House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tobacco.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem led by the hon. member for Cape Breton—Canso.

[Members sang the national anthem]

House of Commons Interpretation Services
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bruce Stanton Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, over the more than three years since I was elected as a member of Parliament, I have always been impressed by the courtesy and professionalism displayed by the staff of the House of Commons and the parliamentary precinct as a whole. They deserve the admiration and praise of all hon. members.

However, there is a group of about 40 dedicated staff here on the Hill who, although we listen to regularly each day here in the House and in committee, we seldom get the chance to meet face to face.

Just to qualify to work in this area, they need a Master's degree from the University of Ottawa, followed by at least one year of practical training. The transcription of their work becomes a testament to the presentations and interventions by hon. members and senators each day of each session of each Parliament.

By now I am sure members will know or will have guessed of whom I speak. I welcome all hon. members to join me in expressing our sincere gratitude and appreciate to the people of interpretation services.

Quintessential Vocal Ensemble
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to recognize the success of the Quintessential Vocal Ensemble from Newfoundland and Labrador, who represented Canada and captured three awards this past week at the prestigious Florilège Vocal de Tours international choral competition held in France.

They won awards for the best overall renaissance program and received the prix du ministère de la culture for the best presentation of a French choral work composed after 1830.

The Quintessential Vocal Ensemble is conducted by Susan Quinn. It was formed in 1993 by the alumni of the award-winning Holy Heart of Mary High School Chamber Choir, my alumni, so that their musical experiences might continue. The choir has distinguished itself by winning prizes and awards both nationally and internationally.

The choir continued their successful tour of France this week, giving performances at Vimy Ridge, Beaumont-Hamel, Arras today, and Paris tomorrow.

I am proud to count these individuals among my constituents and friends, and offer my heartfelt congratulations.

Quebec Week of the Disabled
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Ève-Mary Thaï Thi Lac Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is Quebec Week of the Disabled. As members of Parliament, we can contribute to raising public awareness of the variety of situations the disabled experience. We are all aware of the daily struggle the disabled have as they strive to take their place in society and especially to win respect for their rights.

It takes only simple actions to support them in their efforts.

May I take this opportunity to salute the not for profit organizations in my riding, as well as all others that provide invaluable service to all those living with disability. I did volunteer work myself for a number of years and I know just how much needs to be done.

Today is an opportunity for me to invite my colleagues in the House to think about some one thing they can do for this Quebec Week of the Disabled. It is also an opportunity to salute all those people who continue to battle daily for acceptance in society.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, health care is fundamental to us as Canadians.

I am proud to be part of the New Democratic Party, a party that has led and continues to lead the fight on health care in our country. We recognize, however, that there is a lot left to be desired when it comes to Canada's health care first peoples, first nations.

Despite Canada's obligation to first nations in terms of health care, they face one of the lowest standards of living in Canada, challenges that many Canadians cannot imagine.

First nations need more doctors, nurses and health workers to meet the demand, preventing such tragedies as the death of Chace Barkman of Garden Hill who was misdiagnosed.

First nations need preventive supports, as we are now dealing with a possible outbreak of the flu in St. Theresa Point that could potentially be damaging.

First nations need health care infrastructure in their communities that fit their needs, whether it is Cross Lake, Opaskwayak Cree Nation or the Island Lake region that have been demanding health centres for some time.

Finally, first nations deserve access to housing, roads, water and sewer services, education and employment that so many Canadians take for granted.

Skin Cancer
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Dona Cadman Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, last evening I had the pleasure of co-hosting, along with the Canadian Dermatology Association, the third annual Chuck Cadman memorial skin cancer clinic.

I am pleased to announce that last night's event saw its highest turnout of over 150 guests. The doctors performed over 60 full examinations and many partial.

In 2009 it is estimated that more than 75,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer, 5,000 will have melanoma, and 940 will die.

Skin cancers, including melanoma, are highly curable if detected and treated early.

I would like to thank my colleagues from all sides of this House, the Upper Chamber and staff for coming out and partaking in this important event.

This summer I will host a similar event in my riding in which I hope that together with the Canadian Dermatology Association, we can help save lives.

Montreal's Mount Sinai and Jewish General Hospitals
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw attention to the historic anniversaries of two health institutions founded by the Montreal Jewish community and located in my riding.

The first is the centennial anniversary of Mount Sinai Hospital, a state of the art McGill University affiliated teaching hospital specializing in respiratory care, palliative care and long-term care, underpinned by innovative research and exemplary ambulatory services.

The second is the 75th anniversary of the Jewish General Hospital, one of the province's largest and most engaged cutting edge health care institutions, also affiliated with McGill University, that admits more than 23,000 patients a year together with at least 300,000 outpatient visits, 67,000 emergency visits and delivers more than 4,000 births on an annual basis.

I invite my colleagues to join me in paying tribute to these two world class institutions providing comprehensive, accessible, innovative, responsive and patient-oriented health care to all Quebecers and beyond.

Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Evron
Statements By Members

June 3rd, 2009 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, in August 1909 eight women from the Sisters of Charity Notre Dame d'Evron in France arrived in Trochu, Alberta and established a hospital and a school.

One hundred years later we will honour them as they succeeded in bravely facing the many challenges of pioneer life on the prairies.

This August, Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Evron from all over the world including Africa, England, France, Peru and Canada will join us to celebrate in Trochu, Alberta.

The St. Mary's Health Care Centre in Trochu has served generations of families in need of hospital care in my riding.

