House of Commons Hansard #98 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Multiculturalism
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, as I already said, the Bouchard-Taylor commission was set up by the Government of Quebec, not by the Government of Canada. The federal government has not dictated anything to Quebec regarding the right balance between national identity and cultural pluralism.

Services in French
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is another example of the fact that Quebeckers are considered second-class citizens by the federal government. According to La Presse, more than a quarter of the air carriers that operate out of Montreal offer no telephone services in French. These companies are not subject to the Charter of the French Language because they fall under the federal government's jurisdiction.

Will the Prime Minister finally understand that the only way to ensure that French, the language of the Quebec nation, is respected is to make all companies on Quebec territory subject to Bill 101, with no exceptions?

Services in French
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. This government has actually taken the first steps in the world in order to ensure that pilots communicating with ground do speak in either French or English. This government is clear in its promotion and protection of both official languages in this country and we are going to continue to do so.

Services in French
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are not talking about airline pilots; we are talking about services for consumers in Montreal. This shows that the Conservatives do not take such unspeakable situations very seriously. Such situations are an insult to Quebeckers.

Since the Quebec nation has been recognized, it only makes sense that the common language—French—should be respected. Only Bill 101 can make this happen.

Will the Prime Minister finally realize this and accept this principle?

Services in French
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Secretary of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois is once again trying to stir up arguments. I want to make it clear. Our approach here is a multicultural one. Every Quebec citizen can be served in his or her language, and francophones will never be denied service in their language.

What we need to understand is that the Bloc is trying to create problems to hide its own powerlessness. It has been around for 18 years. We recognized the Quebec nation, we practice open federalism, and all Quebeckers benefit from that. Quebec is growing stronger.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister will try to convince Europeans that someone else can do what he should be doing. However, he knows that the most effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is by fixing a price for carbon by establishing a cap and trade system. The big polluters must pay their share, and we must use the revenues to invest in environmental solutions. That is exactly what the Europeans are doing.

When will the government establish a real carbon cap and trade system?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of the Environment has already said, we intend to put into place a system such as the one the NDP leader spoke about.

We are introducing just that and, in fact, we are introducing mandatory caps on carbon emissions for the first time as well as mandatory rules that will ensure that carbon reductions will go down. This will mean that by the year 2020 we will see a 20% reduction, a stark contrast with the failures of previous governments.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is a complete myth what the hon. member has just said. The emissions will not be capped in any significant or real way, and yet we know that cap and trade can work when it is done right.

Twenty-five years ago we had acid rain throughout northeastern North America. The lakes were dying. Sudbury looked like a moonscape. The government brought in cap and trade, forced the polluters to pay. The money went into the solutions.

I just got back from Sudbury this weekend and the city is coming back to life. The lakes are coming back to life. This is a system that we know works.

Why will the government not bring in a real system and do it now?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I know that the leader of the NDP has been travelling a fair bit.

I invite him, on his next trip on the plane, to read the turning the corner plan which lays out in impressive detail the exact approach that this government is using to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We are putting in place mandatory caps on the major, large emitters, not taxes that line the government's pockets, while allowing polluters an unlimited licence to pollute, not that Liberal approach but mandatory rules that they cannot exceed unless they use something like a cap and trade system that will mean real reductions resulting in a 20% reduction by 2020.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Sudbury.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Diane Marleau Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, I thank the NDP for the accolade. I know Sudbury has turned around and done a great job.

Now we are on to the question. In response to the tsunami that hit south Asia on December 26, 2004, the Liberal government announced matching funds four days later and made them retroactive to December 26.

The government's announcement for matching funds for Burma only covers three weeks of donations, starting on May 15, two weeks after the disaster.

We know the majority of funds are given in the first 72 hours of a disaster. The cyclone hit Burma May 2. Why are the contributions not retroactive to that date?

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, our government has been supporting organizations that have been able to deliver relief directly to victims, and now we are optimistic that the Burmese government will allow open access to all humanitarian workers.

In fact, our government program to match individual contributions of Canadians to organizations working in Burma or China will cover a period of six weeks from the date of the occurrence of the cyclone or the earthquake. This government will continue to do its part and support the generosity of Canadians.

International Aid
Oral Questions

May 26th, 2008 / 2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Diane Marleau Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is the first time we have heard this fact. Could we know when the decision was made to have these contributions be retroactive to the date of the disaster?

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, what is important to Canadians is that the needed help gets to the victims of the cyclone and the earthquake. It is not the amount of money. It is not how it gets there. It is the requirements, the needs, the food, the water, the sanitation, and the medication. It has to get to the victims. This government is making sure it gets to the victims. We are doing that responsibly with respected organizations.