House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was ontario.

Topics

Canadian Pacific Rail Yard
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have yet another petition calling on Parliament to pay attention to Canadian Pacific Railway's intent to put in a bargain basement rail yard.

The petitioners are concerned about protecting the Nith River from spills and leaks and other contaminants known to be related to the railroad industry. As well, they are concerned about the lengthy idling of engines that pollute our atmosphere.

There now amounts to about 3,000 petitioner signatures asking that the government pay attention to this despicable situation.

Canadian Health Network
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Robert Thibault West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present to the House a certified petition from concerned citizens across Canada regarding the government's senseless funding cuts to the Canadian health network.

Canada's leading bilingual, non-commercial web based source for health information is slated to close today as part of the Public Health Agency of Canada's mandate to cut $17 million in grants and contributions, despite the $14 billion surplus.

The petitioners call upon the government to reinstate funding to the Canadian health network. I am pleased to add my name to this petition.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

March 31st, 2008 / 3:15 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 87, 188, 191, 194, 197 and 200.

Question No. 87
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Don Bell North Vancouver, BC

With respect to the Summer Career Placement Program for 2005 and 2006 and to Canada Summer Jobs for 2007, in the riding of North Vancouver, what was the total: (a) number of applicants; (b) number of successful applicants; (c) dollar amount of grants awarded to successful applicants; and (d) number of student jobs created?

Question No. 87
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, Human Resources and Social Development Canada does not generally compile or analyze expenditure information by electoral district.

That being said, the summer career placement program was a program which had funding allocated on a riding basis. Therefore, with respect to the riding of North Vancouver, in 2005-06, the number of summer career placement applicants was 36, of which 34 were successful. The total dollar amount awarded to the successful applicants was $275,108 and 85 positions were supported through the program. In 2006-07, the number of applicants was 49, of which all 49 were accepted. The total dollar amount awarded to successful applicants was $369,541, and 117 positions were supported through the program.

The Canada summer jobs 2007 initiative was launched by the government on March 1, 2007, to replace the summer career placement program. This initiative, however, did not allocate funding on a riding basis.

This being said, we can estimate the funding this riding received by using a Statistics Canada tool that attempts to match postal codes with electoral districts. This methodology has potential for error, as postal codes can straddle two or more electoral districts.

Given the caveats outlined above, in 2007-08, for the riding of North Vancouver, the number of Canada summer jobs applications received was 49, of which 29 were successful. The total dollar amount awarded to successful applicants was $232,665 and 69 positions were supported through the program.

Question No. 188
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

With respect to Canada's sixth and seventh reports on the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women: (a) what measures is the government taking past March 31, 2007 to fully implement (i) article 2, (ii) article 3, (iii) article 4, (iv) article 5, (v) article 6, (vi) article 7, (vii) article 8, (viii) article 9, (ix) article 10, (x) article 11, (xi) article 12, (xii) article 13, (xiii) article 14, (xiv) article 15, (xv) article 16, (xvi) article 17 of the Convention; and (b) what measures are being taken past March 31, 2007 to report for the period April 2006 to March 2010?

Question No. 188
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Louis-Saint-Laurent
Québec

Conservative

Josée Verner Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), the Government of Canada cannot yet respond to this question since it is expected to begin collecting information from all federal departments in the summer of 2008 to submit an update on its implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women in the fall of 2008. Updated information on its implementation will be made available at this time.

The Government of Canada announced in budget 2008 that it will develop an action plan to advance the equality of women across Canada through the improvement of their economic and social conditions and their participation in democratic life.

In response to (b), Canada is required to provide a report to the United Nations every four years on measures taken to implement the Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination Against Women. Canada’s last reports, i.e., the sixth and seventh reports, were submitted to the United Nations on May 3, 2007 and covered the period of April 1999 to March 2006. Canada will provide an update to the reports at its next appearance before the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, which is scheduled to take place in October or November 2008.

Canada’s next report to the United Nations will cover the period of April 2006 to March 2010 and will be due in January 2011. The Department of Canadian Heritage will coordinate, on behalf of the federal government, the preparation of the report by federal, provincial and territorial governments.

Question No. 191
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

With regard to the Department of Human Resources and Social Development: (a) what was the funding amount allocated, granted or contributed to the riding of Cape Breton—Canso for the years 2004 to 2007, inclusive, for the purposes of training, retraining or education; (b) within this department, how many federal programs received budget allocation within the riding of Cape Breton—Canso for the years 2004 to 2007, inclusive; and (c) how many student jobs were funded through the Canada Summer Jobs program for the years 2004 to 2007, inclusive?

Question No. 191
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, Human Resources and Social Development Canada does not generally compile or analyze expenditure information by electoral district.

Given this caveat, information is available for the youth--summer career placement and the youth--Canada summer jobs.

The summer career placement program was a program which had funding allocated on a riding basis. Therefore, with respect to the riding of Cape Breton--Canso, for the years 2004 to 2006, the total dollar amount awarded to the successful applicants was $1,924,158 and 1,222 positions were supported through the program.

The Canada summer jobs 2007 initiative was launched by the government on March 1, 2007 to replace the summer career placement program. This initiative, however, did not allocate funding on a riding basis.

That being said, we can estimate the funding this riding received by using a Statistics Canada tool that attempts to match postal codes with electoral districts. This methodology has potential for error, as postal codes can straddle two or more electoral districts.

