House of Commons Hansard #86 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was product.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the damning report by the forensic auditor in the Kanesatake affair says that not only was there never any valid authorization to finance the botched raid, but the government is still concealing documents.

The RCMP had said no, the SQ had said no. Yet an official in Ottawa decided that James had to remain as chief.

But who at the top gave the green light? What is the Minister of Public Safety waiting for to order a full public inquiry into the scandal of the raid in Kanesatake?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, this happened under the former Liberal government. When I received the news of some very disturbing events, I immediately called for an inquiry. I received the results of the inquiry two days ago, and we are going to look at them. Some of the things that happened were not good, and we want to have a system where we can correct problems such as the ones that occurred under the Liberals.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, to help the minister decide on the advisability of holding a full public inquiry, I would like to draw his attention to section 6.2.2, which clearly indicates that Indian Affairs was aware of the scope of the police operation that was to take place on January 12, 2004, but did not inform the public safety department.

Will we ever know everything that happened? Who pulled the strings at Indian Affairs to keep James in place? What Liberal interests were protected? Only a public inquiry can answer these questions.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we share my colleague's concerns. I agree with him that there were things involved. The Liberals were in control at the time. We want answers to some very disturbing questions, and we want to know whether people exerted political pressure. As I said, this happened under the Liberals, but now it is our responsibility, and we will find the answers.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Foreign Affairs. As he will know, the UN representative for Afghanistan was before the committee today. He will also have seen today's report in the Globe and Mail on alleged discussions between members of the Canadian military and others with respect to the Taliban.

My question is a foreign affairs question. It speaks directly to the political strategy of the government. Would the minister be good enough to tell us what the strategy of the Government of Canada is with respect to discussions of this kind?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our position is very clear and the Canadian public knows it, but I will repeat it for my colleague. It is very simple. With respect to national reconciliation in Afghanistan and what will come after the Taliban, the Afghan government will be in power, as everyone knows.

This is important. President Karzai said that there would be negotiations if people respect the Afghan constitution and renounce violence. That is the position of the Afghan government, and we support that position.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the UN representative also confirmed that there would be elections in Afghanistan in 2009 and 2010. As we know, Elections Canada played an important role in the 2004 Afghan elections.

Could the minister tell me whether Elections Canada still has the confidence of the government and the minister to do the necessary work in Afghanistan?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it is very simple. We are abiding by the resolution adopted in this House to undertake a mission in Afghanistan that respects democracy and the rule of law. We want Afghanistan to have a stable government. We are fighting against corruption in favour of good governance, and if it asks, we will assist the Afghan government during the election process.

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, the foreign affairs minister failed to explain why he will be missing in action next week when the international community meets in Dublin on the banning of cluster bombs.

Why will he give this issue no priority? Is it because he is afraid of offending Washington, which does oppose the ban?

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I answered that question yesterday in the House, but I will answer my colleague again today.

I made it clear that our country signed the Wellington declaration, and I am proud of that. We will work with the international community to implement it. As I said yesterday, senior officials from my department will be attending the conference.

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

May 1st, 2008 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, the minister chose his words very carefully. He said that Canada only wanted to reduce the impact of certain types of cluster bombs. He avoided saying that Canada seeks an international ban on the production and the use of cluster bombs.

Will he now go on the record and say whether his government supports a ban on cluster bombs, yes or no?

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, Canada has never used cluster bombs. We are in the process of destroying any cluster bombs that we might have here in Canada

We are with the international community. In light of the impact of cluster bombs on human beings, it is important to us to reduce the harmful effect of certain types of cluster bombs.

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, the aid announced by the Conservative government is not nearly enough to deal with a food crisis of this magnitude. The truth is that this crisis is affecting the development of entire countries. Canada is currently far from doing its part because it has allocated just 0.28% of its GDP to international aid.

In the coming days, will the government be tabling its plan to meet the UN's objective of 0.7% of GDP allocated to international aid to fight poverty and hunger in the world?

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I want to reiterate, and it has been recognized by the World Food Bank, that Canada, of all the countries in the world, is the second highest donor to the World Food Programme.

I also want to reiterate that, unlike the previous government, when we make commitments we fulfill those commitments.

Our government said that it would double aid to Africa and we will do that. We will also double our international assistance. We will also ensure we fulfill our food aid commitments.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois presented a motion that would force the government to ensure that if Bill C-33 passes, the implementation of the regulations would not increase the proportion of Canada's corn production currently dedicated to ethanol production.

Will the government act responsibly on the issue of the current food crisis and support this motion?