House of Commons Hansard #49 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, this government has acted very quickly with respect to the need to have clean energy in this country. In fact, we have set a very aggressive standard of having 90% non-emitting sources of electricity by 2020 and we are working very hard toward that.

Indeed, we have put a significant amount of money into having clean sources of energy and developing our renewables. That is what action is all about and we continue to do it.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc has released phase II of its assistance plan, which proposes measures to stimulate strategic spending and reduce our dependence on oil. But to reduce that dependence we must also set absolute greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Even the president of TMX Group says that the Montreal Climate Exchange is getting off to a slow start because of federal greenhouse gas policies.

Will the government finally wake up and realize that we must have absolute greenhouse gas emission reduction targets if we do not want to miss the boat on sustainable development?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in the past 10 days, I have met with every environment minister in the G8, and my visits to the United States and Italy were extremely productive. I was able to discuss our plan for Canada with my counterparts. We also discussed our continental and international approach to fighting climate change.

The Bloc should stand up and applaud us because all Quebeckers and all Canadians will benefit.

Health
Oral Questions

April 30th, 2009 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, health officials missed the opportunity to act in Mexico, where there are 2,500 suspected cases of flu. CDC and WHO officials say that the flu may turn out to be more similar in both Mexico and the United States; that is, more mild cases may be uncovered in Mexico and more severe ones found in the U.S.

What is the minister doing to ensure that no opportunity to intervene appropriately is missed here in Canada?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, Canada is well positioned to deal with this issue. We have a national plan for disease outbreaks and we are following it.

All the cases in Canada to date have been mild. We have issued travel health warnings regarding non-essential travel to Mexico. I have spoken with my provincial and territorial counterparts across Canada and have provided them updates. We have engaged Foreign Affairs, Public Safety and Citizenship and Immigration. I am also having regular discussions with our international partners, including the World Health Organization and health officials in the United States and Mexico.

As the hon. member knows, I have been updating my opposition critics and continue to update Canadians regularly.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the swine flu outbreak is very dynamic, fluid, and is rapidly evolving. The increased threat level signifies that we have taken a step closer to a pandemic.

Should a pandemic occur, how will it be decided who has been exposed and requires treatment? How will antivirals be distributed?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government's highest priority is the health and safety of Canadians.

That is why in budget 2006 we invested $1 billion to increase Canada's preparedness to respond to public health threats, including an influenza pandemic.

The Public Health Agency of Canada, working with the provinces and territories, has developed a comprehensive pandemic influenza plan. The plan includes domestic vaccine capacity as well as stockpiling of antivirals.

I can assure all hon. members that we are continuing to review and update this plan in order to protect Canadians.

Transportation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Massimo Pacetti Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Aéroport Montréal Saint-Hubert Longueuil will soon have a new terminal, no thanks to the Conservatives, but rather thanks to private investors. The airport's runway needs to be rebuilt, and the Conservatives are dragging their feet on allocating the funds needed.

When will the Conservatives finally deliver the building Canada funds for the Aéroport Montréal Saint-Hubert Longueuil?

Transportation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is a great thing when the private sector makes investments in Canada.

The Minister of Finance and I were at an airport in Toronto. All $45 million is being paid privately. This is creating a lot of jobs.

Under the building Canada fund and under the airports capital assistance program, we have the opportunity to provide a limited amount of money in support. We would certainly be prepared to give the Saint-Hubert airport due and fair consideration.

Transportation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Massimo Pacetti Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is not good enough. The problem with that answer is that it seems easier to find the money to redo the tarmac at the airport in the revenue minister's riding.

Unlike the revenue minister's pet project, jobs are at stake in Saint-Hubert. Pratt & Whitney conducts its engine testing there.

Meanwhile, in the U.S., Plattsburg airport is getting generous government funding to modernize and is openly courting Pratt & Whitney to move there.

Do the Conservatives want to see well-paid aerospace jobs moving down south?

Transportation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Absolutely not, Mr. Speaker. That is why this government, through the Minister of Industry and many others, is making substantial investments, particularly in Canada's dynamic aeronautics industry. It is an important cornerstone of the Canadian economy. It is very important obviously in the province of Quebec.

I would certainly be pleased to look at any proposal with respect to Saint-Hubert and respond to the member opposite.

Obviously, we want to ensure that infrastructure dollars are spent right across the country so they can create more jobs, more hope and more opportunity.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Devinder Shory Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment has just returned from a series of successful meetings with the G8 in Italy and in Washington for the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate.

Could the minister please explain to the House how this government is succeeding in developing a real climate change plan, unlike the former Liberal government that recklessly signed Kyoto and allowed our emissions to grow by 35%, damaging Canada's reputation as a responsible environmental steward?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in the past 10 days I have met with every environment minister from all of the world's major 17 economies. I have also had the opportunity to meet all of the senior environmental officials in the Obama administration. We are constructively engaged in every forum and in every way.

Then we have the Liberals who support a carbon tax, who support NDP tiddlywinks bills, and now, according to the member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, support pumping raw sewage into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. These are the sum total of the Liberal policies: tiddlywinks, carbon taxes, and incremental--

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Nickel Belt.

AbitibiBowater
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, AbitibiBowater's bankruptcy sent shock waves through northern Ontario towns like Iroquois Falls, putting entire communities on the brink.

However, it now seems as though Abitibi is taking its financial woes out on its former employees. Abitibi started by cutting workers' severance, then it cut early retirement packages and now it is cutting seniors off from their hard-earned pensions. Enough is enough.

When will the government finally stand up for workers and pensioners in Iroquois Falls and across the north?