House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was french.

Topics

Justice
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Abitibi—Témiscamingue.

Abitibi—Témiscamingue Emerging Music Festival
Statements By Members

October 28th, 2009 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Monday at the ADISQ Autre Gala, the Abitibi—Témiscamingue Emerging Music Festival won the Félix award for event of the year.

The mission of the festival, which was founded in 2003, is to promote music by emerging artists outside major centres and to showcase highly talented artists, while providing the community with entertainment and culture.

In addition to being a key engine of regional economic growth, the Emerging Music Festival shows that it is possible to produce top-notch, original, cultural activities that are enjoyed by the public in the outlying regions. This type of event owes its success to volunteers, the local business community and the government's financial support.

My colleagues and I wish to congratulate the entire team at the Abitibi—Témiscamingue Emerging Music Festival.

The Economy
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Joe Volpe Eglinton—Lawrence, ON

Mr. Speaker, things have not been this bad in Canada since the last time the Conservatives were in power.

The government's misguided, blundering economic and fiscal policies have taken the country to a point that we now have a $60 billion deficit.

If your wallet seems a little bit lighter, Mr. Speaker, it is because that incompetence represents a $2,000 tax on every man, woman and child in the country. What do we have to show for it?

Let us ask the Minister of National Defence. He convinced the government to give his riding $101 million in infrastructure funds. Every man, woman and child in the constituency of Eglinton—Lawrence was involuntarily taxed $1,000 in order to keep him happy. What makes the Minister of National Defence so special, they ask? Why does the Prime Minister treat Torontonians with such disdain as second class citizens?

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Rodney Weston Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, this fall the Liberal leader has been trying to force an unnecessary and opportunistic election at every turn.

He and his opposition throw mud, make baseless accusations, and present false information in their attempt to force an election, but they are getting nowhere. They even voted against the important recession-fighting measures such as the home renovation tax credit.

Rather than finally accept that Canadians do not want an election, the Liberals continue to flail about, making baseless accusations that are proving to be absolutely false.

Canadians know this government is helping their communities and their families to get through the global economic recession. It is also clear to them that the Liberal Party and its leader have done nothing but launch smears and baseless accusations.

Canadians know that the Liberal leader is not in it for Canadians. He is just in it for himself.

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, people across the country are worried about H1N1.

The government should have given Canadians, well in advance, the information they need to make informed decisions. Instead, the government has spent $60 million to promote itself and a fraction of that to promote public health.

Can the Prime Minister explain to the House why he made those decisions?

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this government has spent over half a billion dollars on the information campaign on influenza AH1N1.

Clearly, it is important that everyone receives this vaccine. That is what the Chief Public Health Officer has stated. The provincial chief public health officers are saying the same thing. We encourage everyone to get this vaccination.

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the question was about public information. Canadian families are worried and uncertain about what information to believe.

The government's public information campaign has been negligent. The government spent more than $60 million on self-promotion, a fraction of that on promotion of public health information and now Canadians do not know what to believe.

Why did the Prime Minister make these choices and how can he justify them to the Canadian public?

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, there is no contradiction in informing the public about the economic action plan and also informing them about H1N1. Information on this has been and continues to be widely available to the public through ourselves, the provinces, the federal and provincial health officers across the country and, of course, local medical officials.

A vaccination campaign is under way and all Canadians are encouraged to take precautions, to take measures of prevention and to take measures of treatment where necessary.

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the member for St. Paul's rose in this House and asked a serious question about H1N1. She was greeted with jeers and catcalls from the other side.

Could the Prime Minister explain how this disgraceful scene occurred, and is he now prepared to apologize?

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I did not see things that way and I was here.

The fact is that yesterday questions were posed about adjuvanted or unadjuvanted vaccine for pregnant women. As the Minister of Health said clearly, both are considered safe by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada.

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, H1N1 is not funny. One can just ask any pregnant woman who is confused and worried about her health and her future child.

In the United States, there have been 700 cases of H1N1 in pregnant women and, of those, 100 pregnant women were admitted to the ICU and 28 died.

Why is the government forcing expectant women to make a choice between the risk of getting H1N1 in these next two weeks or taking a vaccine for which clinical trials are lacking?

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the Chief Public Health Officer and the chief medical officers of this country have stated that both adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccines are safe for pregnant women.

Second, Canada's obstetricians and gynecologists also say that they are safe and available to Canadian pregnant women.

We take the advice very seriously of the Chief Public Health Officer and I think the opposition should as well.

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is about putting patients first, not politics.

Canadians are furious because the current government failed to communicate with them. The long lines at the immunization clinics are there because people have so many questions that they are taking the time of front-line workers. Those are the true heroes of this crisis and those bearing the brunt of the government's abdication of leadership.

We need clarity and unambiguous messages. Why has the government only delivered confusion?

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we have a comprehensive communication strategy and millions of H1N1 posters in public places across the country. We hold dozens of press conferences with the CPHO and myself, including the opposition critics, weekly. Thirteen million households are receiving information on the booklet. As well, on the Internet, on Twitter and on Facebook, there is information about H1N1. Millions of pandemic preparedness guidelines are available across the country, as well as extensive social marketing that has started since the spring, which includes radio ads, newspaper ads and so on. This is the largest vaccination campaign in the history of this country.

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is refusing to say whether he agrees with what his Quebec lieutenant said about the participation of directors of Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated in a partisan activity. These directors, who are government appointees, broke the ethics rules. It is these same directors who awarded a contract to study the condition of the Champlain Bridge to BPR, a firm for which Senator Housakos was working at the time.

Yes or no, does the Prime Minister agree with his political lieutenant, who does not consider it very important that the directors he appointed broke the ethics rules? The question is clear.