House of Commons Hansard #94 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was autism.

Topics

Biotechnology
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, on this issue and on many other issues, it is interesting to hear the Bloc stand up and talk about a variety of things and attack this government.

I want to quote, if I could, France's finance minister, who, in talking about Canada's overall approach during this global economic slowdown, said: I think …we can be inspired by …the Canadian situation. There were some people who said, ‘I want to be Canadian’.

I wish all members in this House felt the same way.

Biotechnology
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, while Quebec strongly supports its biopharmaceutical industry, this Conservative government refuses to act on the issue of innovative pharmaceutical companies' right to appeal. This jeopardizes investments in research and development.

When will Canada create a fair right to appeal in terms of competition?

Biotechnology
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, on research and development, this government has taken steps that no other government in Canadian history has taken. We have invested $5.1 billion in science and technology through Canada's economic action plan.

The result of that, in terms of Canada's competitiveness, is that the World Economic Forum recently announced that Canada would be one of only two industrialized countries that would emerge from this global slowdown in a more competitive position than we went in.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

October 9th, 2009 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, last year's Conservative strategic review caused a loss of $4 million for the Museum of Civilization and the War Museum. This reduction makes it very difficult for management to fulfill its responsibilities and protect the well-being of employees. So much so, that subcontracting is widely used, thus depriving employees of job security.

When will the Conservatives direct the management of the museums to go back to the table to negotiate an end to the strike that damages the reputation of these two national emblems?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, the member should know that national museums are independent from government. However, we do urge the parties involved to keep working toward a resolution.

The member should also know that funding for our national museums has gone up every year since this government took office. It has gone up over levels from when the Liberals were in government. The member should know that because on the last budget I think he actually supported it initially and then voted against it later. However, he did originally think museums deserved more money. We have always felt that way.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is misleading the public again.

The strike by the 420 employees of the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the Canadian War Museum has entered its third week. These employees are simply asking to be paid the same as other Canadian museum employees. The Conservatives' cuts to culture are starving our museums.

When will the minister help these two museums find solutions, so that their employees can have fair working conditions?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, a federal mediator has been working with the parties even before the strike began and continues to work with them to bring about a solution. We are monitoring the situation closely. We are urging the parties to come to an agreement in the interests of all Canadians.

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is the same old story of shady fundraising behaviour.

Michael McSweeney, a registered lobbyist for the Cement Association of Canada, organized a fundraiser for the Natural Resources minister from his corporate office. Robert Poirier organized a fundraiser for the Industry minister and was rewarded with an appointment to the Toronto Port Authority, better known as the Tory pork authority.

Will the ministers actually admit that using private companies, crown corporations and lobbyists to raise money for themselves is unethical and unacceptable?

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for the question but the reality is that I have answered this already in the House. We are the government that brought in a third party and strengthened third party powers to arm's length agencies to be able to deal with these kinds of matters.

As I have said before, the Natural Resources minister has had correspondence from the Ethics Commissioner who has cleared her of all allegations. They are totally unfounded.

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, actually that is not true. This behaviour is not new. We saw it when the Liberals were in power and now we are seeing it with patronage appointments to the immigration board, to our judiciary and to the boards of crown corporations.

Appointments are a reward program for bagmen, campaign managers and failed candidates. The more pork they bring into the Conservatives, the more rewards they will get.

When will the Conservatives stop this abuse and stop this unethical and illegal behaviour?

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, the witch hunt that is being attempted by my hon. colleague and her party, and one over here, is absolutely unfounded. I do not know why she believes that she is more valid to be able to speak to this than the Ethics Commissioner. We strengthened those powers and the member in question has been completely cleared.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is committed to helping those hardest hit by the global recession. This is why we introduced legislation that provided from five to twenty extra weeks of EI for unemployed long-term tenured workers. These Canadians have worked hard, paid premiums for several years and now they need help while they search for new employment.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development tell the House what he is hearing from witnesses who are before the committee that is discussing this right now?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I will share what we are hearing. Yesterday in committee we heard from the Canadian Labour Congress and the United Steelworkers, both which support speedy passage of Bill C-50.

However, the witness that had the greatest impact was Rosalie Washington, who lost her job after 20 years. She literally pleaded with all parties to support the bill. It will provide her with much needed help so she can put food on the table for her three children.

The Liberal leader should stop caring only about himself, start caring about hard-hit Canadians like Rosalie Washington and support our bill.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2007, the House adopted a motion calling on the government to recognize Exporail in Quebec as Canada's national rail museum.

The Canada Science and Technology Museum's board of directors has since approved a plan that would see it become the owner of Exporail's assets, valued at around $100 million, for only $1. However, the government has nixed the deal.

Why can the government not recognize a good deal when it sees one? Is it because it would involve an investment in culture? Is it because it would involve an investment in Quebec? Or does the government have something against celebrating Canada's rail history?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, once again, it is surprising to get these questions from the party that has most recently voted against culture and against initiatives to increase funding to national museums.

Not only is funding at its highest levels under the Prime Minister, but our government has created two new national museums in Winnipeg and Halifax. It has delivered more support for arts and culture than any government in history. It may pain the member opposite to hear that, but the facts speak for themselves.