House of Commons Hansard #167 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Whistleblower Protection
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, that might be good enough for this government. It is not good enough for Husein Jeewanjee, Shiv Chopra, Allan Cutler and many others. These innocent public servants did the right thing in the name of better government. They deserve better treatment than broken promises from an increasingly arrogant government.

Has the government not broken enough promises for one week? How many more years for this minister's so-called “speedy” resolution? When will it happen? When will he right this wrong? When will the government deal with these cases as it said it would? That was 13 months ago.

Whistleblower Protection
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Once again, Mr. Speaker, one of the great challenges that the government faced was cleaning up all the corruption that was left behind by the previous Liberal government.

We are investigating corruption at the RCMP that occurred under the previous Liberal government. We are now investigating corruption involving polling from the previous Liberal government. Now the NDP is asking us to clean up corruption and intimidation against whistleblowers who spoke out against the previous Liberal government.

The point I am making to the member is that he needs to be patient because we can clean up Liberal corruption only so quickly.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, the former Liberal government had a proud record of developing strong relationships with our cities and communities. Desperately needed financial support was flowing to cities like Toronto to fix crumbling infrastructure and to assist them in providing services that Canadians need and deserve.

The current government has abandoned our cities and communities.

My question for the Minister of Finance is simply this. When will the government and the minister show some respect and give some help to the communities across the country?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

The truth, Mr. Speaker, is that not only has the government committed to communities and cities in the last budget, budget 2007, we extended the gas tax to its maximum amount, which is going to see us flow over $8.2 billion to our cities and communities.

Last week I was in Calgary at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities meeting, where I had the opportunity of announcing the government's commitment to an urban transit strategy for Canada in the coming years.

On the contrary, we are getting the job done where they did not.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

June 8th, 2007 / noon

Conservative

Brian Storseth Westlock—St. Paul, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in the aboriginal affairs committee the opposition parties continued to block Bill C-44, further preventing Canada's aboriginal people from enjoying the same human rights protections as the rest of Canadians. Even though they have run out witnesses to hear, they are trying to continue the delay by calling the same witnesses back again.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs please tell the House why after 30 years it is time to take action on delivering human rights to aboriginal Canadians?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the opposition parties have shown no class and no ability to move forward on human rights for first nations people. They continue to dither and delay, much like the previous government did on so many fronts.

Thankfully, this government, with the Minister of Indian Affairs, is moving forward and extending human rights to first nations people. I am very proud to be part of that process.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, my riding covers over 8,000 square kilometres. Thirty-eight of the 41 municipalities in my riding are rural and located far from the main urban centre. Gasoline prices have an impact on my constituents' everyday lives and the economic vitality of the key sectors that affect them. Constant price hikes are putting rural communities at a real disadvantage. Once again this summer, it is likely that the rising price of gas will cost us dearly.

Given that in rural regions, nearly all travel is by road, and given that the price of gas affects agriculture, tourism and forestry, when will the Conservative government take action to address this problem that is hitting us especially hard?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

Noon

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, gasoline prices depend on factors including world market trends, the price of crude, and local variables, such as competition and transportation costs. In Canada, only provinces and territories have the power to regulate gasoline prices. If it were up to the opposition parties, they would let the price of gas rise by 60% under Bill C-288. The opposition parties want Canadians to pay between $1.60 and $2.00 per litre.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to seven petitions.

Geneva Conventions Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-61, An Act to amend the Geneva Conventions Act, An Act to incorporate the Canadian Red Cross Society and the Trade-marks Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, there have been consultations and I believe that if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent of the House for the adoption of the following motion:

That, in support of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1757, this House send a message to the Parliament of Lebanon to urge it to reconvene in order to establish the Special Tribunal to try those accused of the assassination of Rafiq Hariri.

Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

Does the hon. minister have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.