House of Commons Hansard #97 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was rights.

Topics

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as I previously stated, this project was plagued from its very inception, with hundreds of millions of dollars being spent and technological problems.

More important, this will allow AECL to focus on what it does very well, and that is build power reactors. It has built projects around the world, on time and under budget.

I want to reassure the House that the MAPLE project will have no impact at all on the production of isotopes. It has never produced an isotope, ever.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, when I first asked about the conditions of the Canadian citizen, Mr. Abdelrazik, the foreign affairs minister said “we have provided Mr. Abdelrazik with temporary shelter at the embassy in Khartoum”. We have confirmation today that Mr. Abdelrazik is spending his nights sleeping on the floor in the bathroom of the embassy.

Is this the government's version of a shelter, of a safe haven? Does anyone over there believe this is acceptable for any Canadian citizen?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we are aware of this case, but as the matter is currently now before the courts, it would be inappropriate for us to comment right now.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, on another note, when it came to advocacy groups, the government was happy to cut funding for child care groups and women's groups. It was no problem because they were doing advocacy. However, when it comes to selling the war, it lets the taxpayer dollars flow. It turns on the taps.

The government should know that it is not acceptable. We have now learned that we have a contract with the CDA that is pegged to a performance contract. This is the same kind of philosophy the Bush administration had, and it failed miserably.

Will the government stop funding these propaganda machines and stop trying to sell a war—

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. government House leader.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I think I already told the House of the comments of Alain Pellerin, the executive director of the Conference of Defence Associations. He said that his organization received money from national defence for decades and that the media quotas, of which the hon. member expresses concern, were introduced into its contract in 2002 by the Liberal government.

I know there are people in the country, and the NDP are among them, who do not like to see our military front and centre. Most of all, they do not like to see good news stories about the military.

We are very happy to see there are people doing serious work, pointing out the great successes and accomplishments of our armed forced and why we are so proud of them on the world stage.

The Environment
Oral Questions

May 16th, 2008 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government has announced that June 2 is the deadline for bids for oil and gas leases in the Beaufort Sea. It is rushing to sell five leases worth over $2 billion to the highest bidder in key polar bear, beluga and bowhead whale habitat.

DFO has no integrated management plan and, meanwhile, even U.S. Republicans have moved to recognize the scientific evidence, listing the polar bear as an endangered species.

Industry is calling for an environmental impact assessment. The Mackenzie Valley pipeline is not operational.

Whose interests are the government looking after as they rush these leases out the door?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, that is all nonsense. However, let me tell the member one plan we do not have. We do not have a plan to raise the price of gasoline to $2.25 a litre. Under Bill C-288, the Liberal plan would drive the price of gasoline north.

We now have heard from the leader of the Liberal Party who wants to run across the country during the summer and sell his carbon tax plan. This is ill-fated. It is wrong. It is the wrong approach to start introducing these carbon taxes.

That is not something this government will do and that is something of which the member should maybe take note.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, it gets much worse. A recent U.S. mineral management service study says that there is a 40% chance of a massive oil spill from existing exploration activities off the coast of Alaska.

The cleanup technology has not been developed and the oil spill risk is further compounded because of long winters, extreme cold, ice, high wind and low visibility. In fact, BP could not deal with its spill in the U.S. Beaufort in 2000 because its mechanical recovering system was overwhelmed and it collapsed.

Is this just another case of the government putting ideology ahead of environmental conservation?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the member does not understand how the Species at Risk Act works. He needs to go back and read the act.

Independent Canadian scientists were consulted and they made the recommendation. This government has consulted scientists. We have consulted the Inuit first nation.

Why is that member attacking first nations? Why is he attacking Canadian scientists? Shame on him.

Portrait Gallery
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, since the new national portrait gallery is supposed to be a national institution, it only makes sense to build it in the national capital region. However, this government, which has never cared about promoting Canadian heritage, seems to prefer to leave the construction of the museum in the hands of the company that makes the lowest bid.

Why does this government refuse to build the national portrait gallery in the national capital region?

Portrait Gallery
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the government believes very deeply that it is extremely important to be able to promote Canadian culture in all regions of the country.

That is why we invited all cities interested in becoming home to this new initiative to submit proposals. Today is the deadline for doing so. We believe it is important that Canadian heritage be accessible to all Canadians, from coast to coast to coast.

Portrait Gallery
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, all around the world national portrait galleries are displayed in national capitals, but in Canada, our government considers cultural merchandise to be like any other good that is devoid of any national meaning.

Will the government stop neglecting our culture, send a clear message and build a new portrait gallery in the national capital region?

Portrait Gallery
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, my colleague the Minister of Canadian Heritage has received numerous amounts of correspondence supporting our government's position.

Let me quote what Jeff Browaty, a Winnipeg city councillor, said:

Why should Canadian citizens contribute to so many national institutions that many have no access to? I applaud the [Prime Minister's] government for declaring the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg as the first national cultural institution located outside the capital.

He went on to say, “I truly believe it will be a magnet for people around the world to learn about human rights”.

Labour Market Training
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, in budget 2007, the government promised to transfer the $500 million in funds allocated for young people, people with disabilities and older workers. Yet this government is still trying to impose its priorities on Quebec, thereby encroaching on its areas of jurisdiction and showing a lack of respect for the Quebec nation.

Can the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development confirm that he will transfer the funds for labour market training to Quebec, with no strings attached?