House of Commons Hansard #15 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was first.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the member was present when the commissioner explained that the policy had changed as a result of the standing committee's recommendations. I do not know what the surprise to him is that he would think that it would only change because he asked the question.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a disconnect between what the commissioner said and what RCMP officers, who actually hold the tasers and make the decision, said.

Further, yesterday in committee the commissioner said that tasers can take lives, that there have been 11 deaths related to tasers in Canada. Later in the day he said not so.

Yesterday the minister and commissioner said there is a new policy that was secretly implemented. Then later the same day the rank and file officers say that no real changes were made. The staggering mismanagement of the government puts civilian and RCMP lives at risk.

When will the government implement the committee's recommendations and get on with the work?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, when the member opposite uses half-truths and tries to indicate that they are the truth, he should really go back and review the evidence that was presented before the committee and what the commissioner had to say. He indicated that the tasers had been used a number of times, there had been deaths, but they have never been attributed to the taser.

Public Opinion Research
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Dave Van Kesteren Chatham-Kent—Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government has always been committed to the responsible use of taxpayers' money while ensuring that we meet the needs of the constituents that we serve.

On Tuesday, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services released an annual report on public opinion research. While the government has a duty to better understand the needs, priorities and expectations of Canadians, there was a clear need to control spending in this area.

Could the parliamentary secretary inform the House on the POR spending?

Public Opinion Research
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

This government made a commitment to spend wisely and according to the priorities of Canadians. This also speaks to our commitment to ensure openness and transparency.

In February 2008, our government announced the implementation of spending controls. I am pleased to inform the House that the value of public opinion research contracts awarded in 2007-08 was $6.6 million lower than the preceding year, a 21% reduction.

Once again, we are keeping our promise to manage public funds responsibly.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week Canadians were surprised to learn that the lawsuit involving serious allegations of bribery offers to the late MP, Chuck Cadman, had been suddenly withdrawn with no answer.

According to an expert hired by the Conservatives, journalist Tom Zytaruk was falsely accused of tampering with the audiotape record of his interview with the Prime Minister. Despite this, the government continues to claim Mr. Zytaruk tampered with the tape.

Would the government today either provide evidence that Mr. Zytaruk doctored the tape or apologize to him immediately?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we need not provide that evidence because it was already provided in court. It was proven that the tape was doctored, but happily the issue has been resolved now. There has been a settlement and we are very pleased with that settlement.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

It is not over for Mr. Zytaruk. The member just maligned him again, Mr. Speaker.

I am going to suggest to the parliamentary secretary that he leave the House after question period and repeat that statement, so Mr. Zytaruk can sue him for maligning his reputation.

Will he do that or not?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I have said before and will say again that the matter is settled.

Air Canada
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the dismantling of ACE Aviation, the parent company of Air Canada and Aveos, does not respect the spirit of the Air Canada Public Participation Act regarding maintaining overhaul centres in Montreal, Winnipeg and Toronto.

What will the government do to ensure that ACE and its corporations comply with this act?

Air Canada
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian aerospace industry is not unlike other industries and will feel the effects of the global economic crisis. In 2007 we announced $900 million for the industry through SADI and $153 million invested to date.

Through the IRB policy and the Canada first procurement strategy, contracts are going to Canadian firms. Today the Prime Minister will be making an announcement in Montreal that I encourage all members to watch.

Air Canada
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, we referred to the Montreal, Winnipeg and Toronto overhaul centres. I see that the parliamentary secretary does not understand.

The 2009 budget implementation act will increase foreign ownership of Air Canada from 25% to 49%. The government's attitude towards Air Canada is becoming clearer by the day.

Does the government deny that it is subjecting the carrier to blind deregulation, with the disastrous effects that this approach had on employment in the United States?

Air Canada
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I would point out that I have already answered the aerospace question, but I will talk a little bit about the budget.

We are coming up on some really important votes to do with the budget, a budget that will help provide support for Canadians who are out of work due to the global economic slowdown. It will help Canadians get re-trained and get back into new jobs, those Canadians who can do so, as soon as possible.

Because of the steps that we have taken, Canada is in a position that is the envy of the rest of the world as we head into this slowdown. I would encourage all members in the House to pass this budget as soon as possible.

Olympic Winter Games
Oral Questions

February 13th, 2009 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the federal government is refusing to disclose how much it will contribute to security for the Olympic Winter Games that open in Vancouver a year from now. The B.C. government is tabling its budget next week, but it cannot tell British Columbians how much it has to pay unless it knows what the federal government is going to pay.

My question is very simple. What is the federal government going to contribute to the games' security and when will it tell British Columbians what it is going to pay?

Olympic Winter Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, both the Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia are continuing to work on the cost sharing agreement. Because negotiations regarding that arrangement are still ongoing, we cannot provide further comment at this time. The Government of Canada is committed to transparency and will disclose the full amount of the security budget once all the agreements have been finalized.