We will name the new subdivision in Trochu “Evron Place” dedicating it to the memory of the sisters who came here to help build and serve our community.

The Knights of Columbus, the Communities in Bloom, the town council, local businessmen and school children are all pulling together to commemorate the 100th anniversary.

In Trochu we are thankful and truly blessed by the efforts and legacy of these eight sisters and the many who followed them.

Bill C-306
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, on June 1, I spoke to Bill C-306, An Act respecting the use of government contracts to promote economic development at second reading . This bill will make it possible to create hundreds of jobs and, we hope, to attenuate some of the negative effects of the economic crisis we are going through.

What did the Conservative member and Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board have to say? “The year is 2009, not 1929. We live in a time when Canada no longer needs to prop up its industries with protectionist laws.”

As for the Liberals, they said they would not support Bill C-306 because “the bill seems aimed less at being passed than as a medium for certain partisan discussions.” Yes, let us send this bill to committee where it can be discussed. What a lukewarm reaction from the Liberals.

As for the workers of Quebec, they understand that one of the things a bill like C-306 is aimed at is economic recovery.

Clean Air Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Stephen Woodworth Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in celebration of Clean Air Day.

Clean Air Day is an important part of environment week first championed by our great former Conservative Prime Minister, John Diefenbaker.

For too many Canadians air pollution is a significant health concern. That is why our government is continuing the Conservative tradition of cleaning up our air.

Our government is committed to reducing pollution and its negative effects. We are expanding the air quality health index launched in 2007. We are committed to solving the health impacts experienced by Canadians on poor quality air days.

We are also working with the provinces and other stakeholders to put in place regulations to reduce air pollution from industrial activities.

We are holding a formal dialogue with the United States to reinforce our efforts to reduce air pollution.

I challenge all members of the House to champion air quality within their own constituencies.

Clean Air Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is Clean Air Day, a chance to recognize the importance of the quality of air we breathe.

Even in tough economic times, we must make clean air a priority. Doing so is an investment in our future.

A recent poll commissioned by the Canadian Lung Association found that 54% of Canadians believe clean air should be a top priority for both provincial and federal governments.

Only 30% of Canadians said that their governments are doing enough to clean up dirty air. That is a strong message that we need to be doing more to protect the health of Canadians and the environment in which we live.

Air quality affects everyone. Children, seniors, asthmatics and outdoor workers are particularly at risk. Dr. Menn Biagtan of the British Columbia Lung Association has said that the link between air pollution and lung disease is often under appreciated.

I invite the government to use Clean Air Day 2009 as a reminder to take stronger action and ensure Canadians enjoy a cleaner environment, fewer smog days and healthier lungs.

Nunavut Official Languages Act
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Shelly Glover Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to speak to the hypocrisy of the Liberal Party and its empty rhetoric on Canada's north.

On Monday, this House spoke with one voice and endorsed a motion recognizing the Nunavut Official Languages Act. This motion is the result of 10 years of consultations on the best ways to preserve the Inuit language and culture.

The motion also recognizes that the Inuit will proudly control their institutions, speak their language and manage their future. This was a historic occasion.

Unfortunately, on Tuesday, unelected and unaccountable Liberal Senators blocked the passage of this step forward for Nunavut. This is a disgrace and members of the Liberal Party should be ashamed of themselves.

Unlike the Liberals, we take the north seriously. We value its place, culture and creed within Canada. With Conservatives, our northern policy is more than just empty lip service. With Conservatives, it is real action.

1989 Tiananmen Square Protest
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, 20 years ago, Ding Zilin's son went to Tiananmen Square to celebrate free speech, democracy, and to push against corruption. Along with other students, Jiang Jielian died that night on the square.

Since then, China's economic reforms have lifted millions out of poverty. However, a great country must allow for workers' rights and encourage human rights reform.

Let us redouble our efforts here in Canada to build a stronger relationship with China through cultural exchange and trade so there are more opportunities for dialogue on democracy and human rights.

Tiananmen mothers cannot mourn in public, but they can rest assured we will remember them and their children.

Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Daniel Petit Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the opposition leader's fiscal agenda is clear: he wants to raise taxes. He himself has admitted that he will have to raise taxes.

We would like to remind him once again that Canadians do not want tax hikes. It is clear that the Liberal leader is gradually falling into his party's bad habits. It is also clear that people across the country do not want to go backward.

Fortunately, the Leader of the Opposition has an alternate plan. He told us that if he were not elected, he thought he would ask Harvard University to take him back.

He seems to have his heart set on returning to Harvard. He can rest easy: more than ever, our government is committed to fighting these tax hikes and his centralist fervour and giving Harvard University a gift.

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, members will be called on to vote on my bill, which would require federally regulated companies to comply with Bill 101 in Quebec. The Liberals and Conservatives like to brag about recognizing the Quebec nation, but they refuse to give expression to that recognition by honouring that nation's only official language: French.

The leader of the Liberal Party can talk all he wants about being the first federalist in Ottawa to recognize the Quebec nation, but in actual fact he thinks like the Conservatives. He is ducking the issue and will be absent for the vote, and his fellow Liberals will vote against this bill. In 2006, the same Liberal leader said that recognizing Quebec as a nation within Canada did not mean making new concessions.

Quebeckers are not stupid. They know that there is no difference between the Liberals and the Conservatives and that these parties will never take real steps to recognize the Quebec nation.

The Bloc Québécois members, on the other hand, stand up to defend Quebec and the French language.