House of Commons Hansard #101 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was police.

Topics

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order. The hon. Minister of Transport.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, while those of us on this side of the House are focused on jobs, are focused on the economy, are focused on the plight of the unemployed and on what we can do to make this country a brighter and better place, we have crossed political lines.

Look what the Liberal deputy premier of Ontario said:

I think overall when we see how all the infrastructure dollars that are stimulus related have been allocated, I am pretty confident that there is going to be a very, very equitable regional distribution.

I agree with Mr. Smitherman.

The bottom line is that the member does not like us working with the Province of Ontario. If he cannot get along with Dalton McGuinty, then thank goodness there are those of us on this side of the House who--

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Saint-Jean.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

October 27th, 2009 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, Richard Colvin, who informed the government of possible cases of torture in Afghanistan, was told by the Conservative government that his lawyer's fees would not be covered even though he had obtained preliminary approval.

The only explanation for the government's reversal is that it does not want the truth to come out about the Afghan prisoners who were tortured in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, in reply to the direct question of whether or not the fees of Mr. Colvin's lawyer will be paid, the answer is yes. There are procedures to be followed and the government will ensure that his fees are paid under the appropriate circumstances.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is asking to see the notes and the names of the people consulted by the lawyer for the individual in question before making a decision on payment.

Is this not a government attempt to breach client-solicitor privilege? Furthermore, it is engaging in shameless blackmail by threatening Mr. Colvin in this way.

Are the Conservatives not showing, once again, that all their gobbledygook about transparency is sheer hypocrisy?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the gobbledygook champion in this House does not sit on this side but on the other side.

I just said that these bills will be paid. There are procedures to be followed; everyone follows them.

I hope that the member will acknowledge the importance of following procedures. At that point, we will be in a position to defray the expenses associated with the individual's defence.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, despite his promise in September, the Minister of the Environment has acknowledged that the Conservative government will not table a regulatory framework before the Copenhagen conference on climate change. This is the third postponement in three years.

Does the minister of oil companies realize that Canada, through its lack of leadership, is sabotaging the negotiations leading to a follow-up agreement on the Kyoto protocol?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our plan is clear: we will reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. That is the North American target and we are using a North American approach.

I might add, about the Copenhagen conference, that it is important to have a national approach that can fit into an international agreement. We have to maintain a flexible approach at the negotiating table in order to increase our chances for success.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister has just shown that he is not a minister of the environment; he is a minister of the oil companies. That is the reality.

By refusing to table this regulatory framework and by requiring Canada to have less stringent reduction targets than Europe and Japan, the Conservatives are showing that they do not intend to negotiate in good faith at the Copenhagen conference.

Will the minister admit that Canada has no credibility when it comes to global warming? That is Canada's international reputation.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Bloc members are going to have to decide if they want to continue to support NDP publicity stunts or if they want to be supportive of real environmental policy.

Reductions that have been put forward by the NDP and the Bloc are not achievable in a Canadian context considering our geography, our climate, the nature of our industrial base, and our population and economic growth since 1990.

This government will press forward with a continental approach, a suggested North American cap and trade approach, the clean energy dialogue, tailpipe emissions standards, aviation marine standards, all the good things that the Bloc should support.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, first the minister ordered 50.4 million doses of adjuvanted vaccine and told the people of Canada that it was safe for everyone. Suddenly, the government put in a special order for non-adjuvanted vaccine for pregnant women. Then it said the order was going to be late. Then it said not to worry, that they could take the first vaccine. Now it has ordered 200,000 more doses of non-adjuvanted vaccine from Australia so pregnant women do not have to wait for the non-adjuvanted. At the same time, the government is saying the adjuvanted vaccine is safe for them. This is dizzying.

What are the pregnant women of Canada supposed to believe?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the Chief Public Health Officer and the medical officers of provinces and territories have all said that both vaccines are safe for pregnant women. We take their advice very seriously and every Canadian who wants a vaccine will receive it.

We are urging Canadians to get the vaccine because this is the best way to protect themselves and their families.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, MPs' offices across the country are inundated with people who do not know what to do. One woman who has previously worked in a--

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

An hon. member

That's not true.