House of Commons Hansard #172 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Atlantic Accord
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Welland, ON

Mr. Speaker, what is unique about the so-called typo in a letter the minister sent to Newfoundland and Labrador is that he is actually admitting a mistake. That could be a first in this entire government.

He refused even to apologize to the millions of investors from whom he swiped billions in hard-earned savings. He backtracked on deductibility but way too late.

Why is it the only time the government wants to correct a mistake is when the so-called mistake actually benefits people?

Atlantic Accord
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Newfoundland & Labrador

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I would just say to the hon. member that for his weekend reading he should go through the budget and list the things in the budget that benefit him and his people. He should look at the benefits to the people of Canada.

The crowd opposite are almost as bad as the premier at home. They overlook all the positive things that are done and they will take one little issue and start nitpicking. They lost their credibility a long time ago.

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, Liberal senators continue to plot and plan political games to delay and obstruct the federal budget, despite it being passed by the democratically elected House of Commons.

Dalton McGuinty, the Liberal Premier of Ontario, is calling on his federal colleagues to pass the budget.

While we know Liberal senators do not listen to their ineffective leader, will they at least listen to Premier McGuinty and expeditiously pass a great budget for all Canadians?

Would the government House leader please indicate how much will be lost for Ontario if the Liberal senators have their way?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I have sat here day after day while a few members opposite have said that we should listen to their premier.

I want to implore the Liberal caucus to listen to my premier. Here is what my premier had to say, “I hope the people in the Senate, the Liberals, are going to pass the budget because the people of Ontario are counting on that”.

I beg and implore the Liberals opposite to adopt a senator, to go down the hall and lobby them on behalf of my premier, Dalton McGuinty.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, last night this House unanimously agreed to condemn the United States and North Dakota governments for breach of an international agreement regarding Devils Lake. The entire Red River system is at stake.

I ask the Minister of the Environment today if his government has launched an official complaint at the highest levels of the United States administration regarding Devils Lake and the diversion of water into the Red River system.

What will the minister and the government do over the next 48 hours to turn off the Devils Lake tap?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for having asked for an emergency debate yesterday evening and her contribution to this important issue.

As she has rightly pointed out, a unanimous motion was passed by the House and we have passed that information on to the U.S. authorities. We are working with the U.S. authorities to address the important issue that was discussed last night.

Health Canada
Oral Questions

June 15th, 2007 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, there are 90,000 toxic toys with high levels of lead in them and the impact on children includes vomiting, diarrhea, coma, or even death. One would think that the government would yank these toys off the shelves but it has not. It is up to private companies to decide whether these toys are toxic. It is up to private companies to yank them off the shelves if they want to.

Why is the minister allowing our children to be poisoned? What is he going to do about it?

Health Canada
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the health and safety of Canadians, especially the safety of Canadian children, is a great concern for this government.

The manufacturer in question issued a recall yesterday of a series of products suspected of containing higher levels of what is considered safe in regard to lead content.

At this time, Health Canada is not aware of any incidents or accidents associated with these toys that are now being recalled.

This government takes the health of children very seriously and will do whatever is necessary to ensure the safety of Canadians.

Forest Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, the Conservative government is once again standing back while a Quebec company makes massive layoffs.

Commonwealth Plywood is closing 18 plants in Quebec and laying off 2,400 workers. The message from the company management was very clear: several of these plants will never reopen and never call their employees back to work.

What is the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec waiting for to develop a plan to help single-industry regional communities?

Forest Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we want a strong, competitive, vital forest industry. We have announced an investment of $127.5 million so that the people who depend on the forest industry can look to the future with confidence.

This initiative will help promote innovation, expand markets and combat pests, and will help address skills and adjustment issues, which are of concern to the industry.

Forest Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, since the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec obtained his portfolio, he has come up with no new money, no strategy and no vision for the regions of Quebec. In addition, in his last two budgets, the Minister of Finance has completely ignored regional economic development. We have lost count of all the blows small communities in Quebec have suffered.

Can he name a single tangible measure he plans to take?

Forest Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, the forest and softwood lumber industry is restructuring. Quebec is in the midst of a serious crisis. As the government, we took real action by settling the softwood lumber dispute, which allowed companies in Quebec to receive $1 billion. That said, stakeholders are discussing stumpage fees and royalties with the Government of Quebec.

We are continuing to support secondary and tertiary processing in this sector. We have introduced six new tools to help the different regions of Quebec.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Blair Wilson West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Delta—Richmond East has once again come out against treaty rights for aboriginal peoples. The member has spoken out against a potential deal between the B.C. government and a B.C. band, even though the federal government has nothing to do with this proposal.

Why has the Prime Minister stood by in silence while the member for Delta—Richmond East campaigns aggressively against virtually all treaties that have been struck with B.C. first nations?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, this government has moved forward on land claims throughout Canada. Treaties have been signed in B.C., which is historic. We look back to a process that was initiated early in the nineties, of course suspicious timing relative to the previous government, $1 billion spent and nothing accomplished.

Thankfully, our government has moved forward with the signing of treaties and is looking forward to continuing to do that.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Blair Wilson West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Delta—Richmond East is not just opposed to land claims. He is also opposed to aboriginal fisheries. The sad fact is that the Prime Minister has not condemned the member because, shamefully, he agrees with it himself.

After more than a year of cutbacks and broken promises from the government, aboriginal people expect more than empty promises on specific claims.

Will the Prime Minister show Canadians that he takes treaty and aboriginal rights seriously and condemn the member for Delta—Richmond East today?