House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Sitting Resumed
Business of Supply
Government Orders

5:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The House resumed from October 23 consideration of the motion that Bill C-290, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (tax credit for loss of retirement income), be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Income Tax Act
Private Members' Business

5:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

It being 5:30 p.m., the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-290 under private members' business.

Call in the members.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Vote #119

Income Tax Act
Private Members' Business

5:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

I declare the motion carried. Accordingly, the bill stands referred to the Standing Committee on Finance.

(Bill read the second time and referred to a committee)

The House resumed from October 27 consideration of the motion.

Income Support Program for Older Workers
Private Members' Business

5:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on Motion M-285 under private members' business in the name of the hon. member for Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Vote #120

Income Support Program for Older Workers
Private Members' Business

5:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

I declare the motion carried.

It being 5:55 p.m. the House will now proceed to the consideration of private members' business as listed on today's order paper.

The House resumed from September 28 consideration of the motion that Bill C-391, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act (repeal of long-gun registry), be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Criminal Code
Private Members' Business

5:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Mississauga South has seven minutes left for his remarks.

Criminal Code
Private Members' Business

5:55 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, we are dealing with private member's bill, Bill C-391.

I have always been very supportive of private members' bills. It is an important opportunity for individual members to express their views on issues that are very important to them and I respect them very much. We expect that they should provide clear, concise and correct information that is represented in a manner which is truthful and plain. The integrity of the bill is being scrutinized now, here at second reading, before it has a vote whether or not to go to the committee to have some witnesses.

Bill C-391 says it is an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act regarding the repeal of the long-gun registry. Bill C-391 does not repeal the long gun registry, period. If we turn to the summary of the bill, right in the published material itself, it says:

This enactment amends the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act to repeal the requirement to obtain a registration certificate for firearms that are neither prohibited firearms nor restricted firearms.

It means that the registry will have to continue. It means that there still will be a registry that has prohibited and restricted firearms.

Criminal Code
Private Members' Business

5:55 p.m.

An hon. member

What is the point?

Criminal Code
Private Members' Business

6 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, a member asks what is the point?

I would just say that if members are going to be truthful and plain, they have to be honest with their colleagues in the House and with Canadians that this bill does not abolish the registry. The Minister of Public Safety said in question period, “We want to abolish the firearms registry”. This bill does not do that. Those are the facts. It is not my opinion.

I was here in 1993 when we went through the process of an extensive review, consideration and consultation. It took almost two years by the time things got settled. It cost about $2 billion, ultimately, all in, for this registry to actually get up and be operational.

It was never going to cost that amount. However, about 90% of the registrations that were put in were deliberately put in with errors and omissions, which required extensive human resources. Someone had--

Criminal Code
Private Members' Business

6 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!