the government's crime fighting initiative, but I want to assure Canadians we are just getting started.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

May 15th, 2007 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Industry a moment ago, in answer to my question, suggested there was reference to a task force in the budget that would be looking into foreign takeovers. That turns out to be incorrect information. The budget simply said that the Minister of Finance would set up an advisory panel to examine the system. He was referring to Canada's international tax system. It did not mention anything at all about foreign takeovers.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I am not sure that the hon. member has raised a point of order. It sounded like a matter of debate to me.