The amount awarded under the Canada summer jobs in 2007 was $675,088 and 256 positions were supported.

Question No. 194
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

With regards to Canadians sentenced to death abroad, does the government have a clemency policy and, if so: (a) when was this new policy adopted; (b) which Ministers, departments, agencies, and officials were responsible for the creation of this policy; (c) what factors are considered in a clemency determination; (d) what specific information is collected by Foreign Affairs and consular officials when evaluating clemency requests; (e) what criteria must one meet to be granted clemency; (f) what process exists for review of clemency determinations by the government; (g) what oversight process exists for clemency determinations by the government; (h) how does a person apply for clemency protection under this process; (i) is there an appeal process for clemency determinations under this policy; and (j) which Minister, Ministry, Department, Agency, or officials will make clemency determinations for the government?

Question No. 194
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), as of October 31, 2007, the Government has clearly stated that it will address requests for clemency on a case by case basis.

In response to (b) and (j), the Minister of Foreign Affairs has the responsibility under the Department of Foreign Affairs Act to conduct all diplomatic and consular relations on behalf of the Government of Canada, which includes any representations to a foreign government requesting clemency.

In response to (c), (d) and (e), relevant factors would include all the details of the individual case and reference to applicable international standards on the death penalty.

In response to (f), (g), (h) and (i), the Government of Canada's position has been very clear with respect to this matter. Canadian citizens detained abroad will continue to receive consular assistance. In cases where Canadians face the death penalty abroad, the Government of Canada will continue to consider whether to seek clemency on a case by case basis.

Question No. 197
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

With regard to federal funding: (a) has any funding been provided towards construction or improvement of (i) the Trans Labrador Highway, (ii) Quebec route 138 east of Sept-Iles, (iii) Quebec route 389, in each of the past three fiscal years and, if so, under which programs or funding envelopes was this funding provided; and (b) what was the cost-sharing formula for any such projects as between the federal and respective provincial governments?

Question No. 197
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, Infrastructure Canada, INFC, did not provide any funding directly toward the construction or improvement of the Trans-Labrador Highway, Québec route 138 east of Sept-Îles or Québec route 389 in the past three fiscal years. However, the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador jointly announced on December 17, 2007 that improvements to the Trans-Labrador Highway and upgrading of the Argentia Access Road will be among the first funding priorities under building Canada.

Question No. 200
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

With regard to Canadian citizen Omar Khadr, detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba: (a) when was the government first made aware of his detention; (b) does the government consider that he was a child soldier at the time of his initial detention; (c) what efforts, if any, have been made to seek his return to Canada; (d) what consular services and government protections have been afforded to him; (e) does the government intend to participate or intervene in any way during his trial; (f) has the government undertaken any effort to extradite him, or have him otherwise returned to Canada; (g) will the government seek clemency if he is sentenced to death; (h) what assurances has the government received that he is being treated humanely; and (i) is the government aware of, or has it investigated, reports of abusive and ill treatment during his detention?

Question No. 200
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), the Government of Canada became aware in August 2002 that Omar Khadr, who had been captured by U.S. forces following a firefight in July 2002, was a person under control, PUC, at Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan and facing serious charges. On October 30, 2002, the government was informed by the United States, U.S., that Omar Khadr had been transferred to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

In response to (b), the Canadian government has consistently acknowledged that Mr. Khadr was a minor at the time of his alleged offences and arrest. Accordingly, Canada has continuously demanded that the U.S. government take this into account in all aspects of his detention, treatment, prosecution, and potential sentencing. Based on a motion brought by Mr. Khadr’s defence team, the military commission judge is currently considering the impact Mr. Khadr’s apparently unlawful recruitment by al-Qaeda should have on the proceedings.

In response to (c), Mr. Khadr’s case is subject to multiple and complex litigation, both in Canada and the U.S. It would not be appropriate to speculate on the potential outcome of cases currently before the courts. As such, discussions about Mr. Khadr’s return to Canada are premature until such time as the legal process, and the appeals process, have been exhausted.

In response to (d), Mr. Khadr’s case has been raised on several occasions at the ministerial level. Canadian officials have conducted seven welfare visits to Mr. Khadr since his arrival at Guantanamo Bay and it is the government’s intention to continue these visits. The goal of these visits has been to assess his condition and provide a measure of support during his ongoing incarceration. Through these visits, officials have sought to have Mr. Khadr’s detention conditions improved and have made requests for medical treatment and educational support. Officials have also facilitated telephone calls with his family in Canada and access by his Canadian defence lawyers, and have requested repeatedly that Mr. Khadr be given an independent medical and psychological assessment.

In response to (e), Canadian officials have been present as observers at all proceedings against Mr. Khadr in Guantanamo Bay, as well as to the hearing at the Court of Military Commission Review in Washington.

In response to (f), there are no charges outstanding against Omar Khadr in Canada that could be a basis for an extradition request.

In response to (g), the government has received unequivocal assurances from U.S. authorities that Mr. Khadr will not be subject to the death penalty. Charges against Mr. Khadr were referred on a non-capital basis.

In response to (h) and (i), the government has sought and received assurances that Mr. Khadr is being treated humanely, and has repeatedly inquired into his well-being when allegations were made of mistreatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Canadian officials have carried out regular welfare visits with Mr. Khadr, resulting in, among other things, a transfer into a minimal security, communal detention facility. Government officials will continue to conduct these visits.